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  1. Hi, I have been resurrecting my older TI equipment and I am down to one non-QI motherboard left to repair and two QI console power supplies that are not working. I would like to repair them but I haven't found any schematics to make the job easier. I am capable of tracing these out and making a schematic but I'd rather not reinvent the wheel if their is already a schematic floating around. I have found the non-QI power supply schematics in my places. Does anyone know of a schematic for the QI console power supply? BTW: The motherboard that needs repair is from the first TI I bought back early 83(??? hard to remember but the chip date codes match this). My wife-to-be was vacuuming and hit a connecting wire, the video out I believe. The cord was sucked up and stripped and the console smoked (the pcb trace for sound to the DIN connector vaporized and a number of other failures). I saved my money and bought another console and put that console aside since then, about 39 years. So their is sentimental value in getting this console running again ? Thanks for taking the time to read this! Any help is appreciated. Mark
  2. In the guts of it now. I'll link the pics here when done. For now, you can follow along on Facebook if you like. New pic each milestone. https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10206883911608295&id=1592441926&ref=bookmarks
  3. Morning all, poster from Ireland here, TLDR version: I am utterly clueless when it comes to AV hook-ups for the original Odyssey (and also when it comes power networking more generally). Would really appreciate if someone could review my Youtube/Wikipedia research, so I don't destroy a vintage console. The Console: I have an original Magnavox Odyssey (1972) that I picked up from another guy living in Ireland. I don't know much about Magnavox's distribution history (was the idea of PAL consoles even a thing back in 1972? ) but I'm assuming it's a standard NTSC unit that was imported, as there's a sticker on the bottom saying 120V/60Hz. The guy I bought it from just had it out on display, so there's no game power cord or antenna game switch with it, and I'm just trying to figure out what my best options are to power it on (without wearing out the battery compartment), and connecting it to a CRT. Power (Problem): In Ireland, we run the UK-style "Type G" electrical sockets, that output a standard supply of 230 volts AC (frequency 50Hz). I do have a step-down transformer but would prefer not to use it if possible, as it heats up very quickly. So I guess what I'm looking for is a) a modern power supply that can accept an input range of 100-240V, 50/60 HZ), b) that's well suited to the MA1 console, and c) that has those Irish/UK style pins. Like I said, I don't have one of the original power supplies that Magnavox manufactured for the Odyssey (I have been waiting for a few months for one to pop up on eBay with no joy...), but in an earlier thread linked below, @Clong80 notes that the specs on the original power supply are: INPUT 117 VAC 50/60HZ OUTPUT 9 volts 400ma 3.5mm mono headphone jack Tip positive for polarity Power (Solution?) So after a bit of online browsing, I found this website that sells modern power supply adapters for the Atari 2600. The specs on this unit are: 9V DC 1A Tip: 3.5mm jack (Centre tip positive) https://www.retrosales.com.au/collections/atari-power/products/accessory-power-supply-atari-2600-power-supply-adaptor-pack-9v So that will supply more current than the console needs; I know these numbers don't need to match exactly, but is the difference (9V, 1A vs 9V, 400ma) reasonable enough? I'd also need a standard travel adapter to convert the Australian plug to UK pin-style. Found this unit on Amazon ("This Adapter does not convert Voltage. Please make sure your device supports 220-240 Voltage.") Per Jakob Schuler on YouTube, it looks like the Magnavox Odyssey needs a 2.5mm tip (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NzXlJSa_VP4&t=6m22s), so I found this 3.5mm-to-2.5mm adapter on Amazon AV Hookup: I don't have one of the original antenna game switches with the hanging hooks, but my CRT doesn't accept NTSC RF anyway, so I don't think that would be the best option for me. However, it will accept NTSC through the composite ports. And I have an NTSC RF-to-composite conversion box, which works great either on its own or with composite switches. I've had no luck finding an original MA1 video cable like this one https://atariage.com/forums/uploads/monthly_06_2016/post-32949-0-81329000-1466475134.jpg On the TV end, the little RF adapters are obviously no problem to get from Amazon, but I understand that the other end which connects to the console is proprietary? (I'm not 100% sure about this). End of an entirely-too-long post Would be super grateful if anyone could advise me on 1) whether I've made any huge screw-ups in my choice of power accessories, and 2) how to find a video cable that will connect to the console Many thanks if you stuck through to the end of this post
  4. 'Morning all, Currently in the process of repairing a poorly 520STfm. This is a UK 520, and it has found itself in sunny Australia, where the voltage is the same (220-240v). Board is nice and clean, no issues with burst caps or any other visible damage. The main symptom has been no power. I am replacing the PSU caps based on the Techwiki Astec ASP34 (Mine is ASP34-2). After removing all of them, I note most of the PSU caps have leaked at some point, so I have cleaned up the bottom & top of the board. Please see the photos. One of them has explosively decompressed out the side ( C7 ) . A couple of components also look burnt and/or damaged. Could anyone please assist in identifying the components in the pictures so I can replace them? I have pointed to them the best my limited paint skills allow. Thanks in advance all.
