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Super Circus AtariAge (new WIP)


PacManPlus
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Hey Trebor:

 

As always, thanks for your input. I don't know how feasible it will be to have two different sets of motion for the different controllers, but the other stuff were things I was already going to tackle. :)

 

Working on the clown motion was what I meant by:

-Tweak difficulty, in the respect of how fast the clown moves on the screen, and where the clown hits the trampoline.

 

The original Circus Atari read the Y-values in from a table (i.e. it didn't calculate the clown's Y coordinate on the fly). Therefore, it had 5 unique bounces - that's all. One where the clown didn't hit any balloons, and four with varying degrees of speed. To get the game going, I copied those tables into this game. All Y coordinates started at line 161 ($A1) and worked upward from there. The Y-table where the clown didn't hit any balloons ended at line 36 ($24) which was too high for this version. I shortened it to 66 ($42). The others were left alone, but I knew they were all too fast.

 

Now, to modify this, I am using the function Y = SIN((3.14159265 / 2) * X) to get values between 0 and 1. This was as close as I could get to Atari's curve. I only plan on using more points to 'slow the clown down', so to speak. The only problem is, I have a feeling this curve will be to 'relaxed' and make the clown look like he's 'floating'.

If you or anyone has a better function to use that can get closer to Atari's original, I'm all ears.

 

Thanks again :)

Bob

 

I expect they used gravity - I remember getting really excited the first time I got proper jumps into a platform game....

 

it will need playing with the constants, but something like:

 

y=K*x-g*(X^2)

 

in metres per second squared (m/s^2) g is ~9.81 if you scale that appropriately for your game (say assume the clown is 1.5 metres tall and convert that to pixels), and play with K you should get a nice formula.

 

edit: spelling

 

edit again: sorry been a long time since I did this - but basically you are working with a value for acceleration (due to gravity), but you might well want to also have a maximum velocity (due to wind resistance!?)

 

basically you start of with an initial velocity caused by the jump/bounce,

say v=+5 m/s

 

each frame you add the acceleration to that: g=-9.81 m/s^2, say your frames are every 60th of a second (NTSC):

 

v=v-9.81/60 every frame

 

but you may want to cap v at a certain negative value (I think you'll probably be alright, because the clown never falls below his starting point, so shouldn't get too fast)

 

and then each frame you add the velocity to the y co-ordinate:

 

y=y+v/60 (again divide by 60 because I've been working in per second)

 

I'm probably making this more complicated than it needs to be, and if you just want to generate tables, I think you can use the original formula I said: y=K*x - g*(x^2) and just play with the constants 'til it looks right.

Edited by eshu
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Just got an idea for a power-up while playing arkanoid plus on the Wii...

 

Safety Net..

 

it will place a one use safety at the bottom of the screen so if a clown gets past the player the safety net will save them for one try.

 

Or you could even have one with a timer.. :D

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Thanks, guys for the compliments and the ideas.

 

Unfortunately, I'm having a pretty big issue with this gravity thing.

 

I need to have one run that starts from $A1 (161) to $42 (66) with a varying number of 'Y' intersections, and four runs that start from $A1 all the way up to 0, again with varying numbers of 'Y' intersections.

 

These are the values from the original game (note these are 'Y' only values for the bouncing clown that start from the bottom of the screen to the top. The game just reverses it for the way down. BTW when the program hits the '$00' it knows to reverse direction):

        .byte $A1,$98,$92,$8C,$87,$81,$7C,$77 ; NORMAL BOUNCE (NOT HITTING ANYTHING)
        .byte $72,$6D,$68,$64,$5F,$5B,$57,$53
        .byte $4F,$4B,$48,$45,$42,$3F,$3C,$3A
        .byte $37,$35,$33,$31,$2F,$2D,$2B,$2A
        .byte $29,$28,$27,$26,$25,$25,$24,$00

