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Guitarman

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  • 4 months later...

Simple Method to Defeat Obnoxious Tape Residue on Cartridges

 

I've had great success with this simple technique and wanted to share my results.  Recently I acquired a basketball cartridge in an eBay lot, and it had the dreaded masking tape residue on the main label (and some on the edge of the cartridge as well).  You all know what I'm talking about, that awful film that is basically dust that clings to the surface like grim death.  

Usually, you'll do more damage to the label or the surface you're trying to rescue than the tape you're trying to liberate it from.

 

Well, there is a proven and inexpensive solution.  Baby Oil (or plain mineral oil).  

 

Simply saturate the remaining tape with a cotton bud, then wait.  I let the cart sit overnight.  The oil won't evaporate or run (a thin, thorough layer anyway).   Over time it will penetrate the remaining tape and then you're in business.  

 

The next step, I gently rub the oil a bit with my finger then use a small piece of magic eraser (wet) to help lift the remaining crud.  Very gently, and with patience, you'll get it all.  The mineral oil (baby oil) won't harm carts or labels, and with a slightly damp rag and a drop of dish soap you can remove the remaining oil completely off the surface.

 

The obnoxious glue residue has been banished.  With minimal effort and expense.  This technique has been validated several times, and I have never had an issue with it.  Hope it helps out some other collectors.  Below, are my results.

 

Jeff

 

 

Before:

image.jpeg.5e4786ff757a69d7cdf78291771404df.jpeg

 

After:

 

image.jpeg.abf218c519764ee84b4d9908ea51a218.jpeg

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18 hours ago, atari-dna said:

Simple Method to Defeat Obnoxious Tape Residue on Cartridges

 

I've had great success with this simple technique and wanted to share my results.  Recently I acquired a basketball cartridge in an eBay lot, and it had the dreaded masking tape residue on the main label (and some on the edge of the cartridge as well).  You all know what I'm talking about, that awful film that is basically dust that clings to the surface like grim death.  

Usually, you'll do more damage to the label or the surface you're trying to rescue than the tape you're trying to liberate it from.

 

Well, there is a proven and inexpensive solution.  Baby Oil (or plain mineral oil).  

 

Simply saturate the remaining tape with a cotton bud, then wait.  I let the cart sit overnight.  The oil won't evaporate or run (a thin, thorough layer anyway).   Over time it will penetrate the remaining tape and then you're in business.  

 

The next step, I gently rub the oil a bit with my finger then use a small piece of magic eraser (wet) to help lift the remaining crud.  Very gently, and with patience, you'll get it all.  The mineral oil (baby oil) won't harm carts or labels, and with a slightly damp rag and a drop of dish soap you can remove the remaining oil completely off the surface.

 

The obnoxious glue residue has been banished.  With minimal effort and expense.  This technique has been validated several times, and I have never had an issue with it.  Hope it helps out some other collectors.  Below, are my results.

 

Jeff

 

 

Before:

image.jpeg.5e4786ff757a69d7cdf78291771404df.jpeg

 

After:

 

image.jpeg.abf218c519764ee84b4d9908ea51a218.jpeg

It's loads better ,but you can clearly still see where the label was, a touch of isopropyl (test small area first) should remove that outline.

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WD-40 does the trick without hurting what's underneath the adhesive. However you will have to put up with the odor which lasts for a while, but will fade over time.

 

WD-40.jpg.0013657ea9159345df0a1979a75908f4.jpg

 

This video shows how it works on sun baked double-sided tape residue, which looks similar to what the OP had on his cart, and is usually very difficult to remove.

 

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  • 1 year later...

I've been fixing, refurbishing and restoring vintage electronics for years and one of my go-to products for fixing broken plastic (mainly cases for consoles, computers and peripherals) has been JB weld. I still stand by it, but it does take a long curing time. But I found a Youtube video with an alternative that will cure in a very short time. The products used are super glue and cement powder (apparently Baking Soda works too). Below is the link to the video. Skip ahead to 4:20 to see the most relevant part for plastic cases. I have not tried it myself yet, but I intend to soon. The technique seen in the video for the repair is the same technique I use with JB Weld too.

 

 

Edited by Gunstar
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  • 3 weeks later...

I already made a really long post about it, but here's the grocery list for what I used for this before and after:

 

image.thumb.jpeg.c87ca1f7baf4e78b4334a6701060830a.jpegimage.thumb.jpeg.3741b6b83f98177305d7feb003619c8d.jpeg

 

  • Acetone to fuse broken pieces of plastic together - don't use nailpolish remover, as it has other junk in it that makes it less effective for the job 
  • Loctite Glass Glue for pieces that wouldn't weld with acetone 
  • JB Weld KwikWeld for the underside of the case, anywhere a repair was made 
  • JB Weld PlasticWeld putty to rebuild standoffs and other structural bits 
  • 120 and 220 grit sandpaper for obvious purposes
  • Rust-Oleum Automotive Primer: Filler & Sandable - gives the paint something to stick to and helps fill in gaps from repairs 
  • Rust-Oleum Universal Advanced Formula Pearl Metallic Paint & Primer (Sea Mist)- do at least 6 light coats, 3 minutes apart and don't touch it again for 24 hours. I did my spraying in my garage, with the doors open, on cardboard, with a box fan blowing over them as each coat dried. I did this to keep dust and bugs from landing on the thing, which was a problem I ran into, when trying to do this outside
  • Rust-Oleum Universal Advanced Formula Clear Top Coat - do light coats (however many for whatever finish you're seeking) 5 minutes apart. Use the fan for the first few hours after the last coat. Wait 72 hours before touching, if you can. I found that this continued to cure for at least a couple of days (even though the can indicates 24 hours) 
  • Printable Vinyl Sticker Paper: Matte Finish 

I had to make a lot of guesses during the restoration, and I hadn't seen any examples of such extensive casework to know if my attempts would even work. I hope this helps someone in the future!

43221835.avif

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13 hours ago, DustyCity said:

 

  • Acetone to fuse broken pieces of plastic together - don't use nailpolish remover, as it has other junk in it that makes it less effective for the job 
  • Loctite Glass Glue for pieces that wouldn't weld with acetone 
  • JB Weld KwikWeld for the underside of the case, anywhere a repair was made 
  • JB Weld PlasticWeld putty to rebuild standoffs and other structural bits 
  • 120 and 220 grit sandpaper for obvious purposes
  • Rust-Oleum Automotive Primer: Filler & Sandable - gives the paint something to stick to and helps fill in gaps from repairs 
  • Rust-Oleum Universal Advanced Formula Pearl Metallic Paint & Primer (Sea Mist)- do at least 6 light coats, 3 minutes apart and don't touch it again for 24 hours. I did my spraying in my garage, with the doors open, on cardboard, with a box fan blowing over them as each coat dried. I did this to keep dust and bugs from landing on the thing, which was a problem I ran into, when trying to do this outside
  • Rust-Oleum Universal Advanced Formula Clear Top Coat - do light coats (however many for whatever finish you're seeking) 5 minutes apart. Use the fan for the first few hours after the last coat. Wait 72 hours before touching, if you can. I found that this continued to cure for at least a couple of days (even though the can indicates 24 hours) 
  • Printable Vinyl Sticker Paper: Matte Finish 

I had to make a lot of guesses during the restoration, and I hadn't seen any examples of such extensive casework to know if my attempts would even work. I hope this helps someone in the future!

43221835.avif 16.71 kB · 0 downloads

 

I read your other post, Still looks like an 800 !! Good job

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