  5. Hello, I have played my Atari Jaguar for a long time now, yet never bothered to fix the sound (which has been broken since I bought it) since almost none of the games I had had music anyways it never really bothered me as I'd just put on some headphones and jam out while playing jaguar. But now I just really want it fixed. I've opened it up before and soldered a new resistor, or current regulator of some kind (forgive me it was so many years ago) yet the problem persisted. However before I open it up to recheck everything I want to ask about the power supply. My power brick is an official Jaguar brick, but gets hot after it's been plugged in too long so I've always left it unplugged unless I'm playing. Is this common? And could it be why the sound shorted out in the first place? Any information would be much appreciated.
  6. Michael Matte sent me an article on how to troubleshoot a failing Astrocade power supply. Here is the article, followed by two photos that will help you follow the article. Keep in mind that working with the Astrocade's power supply could be dangerous; proceed with caution and be careful. Troubleshooting the Power Supply in the Bally/Astrocade Home Computer System by MCM Design February 21, 2018 A BRIEF: WHAT IS COVERED HERE This article is for the individual desiring to learn how to troubleshoot the power supply in the Bally/Astrocade home computer. Included is info and troubleshooting tips that may help locate a failure within the power supply. The following steps and recommendations will be covered in detail: - Plug black power XFMR into a low amp fast acting fused 120VAC source to help protect it and the motherboard from shorts to ground. - The pwr XFMR windings can be checked with an ohmmeter and an AC voltmeter. - The 8 rectifier diodes and 10,000uf cap C6 are not switched off by the motherboard power switch. - A basic check of the 8 rectifier diodes, using an ohmmeter, can be performed without de-soldering them. - Capacitors can be checked for shorts using an ohmmeter. - Voltage regulators with a normal input voltage, but, near or zero output voltage can be de-soldered and tested in a simplified breadboard circuit (or just replaced). - Down line caps can be checked for shorts using an ohmmeter. - A basic check on the power transistor Q1 can be performed using an ohmmeter. THE TROUBLESHOOTING DETAILS My first recommendation when troubleshooting a motherboard is to plug its black power transformer into a low amp FUSED 120VAC source. The fuse may help protect your motherboard and the black power XFMR in the event a short to ground occurs within the power supply or other areas. You probably will have to build a fused 120VAC source. Jameco Electronics sells a fast acting fuse as low as 250mA (part #69404), which is what I use in my hi-res Astrocade. A few weeks ago, I purchased a nonworking Astrocade from EBay. When I hooked it up and turned the power on, absolutely nothing happened on the TV screen. When I removed the console cover, I took just one voltage reading on a TTL chip. There was no +5V present. My second look at this Astrocade was to determine how many of the 4 DC supply voltages were actually present, if any. I just plugged in the black power XFMR into a power strip. Little did I know that the motherboard's power supply was shorted. As I was checking the 4 DC supply voltages and pwr XFMR sec AC voltages, I wasn't paying attention to the pwr XFMR which was heating up. This XFMR just kept overheating until its primary winding burned out. I learned the hard way to never again plug a Bally pwr XFMR into an unfused 120VAC source. THE POWER TRANSFORMER The XFMR's rms (root means square) ratings are indicated on its plastic housing along with the secondary wire color coding. The XFMR secondary has 3 windings wired in series. The two end windings are identical and typically rated 85mA@11.5VAC. The center winding is typically rated 1.0A@7.5VAC. The center winding is used for the motherboard's +5VDC supply. You can use an ohmmeter to check if there is a break (open) in the primary or the 3 sec windings. Use the ohmmeter RX1 range. An intact secondary winding will read nearly zero ohms and an intact primary winding will read a little higher in ohms. If the winding is open, the ohmmeter will remain at infinity. You can also check the sec AC voltages using an AC voltmeter. Disconnect the brown sec wire connector from the motherboard and tape it down. You will probably have to wind some bus wire or solid core hookup wire around the voltmeter test probe tips to make contact with the 4 color coded wire contacts. The 2 center contacts red-yel (or red-grn) are the center winding. Plug in the