        .byte $A1,$98,$92,$8C,$87,$81,$7B,$76 ; HIGH BOUNCE 1 - SLOW
        .byte $71,$6C,$67,$62,$5D,$59,$54,$50
        .byte $4B,$47,$43,$3F,$3B,$38,$34,$31
        .byte $2D,$2A,$27,$24,$21,$1E,$1C,$19
        .byte $17,$15,$12,$10,$0F,$0D,$0B,$0A
        .byte $08,$07,$06,$04,$03,$02,$01,$00

        .byte $A1,$98,$91,$8A,$84,$7D,$77,$71 ; HIGH BOUNCE 2 - A LITTLE FASTER
        .byte $6B,$65,$60,$5A,$55,$50,$4B,$46
        .byte $41,$3D,$38,$34,$30,$2C,$29,$25
        .byte $22,$1F,$1B,$18,$16,$13,$11,$0F
        .byte $0C,$0B,$09,$07,$06,$04,$03,$02
        .byte $01,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00

        .byte $A1,$98,$8F,$87,$7E,$76,$6E,$67 ; HIGH BOUNCE - MEDIUM SPEED
        .byte $60,$59,$52,$4B,$45,$3F,$3A,$34
        .byte $2F,$2A,$26,$21,$1D,$19,$16,$12
        .byte $0F,$0C,$0A,$08,$06,$04,$03,$02
        .byte $01,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00

        .byte $A1,$98,$8E,$84,$7B,$73,$6A,$62 ; HIGH BOUNCE - FAST SPEED
        .byte $5A,$52,$4B,$44,$3E,$37,$31,$2C
        .byte $27,$22,$1D,$19,$15,$11,$0E,$0B
        .byte $08,$06,$04,$02,$01,$00,$00,$00

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Thanks, guys for the compliments and the ideas.

 

Unfortunately, I'm having a pretty big issue with this gravity thing.

 

I need to have one run that starts from $A1 (161) to $42 (66) with a varying number of 'Y' intersections, and four runs that start from $A1 all the way up to 0, again with varying numbers of 'Y' intersections.

 

These are the values from the original game (note these are 'Y' only values for the bouncing clown that start from the bottom of the screen to the top. The game just reverses it for the way down. BTW when the program hits the '$00' it knows to reverse direction):

        .byte $A1,$98,$92,$8C,$87,$81,$7C,$77 ; NORMAL BOUNCE (NOT HITTING ANYTHING)
        .byte $72,$6D,$68,$64,$5F,$5B,$57,$53
        .byte $4F,$4B,$48,$45,$42,$3F,$3C,$3A
        .byte $37,$35,$33,$31,$2F,$2D,$2B,$2A
        .byte $29,$28,$27,$26,$25,$25,$24,$00

        .byte $A1,$98,$92,$8C,$87,$81,$7B,$76 ; HIGH BOUNCE 1 - SLOW
        .byte $71,$6C,$67,$62,$5D,$59,$54,$50
        .byte $4B,$47,$43,$3F,$3B,$38,$34,$31
        .byte $2D,$2A,$27,$24,$21,$1E,$1C,$19
        .byte $17,$15,$12,$10,$0F,$0D,$0B,$0A
        .byte $08,$07,$06,$04,$03,$02,$01,$00

        .byte $A1,$98,$91,$8A,$84,$7D,$77,$71 ; HIGH BOUNCE 2 - A LITTLE FASTER
        .byte $6B,$65,$60,$5A,$55,$50,$4B,$46
        .byte $41,$3D,$38,$34,$30,$2C,$29,$25
        .byte $22,$1F,$1B,$18,$16,$13,$11,$0F
        .byte $0C,$0B,$09,$07,$06,$04,$03,$02
        .byte $01,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00

        .byte $A1,$98,$8F,$87,$7E,$76,$6E,$67 ; HIGH BOUNCE - MEDIUM SPEED
        .byte $60,$59,$52,$4B,$45,$3F,$3A,$34
        .byte $2F,$2A,$26,$21,$1D,$19,$16,$12
        .byte $0F,$0C,$0A,$08,$06,$04,$03,$02
        .byte $01,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00