XFMR and measure the 3 sec voltages, end to ctr, ctr to ctr and the other end to ctr. Expect normal voltages to be a little higher than the XFMR's rated voltages because you are measuring these sec voltages with no load (disconnected). Note also because the sec windings are symmetrical, you can "turn around" that brown connector and plug it into the motherboard. It doesn't matter which way you plug it in. You can build a substitute power XFMR for the Bally black pwr XFMR. See my article in "The Arcadian", 1986, p.92-93 and 91, which is archived on the BallyAlley.com website. You can add a fuse to this substitute's primary winding. You can also place next to this substitute a quick connect breadboard strip. With some extra components like a sec fuse, bridge rectifier, caps, load resistor, etc., you can wire a test circuit to one of the end sec windings on the substitute XFMR or center winding depending on which motherboard component(s) you want to test. So, for example, you could de-solder a suspicious voltage regulator plus maybe a high capacitance electrolytic cap C6 or C1 and breadboard a test circuit to see if they are operating properly. This breadboard test technique would allow you to check specific components within the motherboard power supply without actually turning on the motherboard and risking further damage to motherboard components. I have ordered 2 Jameco XFMRs (part#2231152 and 102593) that may be well suited as a substitute XFMR. I plan to wire these 2 Jameco XFMRs and test/document this substitute configuration. I will also check to see if this configuration is ok for long term use with a motherboard. If the configuration is acceptable, the documentation will be submitted to the Bally Alley for review and possible archival. The documentation would include breadboard test circuit examples and more. FULL-WAVE RECTIFIERS The motherboard utilizes an unusual 8 diode rectifier configuration providing full-wave rectification to four power supplies, +12V (or 15V), +10V, +5V and -5VDC. Each full-wave rectifier converts the input alternating current (AC) into direct current (DC). The full-wave rectifier CR3, CR4, CR5 and CR6 is used for the +5V supply. In this case, the AC in one direction flows thru CR3 and back through CR6. The AC in the other direction flows through CR5 and back through CR4. If the secondary center winding produces 7.5VAC rms (as rated on the pwr XFMR plastic housing), the peak DC voltage would be 7.5x1.414=10.6V, excluding the diode drop off voltages. The 10,000uF capacitor C6 tries to maintain near peak voltage. When the +5V supply is operating, you will normally measure less than 10VDC across the C6 cap. The full-wave rectifier for the +12V and +10V supplies operates similarly in one direction flowing through CR1 and back through CR6 and in the other direction, flowing through CR7 and returning through CR4. The peak DC voltage would be (11.5+7.5)x1.414=26.9VDC, excluding diode drop off voltages. The normal operating voltage across the 1500uF C1 cap is under 25VDC. The voltage ratings indicated on the 1500uF C1 and 100uF C10 caps are normally 25V and 16V respectively. I have seen on the 10,000uF C6 cap ratings of 10V or 16V. I measured the voltages, IMMEDIATELY at power on, across the 3 caps on several motherboards with different pwr XFMRs and here are my observations: 1500uF C1, VC1=less than 25V 10,000uF C6, VC6=less than 10V 100uF C10, VC10=at or slightly less than 16V. The voltages across caps C1 and C6 will drop a little more when the motherboard runs for quite some time. The operating voltage for cap C10 is at or very close to its 16V rating and does not seem to change even if the motherboard runs for some time. Note that the 10,000uF cap C6 is NOT switched off by the motherboard power switch (see motherboard schematic). When the Bally black XFMR is plugged into a 120VAC source, the full-wave rectifier CR3 thru CR6 and cap C6 ARE ACTIVE. Also, you will likely see a voltage across cap C6 near or exceeding its 10V rating. I read that the voltage rating of a capacitor is the maximum amount of voltage that the capacitor can hold. Exceeding this voltage can damage the capacitor causing its dielectric to breakdown. It may be advisable to turn on the motherboard power switch IMMEDIATELY when you plug in the black power XFMR so that the voltage across C6 drops below 10VDC. Likewise, when you are finished using your Bally/Astrocade, turn off the motherboard and pull out the black XFMR (or turn off the power strip). Note also, when the motherboard power supply is turned off and the black pwr XFMR is removed from the 120VAC source, there is still a substantial charge across C6 and takes quite some time to discharge by itself. You can perform a basic check on a rectifier diode using an ohmmeter. A diode acts like a switch. When it is forward biased, the anode (P material) is positive with respect to its cathode (N material), it turns on and conducts current. When it is reverse biased, the cathode is positive with respect to its anode, it turns off. The cathode end of a diode is marked with a stripe. Checking a loose diode with an ohmmeter is easy. Just place the ohmmeter's test leads across each diode end, read the ohmmeter, swap the test leads and read the ohmmeter again. The ohmmeter will read either high or low ohms. A good diode will read low (only a few ohms, on) when forward biased and very high ohms (off) when reverse biased. A diode is shorted if both readings show zero ohms. A diode is also bad (open) if both readings indicate very high ohms (infinity). You can perform a basic check on all 8 rectifier diodes without de-soldering them and with the power off. Remove the brown pwr XFMR wire connector from the motherboard. Push the motherboard power switch to the "on" position. Look at the motherboard schematic (upper left) and use the ohmmeter to identify the line inputs 1 thru 4 and attach a label with these numbers to the metal shielding by those inputs. Place one ohmmeter test lead at the appropriate line number and the other test lead at the diode wired to that line number. Place that 2nd test lead on the diode's anode or cathode, depending on which diode you are checking. Read the ohmmeter, swap the test leads and read the ohmmeter again. If you read low and high ohms, the ohmmeter is indicating the diode is switching on and off. Repeat a similar procedure for all 8 diodes if so desired. CHECKING CAPACITORS FOR SHORTS It looks like you can check capacitors with an ohmmeter, to see if a cap is shorted. An analog ohmmeter would be preferable because you can watch the needle swing right or left. Your local hardware store sells inexpensive analog multimeters. The Astrocade mentioned above that I was troubleshooting had a shorted 15uF electrolytic C8 cap. My ohmmeter indicated it was shorted reading zero ohms. If you suspect an electrolytic cap on the motherboard might be shorted, turn off the power completely (including the black pwr XFMR) to the motherboard and use a voltmeter to see if it has a charge on it. Be careful the test probe tips don't touch other components or motherboard traces. To avoid possible shock when testing the 10,000uF cap, which may have a substantial charge on it, hook up one voltmeter test lead at a time. Avoid hooking up both test leads simultaneously with both hands. Also, don't let the pos test lead fall down onto any metal shielding which is grounded. If the cap does have a charge on it, it CAN'T be shorted. If the voltmeter does indicate the cap is charged, you can let the voltmeter completely discharge the cap. If the voltmeter reads zero volts across the cap initially, you can check it for a short. If you suspect an electrolytic cap is shorted and it has no charge on it, you can de-solder one end of it and raise that end away from the motherboard. An ohmmeter utilizes a small internal battery. So, if you check an electrolytic with an ohmmeter and that cap is not shorted and the cap will hold a charge, you will during the reading actually place a small charge on the cap. Observe polarities. You may have to put the red test lead in the ohmmeter neg jack and the black test lead in the pos jack because of that ohmmeter internal battery. Swapping the leads like this makes it less confusing (similar to testing a -5V supply). If the cap is not shorted and discharged and is able to hold a charge, you should see the ohmmeter needle briefly swing to zero and then to infinity. You can try this check just once, but then you will have to discharge the cap if you want to run another check on it. Practice this technique on a spare cap first until you get the technique established in your mind. I have tried this technique on a spare working 1000uF cap and also a 4700uF cap. I read that if an ohmmeter reads less than 500k ohms (when the needle stops swinging left) it may be leaking. Also, a damaged electrolytic cap may have a whitish deposit at the seal around the terminals. Voltage regulator input capacitors C2, C4, C8 and C11, if shorted, have the potential to burn out the black pwr XFMR. Caps C2 and C4 have a lower risk because they are wired to a series resistor. Cap C2 is likely wired to a 24 ohm, 1/2W resistor instead of a jumper as suggested on the schematic. Note Cap C8 (6.8 possibly 15uF) is wired to all 3 positive DC supplies. If cap C8 shorts, it will shut down all 3 of