        .byte $A1,$98,$8E,$84,$7B,$73,$6A,$62 ; HIGH BOUNCE - FAST SPEED
        .byte $5A,$52,$4B,$44,$3E,$37,$31,$2C
        .byte $27,$22,$1D,$19,$15,$11,$0E,$0B
        .byte $08,$06,$04,$02,$01,$00,$00,$00

 

Hi,

 

I've been trying to fathom exactly the equations for those curves and I can't quite do it. I've attached a spreadsheet that will calculate almost perfect matches. The values I'm getting are:

 

$A1,$98,$92,$8C,$87,$81,$7C,$77,

$72,$6D,$68,$64,$5F,$5B,$57,$53,

$4F,$4C,$48,$45,$42,$3F,$3C,$3A,

$37,$35,$33,$31,$2F,$2D,$2B,$2A,

$29,$28,$27,$26,$25,$25,$24

 

$A1,$98,$92,$8C,$87,$81,$7B,$76,

$71,$6C,$67,$62,$5D,$59,$54,$50,

$4B,$47,$43,$3F,$3B,$38,$34,$31,

$2D,$2A,$27,$24,$21,$1E,$1C,$19,

$17,$14,$12,$10,$0E,$0D,$0B,$09,

$08,$06,$05,$04,$03,$02,$01

 

$A1,$98,$91,$8A,$84,$7D,$77,$71,

$6B,$65,$60,$5A,$55,$50,$4B,$46,

$41,$3D,$39,$34,$30,$2D,$29,$25,

$22,$1F,$1C,$19,$16,$13,$11,$0F,

$0C,$0B,$09,$07,$06,$04,$03,$02,

$01

 

$A1,$98,$8F,$87,$7E,$76,$6E,$67,

$60,$59,$52,$4B,$45,$3F,$3A,$34,

$2F,$2A,$26,$21,$1D,$19,$16,$12,

$0F,$0D,$0A,$08,$06,$04,$03,$02,

$01

 

$A1,$98,$8E,$85,$7B,$73,$6A,$62,

$5A,$52,$4B,$44,$3E,$37,$31,$2C,

$27,$22,$1D,$19,$15,$11,$0E,$0B,

$08,$06,$04,$02,$01

 

If you experiment with the values of L (Length) and H (Height) I think you should be able to generate all the curves you need.

 

Cheers,

Eshu

forpmp.xls

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Thanks, guys for the compliments and the ideas.

 

Unfortunately, I'm having a pretty big issue with this gravity thing.

 

I need to have one run that starts from $A1 (161) to $42 (66) with a varying number of 'Y' intersections, and four runs that start from $A1 all the way up to 0, again with varying numbers of 'Y' intersections.

 

These are the values from the original game (note these are 'Y' only values for the bouncing clown that start from the bottom of the screen to the top. The game just reverses it for the way down. BTW when the program hits the '$00' it knows to reverse direction):

		.byte $A1,$98,$92,$8C,$87,$81,$7C,$77 ; NORMAL BOUNCE (NOT HITTING ANYTHING)
		.byte $72,$6D,$68,$64,$5F,$5B,$57,$53
		.byte $4F,$4B,$48,$45,$42,$3F,$3C,$3A
		.byte $37,$35,$33,$31,$2F,$2D,$2B,$2A
		.byte $29,$28,$27,$26,$25,$25,$24,$00

		.byte $A1,$98,$92,$8C,$87,$81,$7B,$76 ; HIGH BOUNCE 1 - SLOW
		.byte $71,$6C,$67,$62,$5D,$59,$54,$50
		.byte $4B,$47,$43,$3F,$3B,$38,$34,$31
		.byte $2D,$2A,$27,$24,$21,$1E,$1C,$19
		.byte $17,$15,$12,$10,$0F,$0D,$0B,$0A
		.byte $08,$07,$06,$04,$03,$02,$01,$00