these supplies. Of course the 3 filter caps C1, C6 and C10 could short out and damage the pwr XFMR. This is why I highly recommend plugging the pwr XFMR into a fused 120VAC source, to help protect the XFMR and possibly other components from a short to ground. When I used my fused substitute XFMR on my Astrocade described above, the shorted C8 cap would blow out the 1A fuse in the XFMR primary. This particular substitute did have oversized XFMRS, but the substitute I plan to build mentioned above will be closer in size to the Bally black XFMR. The voltage regulator output caps C3, C5, C9, C12 and the downline "chip bypass" caps, if shorted, will at least, I believe, shutdown a voltage regulator which has some kind of internal short circuit protection. VOLTAGE REGULATORS AND DECOUPLING CAPACITORS I spent a little time on the internet trying to find some info regarding a voltage regulator's internal short circuit protection. I didn't have any luck finding info on this feature. At this time, I'm assuming it just attempts to protect the regulator should there be an output short to ground. I have seen a bad regulator with a normal input voltage, but no output voltage. A suspected bad voltage regulator could be removed from the motherboard and tested in a breadboarded test circuit. A shorted output cap or downline "chip bypass" cap would, I believe, yield a near zero voltage on the regulator's output. In the event you find a reg with no output voltage, it might be a good idea to remove the reg from the motherboard and then check the output line for a shorted cap as described above making sure first that the output line has no charge on it. If there is a little charge on the line, that's an indication no shorted cap is wired to the line. As far as I know, the +10V line has no electrolytic bypass caps wired to it. The other 3 DC supply lines do have some electrolytics wired to them, but they may not hold a charge for very long. POWER TRANSISTOR Q1 You can perform a basic check of Q1 using an ohmmeter. De-solder the end of the 240 ohm resistor R2 which will leave the base (B) of Q1 disconnected allowing you to check Q1 from the bottom of the motherboard. This transistor is a type NPN transistor and can be viewed as 2 diodes connected together at their anodes (P material) end. The joining of the two anodes would be the base (B) of Q1. You can check these 2 junctions, B-E and B-C just like checking a diode as described above. If you check the junction C-E and the ohmmeter indicates a short (zero ohms), say good-bye to your motherboard chips because the +5V power supply line most likely exceeded well over +5V which will zap the chips. REMOVE BOTTOM MOTHERBOARD SHIELDING One final recommendation is to remove the motherboard's bottom shielding panel when just taking test readings along the edge of the motherboard, even if you are not clipping a lead onto a component. I made a mistake and placed an uninsulated alligator clip on the pos (+) end of the 10,000uF cap C6 because I wanted to monitor its voltage when I switched on the motherboard power. While the motherboard power was on, the alligator clip fell and touched the metal shielding which is normally grounded. Ouch! I saw a very large spark. I was lucky because the Bally black power XFMR was plugged into my home built fused 120VAC receptacle. The 1A fuse on the XFMR primary winding blew and saved, I'm sure, my motherboard from damage. So, play it safe and remove that metal shielding. Then use a clip on jumper and ground the RF modulator metal housing to the NEG lead of that large 1500uF electrolytic C1 cap on the right side of the motherboard. Watch out you don't connect the jumper on C1's pos end. The two photos below show the locations of the 3 electrolytic filter caps within the power supply I would label as "caps of concern" because they operate close to their maximum voltage ratings. They are caps C1, C6 and C10 rated 1500uF, 10,000uF and 100uF respectively. End of document. Here are the close-up photos of Michael's Astrocade motherboard: Caps C6 and C1: Cap C10: I hope that this information proves helpful to those with failing Astrocades. Remember, working with power supplies can be dangerous; be careful! Adam
  7. I am working on a very corroded beige unit. I soaked the parts in citric acid solution to remove the rust am am now testing each part, starting with the power supply. The 12 and minus 5 volt rails seem fine, but the plus 5 volt rail takes about 30 seconds to come up and then stabilizes at 5.207 volts. This doesn’t seem correct. Unfortunately, TI used a complicated circuit for the plus 5 volt rail instead of a 7805. Anyone here willing to help me troubleshoot?