		.byte $A1,$98,$91,$8A,$84,$7D,$77,$71 ; HIGH BOUNCE 2 - A LITTLE FASTER
		.byte $6B,$65,$60,$5A,$55,$50,$4B,$46
		.byte $41,$3D,$38,$34,$30,$2C,$29,$25
		.byte $22,$1F,$1B,$18,$16,$13,$11,$0F
		.byte $0C,$0B,$09,$07,$06,$04,$03,$02
		.byte $01,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00

		.byte $A1,$98,$8F,$87,$7E,$76,$6E,$67 ; HIGH BOUNCE - MEDIUM SPEED
		.byte $60,$59,$52,$4B,$45,$3F,$3A,$34
		.byte $2F,$2A,$26,$21,$1D,$19,$16,$12
		.byte $0F,$0C,$0A,$08,$06,$04,$03,$02
		.byte $01,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00,$00

		.byte $A1,$98,$8E,$84,$7B,$73,$6A,$62 ; HIGH BOUNCE - FAST SPEED
		.byte $5A,$52,$4B,$44,$3E,$37,$31,$2C
		.byte $27,$22,$1D,$19,$15,$11,$0E,$0B
		.byte $08,$06,$04,$02,$01,$00,$00,$00

 

Hi,

 

I've been trying to fathom exactly the equations for those curves and I can't quite do it. I've attached a spreadsheet that will calculate almost perfect matches. The values I'm getting are:

 

$A1,$98,$92,$8C,$87,$81,$7C,$77,

$72,$6D,$68,$64,$5F,$5B,$57,$53,

$4F,$4C,$48,$45,$42,$3F,$3C,$3A,

$37,$35,$33,$31,$2F,$2D,$2B,$2A,

$29,$28,$27,$26,$25,$25,$24

 

$A1,$98,$92,$8C,$87,$81,$7B,$76,

$71,$6C,$67,$62,$5D,$59,$54,$50,

$4B,$47,$43,$3F,$3B,$38,$34,$31,

$2D,$2A,$27,$24,$21,$1E,$1C,$19,

$17,$14,$12,$10,$0E,$0D,$0B,$09,

$08,$06,$05,$04,$03,$02,$01

 

$A1,$98,$91,$8A,$84,$7D,$77,$71,

$6B,$65,$60,$5A,$55,$50,$4B,$46,

$41,$3D,$39,$34,$30,$2D,$29,$25,

$22,$1F,$1C,$19,$16,$13,$11,$0F,

$0C,$0B,$09,$07,$06,$04,$03,$02,

$01

 

$A1,$98,$8F,$87,$7E,$76,$6E,$67,

$60,$59,$52,$4B,$45,$3F,$3A,$34,

$2F,$2A,$26,$21,$1D,$19,$16,$12,

$0F,$0D,$0A,$08,$06,$04,$03,$02,

$01

 

$A1,$98,$8E,$85,$7B,$73,$6A,$62,

$5A,$52,$4B,$44,$3E,$37,$31,$2C,

$27,$22,$1D,$19,$15,$11,$0E,$0B,

$08,$06,$04,$02,$01

 

If you experiment with the values of L (Length) and H (Height) I think you should be able to generate all the curves you need.

 

Cheers,

Eshu

 

First of all, I'm pretty excited about applying some of my engineering education to assist in the development of a great video game, hah! Second, I'd like to clarify that I'm a chemical engineer with marginal computer programming knowledge so I'm trying to interpret PacManPlus' original post to the best of my ability. Correct me if I'm wrong, but it sounds like a simple X-Y coordinate data table is needed that accurately reflects the physics of projectile motion with gravity as the only force acting on the object. This coordinate data would then be converted into hexadecimal for use in the computer program. If that's the case, then hopefully this spreadsheet will come in handy.