  8. hi all, I am new to this server and the Colecovision. I bought a colecovision last week and found out the power supply is faulty. Now i am located in the Netherlands (Europe) and i started looking for a new power supply. I couldnt find one and the col to usb thingy is out of produce. I found one power supply that would work for me, but with shipping the cost would be around 90€ to get it here. Does anyone know a better alternative? Gr Clint Geurts
  9. So I just set up my XEGS for the first time in a few years. Messed around with basic for about 10 minutes and then played two games for around 20 to 30 minutes. I went back to basic and every minute of two it would lock up on me. Resets didn’t do a thing I had to shut it off and turn it back on. Is this a power supply issue or something worse? See attached picture for power supply I’m currently using. And if it’s the power supply, well the funny thing is I almost ordered a new one from the Brewing Academy when placing my order for the ultimate cartridge. Thanks for any advice. I’ve been out of the 8-bit world for a long time.
  10. I recently bought a 7800 off eBay. It was working for a while but then it was working sporadically. Then just a few days ago not at all. I'm not experienced with electronics, but I opened it up to see if something would jump out at me, like blown capacitors, nothing. I finally examined the power supply or AC adapter. I noticed the cord was damaged. As frustrating as it is at least I know the problem now. The not knowing was frustrating me the must. I don't know what to do. Can the housing be opened? Should I attempt a repair? This seems to be a common failure point. I noticed a replacement power supply on eBay and it looks like it was repaired in the same location.
  11. As this came up in another thread, I am clarifying this for our California Denizens. This is pertaining directly to Title 20. Information gathered from (Energy Code Ace) Requirements Title 20 Section 1605.3(v)(6) requires workstations, rack-mounted workstations, mobile workstations, small-scale servers and high expandability computers manufactured on or after January 1, 2018 to meet all of the four following criteria: 1. Be powered by an internal power supply that meets or exceeds the standards in Title 20, Table V-9 (see below) or an external power supply that meets efficiency level VI as described in the International Efficiency Marking Protocol for External Power Supplies Version 3.0 (IEMP) 2013; Title 20, Section 1605.3(v) 2. Incorporate Energy-Efficient Ethernet functionality; 3. Transition connected displays into sleep mode within 15 minutes of user inactivity and 4. Transition the computer into either the computer sleep mode or computer off mode within 30 minutes of user inactivity. If the transition is to a computer sleep mode, that sleep mode shall either: a. Be a computer sleep mode as described in ACPI as S3 or b. Consume power less than or equal to 10 + 0.03 * C, where C is the system memory capacity in gigabytes minus 32 gigabytes (see Table V-6 in Title 20 Section 1605.3(v)) Small-scale servers and rack-mounted workstations are not required to comply with #4 above (see Title 20 Section 1605.3(v)(6)(A - D)) So, basically, my boss did not give me ALL the information. I think that the Retro Computing Community of California will be largely unaffected by this. Be careful selling power supplies. Make sure they conform to this code. Thanks for making me search it out @cbmeeks (which I do mean ? )
  12. Purchased a Fairchild Channel F model 1 and the power supply brick was busted open. Wires were ripped out of the transformer and is beyond repair unfortunately. If anyone has an extra power supply laying around or one from a parts console, please message me. I would like to purchase a used power supply.