 

Rather than attempting to reverse engineer the original programmer's formula(s), I set up a spreadsheet that utilizes the parametric form for projectile motion. This allows you to adjust variables for initial velocity, launch angle and time interval between coordinates. It sounds like only the first half of the projectile path is needed, as the descent would merely be the opposite of the ascent. In that case, obtaining only the first half of the curve requires a little iteration of the time interval once the initial velocity and launch angle variables are set. There is a non-iterative approach that utilizes the tangent, or derivative, of the projectile motion curve to pinpoint the exact apex of the curve. I doubt that high level of accuracy is required though since these values have to be converted to integers and then hexadecimal at some point, so I chose to not include that in the spreadsheet.

 

From reading some previous posts, there were some ideas thrown around about wind resistance and varying the velocity of the clown while in motion. This spreadsheet doesn't take into account any of that and from my experience playing Circus Atari, I'm pretty sure the original programmer didn't build that in either. In this scenario, the initial velocity stays constant throughout the entire jump and if gravity is the only force acting on the clown, which is also constant, there are no other variables which will accelerate/decelerate the clown while in motion.

 

I do think the launch angle varied along with velocity, although I couldn't tell you how that was incorporated without intimate knowledge of the program. For example, when the play field is clear of almost all balloons, you can get stuck in a pattern where the clowns jump straight up and down without hitting any objects. If you move the springboard a little to the left or right, this will usually knock the clowns out of that pattern and get them going at an angle again. That probably involves the hit detection and location between the clown and the springboard, but this spreadsheet does allow you an infinite number of velocities and launch angles so feel free to play around until you get something that mimics the original paths the best.

 

Please let me know if you find this helpful or have any other questions about how to manipulate the spreadsheet.

Projectile.xls

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First of all, I'm pretty excited about applying some of my engineering education to assist in the development of a great video game, hah! Second, I'd like to clarify that I'm a chemical engineer with marginal computer programming knowledge so I'm trying to interpret PacManPlus' original post to the best of my ability. Correct me if I'm wrong, but it sounds like a simple X-Y coordinate data table is needed that accurately reflects the physics of projectile motion with gravity as the only force acting on the object. This coordinate data would then be converted into hexadecimal for use in the computer program. If that's the case, then hopefully this spreadsheet will come in handy.

 

Rather than attempting to reverse engineer the original programmer's formula(s), I set up a spreadsheet that utilizes the parametric form for projectile motion. This allows you to adjust variables for initial velocity, launch angle and time interval between coordinates. It sounds like only the first half of the projectile path is needed, as the descent would merely be the opposite of the ascent. In that case, obtaining only the first half of the curve requires a little iteration of the time interval once the initial velocity and launch angle variables are set. There is a non-iterative approach that utilizes the tangent, or derivative, of the projectile motion curve to pinpoint the exact apex of the curve. I doubt that high level of accuracy is required though since these values have to be converted to integers and then hexadecimal at some point, so I chose to not include that in the spreadsheet.

 

From reading some previous posts, there were some ideas thrown around about wind resistance and varying the velocity of the clown while in motion. This spreadsheet doesn't take into account any of that and from my experience playing Circus Atari, I'm pretty sure the original programmer didn't build that in either. In this scenario, the initial velocity stays constant throughout the entire jump and if gravity is the only force acting on the clown, which is also constant, there are no other variables which will accelerate/decelerate the clown while in motion.

 

I do think the launch angle varied along with velocity, although I couldn't tell you how that was incorporated without intimate knowledge of the program. For example, when the play field is clear of almost all balloons, you can get stuck in a pattern where the clowns jump straight up and down without hitting any objects. If you move the springboard a little to the left or right, this will usually knock the clowns out of that pattern and get them going at an angle again. That probably involves the hit detection and location between the clown and the springboard, but this spreadsheet does allow you an infinite number of velocities and launch angles so feel free to play around until you get something that mimics the original paths the best.

 

Please let me know if you find this helpful or have any other questions about how to manipulate the spreadsheet.

I think I smell a rocket scientist...
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First of all, I'm pretty excited about applying some of my engineering education to assist in the development of a great video game, hah! Second, I'd like to clarify that I'm a chemical engineer with marginal computer programming knowledge so I'm trying to interpret PacManPlus' original post to the best of my ability. Correct me if I'm wrong, but it sounds like a simple X-Y coordinate data table is needed that accurately reflects the physics of projectile motion with gravity as the only force acting on the object. This coordinate data would then be converted into hexadecimal for use in the computer program. If that's the case, then hopefully this spreadsheet will come in handy.

 

Rather than attempting to reverse engineer the original programmer's formula(s), I set up a spreadsheet that utilizes the parametric form for projectile motion. This allows you to adjust variables for initial velocity, launch angle and time interval between coordinates. It sounds like only the first half of the projectile path is needed, as the descent would merely be the opposite of the ascent. In that case, obtaining only the first half of the curve requires a little iteration of the time interval once the initial velocity and launch angle variables are set. There is a non-iterative approach that utilizes the tangent, or derivative, of the projectile motion curve to pinpoint the exact apex of the curve. I doubt that high level of accuracy is required though since these values have to be converted to integers and then hexadecimal at some point, so I chose to not include that in the spreadsheet.

 

From reading some previous posts, there were some ideas thrown around about wind resistance and varying the velocity of the clown while in motion. This spreadsheet doesn't take into account any of that and from my experience playing Circus Atari, I'm pretty sure the original programmer didn't build that in either. In this scenario, the initial velocity stays constant throughout the entire jump and if gravity is the only force acting on the clown, which is also constant, there are no other variables which will accelerate/decelerate the clown while in motion.

 

I do think the launch angle varied along with velocity, although I couldn't tell you how that was incorporated without intimate knowledge of the program. For example, when the play field is clear of almost all balloons, you can get stuck in a pattern where the clowns jump straight up and down without hitting any objects. If you move the springboard a little to the left or right, this will usually knock the clowns out of that pattern and get them going at an angle again. That probably involves the hit detection and location between the clown and the springboard, but this spreadsheet does allow you an infinite number of velocities and launch angles so feel free to play around until you get something that mimics the original paths the best.

 

Please let me know if you find this helpful or have any other questions about how to manipulate the spreadsheet.

I think I smell a rocket scientist...

 

I don't think you want me working at NASA. icon_twisted.gif I'm fairly new to AtariAge but I think this is a great community and happy to help in any way I can. I have to admit, I am a little envious of computer programmers' skills especially when it comes to creating awesome games like this.

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I don't think you want me working at NASA. icon_twisted.gif I'm fairly new to AtariAge but I think this is a great community and happy to help in any way I can. I have to admit, I am a little envious of computer programmers' skills especially when it comes to creating awesome games like this.

I count missiles as rockets. :ponder:

 

I admire those with the stick-to-it-iveness to do this. I've done programming in a number of different languages and environments but I just don't have what it takes to focus on writing a game.

 

Circus is by far one of my favorite games. One of these days I need to work on a Circus inspired controller that I prototyped a few years ago. Too much real world in my day.

Edited by BigO
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@ashu and atariappleman: thanks for the help, with those formulas (slightly modified) I wrote a C# program to spit out the exact tables to I can copy and paste them into the source code. I wanted to get close, so 1 Scanline off in either direction didn't concern me. If the new binary that I will be posting tonight still seems hard, I can make adjustments very easily by modifying the number of 'slices' to a larger number (so the clown moves slower).

 

Ok - here is what I have completed:

- Allow button press or joystick movement to skip the title screen

- Allow 'Select' button to scroll through the options (so you don't need to connect the joystick first if you are using a paddle)

- Slightly slowed down the clown's movement - hopefully this might be a little easier.

- Fixed the bonus points that add for each line cleared

- as the game progresses, the number of successful bounces that advance to the faster speed decreases for more hectic play. :twisted:

- Additional side bumpers (like the original Circus game)

 

What's left?