  13. C64 Commodore 64 Deluxe Power Supply Saver bought for $50 will sell for $40 C64 Commodore 64 Deluxe Power Supply Saver Protect your vintage C64 by Ray CarlsenRay Carlsen, veteran Commodore repair technician, made this Computer Saver. The Computer Saver functions as a voltage limiter when plugged in-line between the C64 and the C64 power supply. The two LED's on the Saver case are indicators of the Power Supply status. The LED on the left monitors the 9VAC from the supply and it should be on all the time the Power Supply is plugged in to AC power, whether the computer is on or off. The other LED (marked "failsafe") is normally off. It only comes on if the Power Supply fails due to a shorted internal regulator. That fault is what damages chips in the computer, most often the RAM.
  14. My power is going out about every other use on my TI99/4a. The power comes on, I use it for five minutes to an hour, turn it off, then the computer will not turn back on for several hours. But it will turn on again the next day, and the cycle continues. If you were a bettin' man, would you say that was an internal or external PS problem?
  15. I already have the system but I need the hook ups, the power supply and composite cable as well as the sd2iec and the epyx fast load reloaded cartridge.
  16. So my 5200 has apparently given up the ghost and just refuses to turn on. I recall the last time it functioned (about a month ago was when I played it last) it took a couple of tries to get it to turn on, but eventually it worked perfectly fine and I was able to turn it off and on with ease as I switched out games. Now all of the sudden it doesn't want to turn on at all. I have had this 5200 for a few years, and it has worked great otherwise. At the moment I don't have anything to test the power supply itself. But I'm assuming it's the switchbox. When I was trying to turn it on I examined the switchbox after several attempts and noticed it smelled like burning plastic. It wasn't strong, but you could definitely smell it if you held it up to your nose. I took it apart and everything looks good, except for the part where you plug in the actual power supply. The part where you plug the console in - which was where it smelled like burning plastic the most when I examined it - seems okay. Attached are pics of the switchbox, which I have taken out of its shell to look at. As you can see, the part where you plug the power supply into (the black thing, I don't know the name of it) seems rusty and corroded all over. Would this be my problem? Could I take it off the switchboard and clean it up, or would it be best to just buy a new part? Also, what can I use to test out my power supply to make sure that's not what's causing the issue?
  17. So my 5200 has apparently given up the ghost and just refuses to turn on. I recall the last time it functioned (about a month ago was when I played it last) it took a couple of tries to get it to turn on, but eventually it worked perfectly fine and I was able to turn it off and on with ease as I switched out games. Now all of the sudden it doesn't want to turn on at all. I have had this 5200 for a few years, and it has worked great otherwise. At the moment I don't have anything to test the power supply itself. But I'm assuming it's the switchbox. When I was trying to turn it on I examined the switchbox after several attempts and noticed it smelled like burning plastic. It wasn't strong, but you could definitely smell it if you held it up to your nose. I took it apart and everything looks good, except for the part where you plug in the actual power supply. The part where you plug the console in - which was where it smelled like burning plastic the most when I examined it - seems okay. Attached are pics of the switchbox, which I have taken out of its shell to look at. As you can see, the part where you plug the power supply into (the black thing, I don't know the name of it) seems rusty and corroded all over. Would this be my problem? Could I take it off the switchboard and clean it up, or would it be best to just buy a new part? Also, what can I use to test out my power supply to make sure that's not what's causing the issue?
  18. I was gifted an Atari XEGS with a joystick and light gun, but sadly no power supply. I've searched around on eBay and can only find rather overpriced power supplies. I don't even need an authentic or original one, but does anyone know where I can find a power supply just so I can test that the unit actually works? Thanks!