- Bonus Rounds

- Sound

- Bonus Item that flies at the top of the screen

- Cut Scenes (possibly)

- Safety Net power up (possibly). It would replace the 'G' power up.

 

Binaries tonight.

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@ashu and atariappleman: thanks for the help, with those formulas (slightly modified) I wrote a C# program to spit out the exact tables to I can copy and paste them into the source code. I wanted to get close, so 1 Scanline off in either direction didn't concern me. If the new binary that I will be posting tonight still seems hard, I can make adjustments very easily by modifying the number of 'slices' to a larger number (so the clown moves slower).

 

Ok - here is what I have completed:

- Allow button press or joystick movement to skip the title screen

- Allow 'Select' button to scroll through the options (so you don't need to connect the joystick first if you are using a paddle)

- Slightly slowed down the clown's movement - hopefully this might be a little easier.

- Fixed the bonus points that add for each line cleared

- as the game progresses, the number of successful bounces that advance to the faster speed decreases for more hectic play. :twisted:

- Additional side bumpers (like the original Circus game)

 

What's left?

- Bonus Rounds

- Sound

- Bonus Item that flies at the top of the screen

- Cut Scenes (possibly)

- Safety Net power up (possibly). It would replace the 'G' power up.

 

Binaries tonight.

Awesome updates! Can't wait to try it out! :)

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@ashu and atariappleman: thanks for the help, with those formulas (slightly modified) I wrote a C# program to spit out the exact tables to I can copy and paste them into the source code. I wanted to get close, so 1 Scanline off in either direction didn't concern me. If the new binary that I will be posting tonight still seems hard, I can make adjustments very easily by modifying the number of 'slices' to a larger number (so the clown moves slower).

 

Ok - here is what I have completed:

- Allow button press or joystick movement to skip the title screen

- Allow 'Select' button to scroll through the options (so you don't need to connect the joystick first if you are using a paddle)

- Slightly slowed down the clown's movement - hopefully this might be a little easier.

- Fixed the bonus points that add for each line cleared

- as the game progresses, the number of successful bounces that advance to the faster speed decreases for more hectic play. :twisted:

- Additional side bumpers (like the original Circus game)

 

What's left?

- Bonus Rounds

- Sound

- Bonus Item that flies at the top of the screen

- Cut Scenes (possibly)

- Safety Net power up (possibly). It would replace the 'G' power up.

 

Binaries tonight.

 

As Promised (but a day late)...

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@ashu and atariappleman: thanks for the help, with those formulas (slightly modified) I wrote a C# program to spit out the exact tables to I can copy and paste them into the source code. I wanted to get close, so 1 Scanline off in either direction didn't concern me. If the new binary that I will be posting tonight still seems hard, I can make adjustments very easily by modifying the number of 'slices' to a larger number (so the clown moves slower).

 

Regarding clown speed: If there's room when it's all said and done, do you think it would be possible to include an unrealistically slow mode for kids?

 

I have been meaning to look into hacking the 2600 Circus to see if that could be done. I was guessing it would be tricky to do so hadn't looked into it in detail.

Edited by BigO
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Now that the paddle option is working - what about some sort of 4 player mode? Maybe 2 vs 2 with each team member controlling left and right movement? Maybe its too late in the day for that...

 

4 player options or not I'd be up for a PAL cartridge of this...have Pacman Collection already.

Edited by davyK
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Now that the paddle option is working - what about some sort of 4 player mode? Maybe 2 vs 2 with each team member controlling left and right movement? Maybe its too late in the day for that...

 

4 player options or not I'd be up for a PAL cartridge of this...have Pacman Collection already.

A four player simultaneous mode would be awesome! Not sure if it can be done though :ponder:

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Sorry guys - didn't mean for that to sound like something was wrong... It's just with the buying / selling / moving thing is taking all of my time, and I'm also having issues at work. :( Hopefully once I get down to Florida I'll have more time.

 

Thank you for the good wishes anyway!

Bob

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