  19. I added an article to BallyAlley.com called A Power Transformer Substitution for the Bally/Astrocade Computer System by Michael Matte (MCM Design). Michael wrote this article in April of 2018. If your original Bally power supply fails, and you have experience in electronics, then these detailed instructions with schematics and picture explain how to build a substitute power transformer. You can read the article in various formats, here: http://www.ballyalley.com/faqs/faqs.html#AstrocadePowerTransformerSubstitution Here is an example of the finished power supply (more pictures are included in the article): Thanks to Michael for writing this article. Enjoy! Adam
  20. Hi there! I just got an used Atari Flashback without its power supply, early today I got a power supply for Flashback consoles but I have doubts about to use both. The power supply is a KU28-9-200D model and output 9v DC 200mA and the console has a Batch Code: D10508 it's the only number or model number on the bottom label. I'm not sure if is a good idea plug the power supply to the console because this console says under plug 5V I don't want to plug it and blow away this poor thingy. So Is it save to use them? If is not Which Flashback console uses the power supply? And What power supply should I use with this console? If someone has the power supply model I'll appreciate to know it. Thank you guys, Have a happy!
  21. Since I have begun dabbling in programming for the Atari 2600, I have become interested in running a PAL system for testing purposes. I have one wood-grain 4-switch NTSC VCS, and there are multiple PAL VCS's for sale on eBay at reasonable prices. My main question is about displaying the signal. I obviously don't have a PAL CRT, and the only way to get one would be to pay a fortune to ship one from across the pond. Not to mention that I would need to power it with the proper voltage at 50Hz. I have heard that the Commodore 64 1080/1084 monitors will accept PAL signals, though (I think), but getting a PAL CRT is pretty much out of the question for now. I was thinking of instead getting a signal converter so I could display the picture on a NTSC CRT, something like in this video. It seems too good to be true, but could something as inexpensive as this converter be all I need? One other question. I noticed that my power supply converts from 110V 60Hz to 9v DC. If I plug a PAL system into a US wall outlet, will it work properly? Or will I need a different power supply? I would assume that both NTSC and PAL systems run at 9V, but I may be wrong.
  22. Since I have begun dabbling in programming for the Atari 2600, I have become interested in running a PAL system for testing purposes. I have one wood-grain 4-switch NTSC VCS, and there are multiple PAL VCS's for sale on eBay at reasonable prices. My main question is about displaying the signal. I obviously don't have a PAL CRT, and the only way to get one would be to pay a fortune to ship one from across the pond. Not to mention that I would need to power it with the proper voltage at 50Hz. I have heard that the Commodore 64 1080/1084 monitors will accept PAL signals, though (I think), but getting a PAL CRT is pretty much out of the question for now. I was thinking of instead getting a signal converter so I could display the picture on a NTSC CRT, something like in this video. It seems too good to be true, but could something as inexpensive as this converter be all I need? One other question. I noticed that my power supply converts from 110V 60Hz to 9v DC. If I plug a PAL system into a US wall outlet, will it work properly? Or will I need a different power supply? I would assume that both NTSC and PAL systems run at 9V, but I may be wrong.
  23. I have been playing with a recently acquired 1040 STE (my first STE in 25 years - cha-ching) and the case seems to get mighty warm to the touch above the PSU.., at least warmer than I remember back-in-the-day. How hot should the power supply be running? I've also had floppy read/write problems - accompanied with minor graphic glitches - but only after the computer been on for a few hours. I'm GUESSING this might be related to a failing PSU, (If I'm way outta whack thinking these issues might be related to the PSU, please let me know) I'm also a bit concerned with having a hot PSU sitting right next to the simms. (which I just replaced) I have other items I would like to acquire first, but if a new PSU is needed, I'll move it to the top of the list. I'd just hate to spend the money on the PSU only to find that that's just how hot they run, and that my other problems are elsewhere. Thanks in advance for the advice
  24. I am looking for an acoustic coupler power supply for the Atari 830 Modem, the TRS80 Interface II Modem, Cat Novation model CAT Novation 490190 modem, or TI-99/4A Phone Modem (part 490267-4). Note I am only looking for a single power supply, all of the listed modems are the same product with cases custom designed for various computer manufacturers. Preference would be for the Ti-99/4A branded modem power supply, or the Cat Novation part #901017 (this was the manufacturer of all of these variants) . Considering that this item no longer suits any real world purpose, I am looking in the $12-$15 US price range max. TIA
  25. I have decided, to reduce the number of adaptors I need, to buy an NTSC tv for NTSC consoles. I have a question though, would I need to buy a transformer? What is the difference between US and UK voltage? Thank you for any help.
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