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A lesson learned too late - Always backup your programs. :)


Diecrusher
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I got back into the TI about a year ago. I picked up an old beat-up PEB then and thus began my renewed interest in this machine for the first time since 1983 when I was still in High School.

 

I sure took my time but in the last year I've managed to get quite a few goodies and have done a full restore on that sad PEB and have done some mods with the great help of Ksarul, Fritz442 and others! Pictures soon to follow. :)

 

Anyways, one of the main reasons I picked up again on the TI is that I found some old tapes of games, etc. I tried writing back-in-the-day that I really wanted to load up and see again but I kept putting it off until I had the hardware all set the way

I wanted. I know, silly but that's me! Gotta get all of the ducks in a row. :)

 

I first started with all of the cassettes that had the programs I had typed in from magazines, etc. They all read fine and then I transferred them all to my PC for use with the various emulators. Worked fantastic.

 

Then I got to the good stuff and couldn't wait to load the tapes with all of my original stuff. Put in the cassette, hit play but wasn't greeted with the familiar modem noises but instead MUSIC??!! Arghhhh! Mom or Dad must have somehow grabbed these cassettes and copied over them even though I HAD THEM LABELED!!! Rats, they must have thought that I was done with them and it wasn't anything important anyways.

 

Hey, what were you guys doing in my stuff anyways!!!

 

Too bad neither of them aren't around anymore to scold about this great tragedy. :x I'd rather they could still here then those tapes anyways.................. :(

Edited by Diecrusher
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I know the feeling. My dad had written several small accounting programs for my grandpa's furniture business "On the Spot Furniture Repair" in BASIC. Grandma had the CLEARLY LABELED tapes in her basement (along with a ton of other cool stuff) and a couple years ago, I retrieved them. Went to load one up and I was greeted with: "...best hits of the 70s, 80s, and today.... Step by step, ooh baby--Gonna get to you girl!...."

 

My big sister had made a radio mix tape of New Kids on the Block, Bel Biv Devoe, Wilson Phillips, and Milli Vanilli.

 

Needless to say, I felt the same way you did.

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Back in the day I lost 2 things. One was a graphics demonstration program. Drew all sorts of lines and patterns and things. It was my fault because I believe I was too hasty with swapping disks and ended up with a mis-written catalog. The system had the catalog from another disk in memory and used that to overwrite where the demo was. Eventually, now, I found some of the listings and recreated the program in good faith. It's all there, but in different order.

 

The other thing was a picture of a happy dick we drew. I have no idea where or how it got lost. Unusual in just that one file ended up missing. I don't believe it was any of my buddies that erased it or confiscated it. They helped make it and they all had copies. And my parents and grandparents were complete idiots when it came to computers. Or were they? I could assume they stole the disk and threw it out. I wouldn't know for sure because I had thousands of disks at the time. At least 2000.

 

There's the possibility the dick pic is still in some un-opened and un-searched-through split-disk or compressed-disk "archives" I made in a desperate last-minute attempt to conserve disk space to cram more WaReZ into my exponentially growing. But I'm too lazy to search through them all right now.

 

Mind you this was all in the Apple II ecosphere. I never got into TI until way late in the game, and even then only cursorily.

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I had done the work of moving most of my cassette software to disk back in the 80's, so fortunately I preserved most everything.

 

My regret is for other people's software...

 

In 1990, I met Quinton Tormanen at the TI Faire in Portland Oregon. He showed me one of the games he had been working on, a Gauntlet clone called Gold Vault that was fantastic! It was never released though and when I got in contact with him a few years ago he said he'd lost all his old TI software some time ago. Including a Wizardry crpg he was working on... I wish I had asked for a copy back at the faire!

 

The other was a childhood friend of mine, who also had a TI. I got a simple road game he wrote in BASIC somewhere, but one of his big projects was a disk based action adventure game called Food Frenzy. I also ran into him a few years back, and he said all his TI stuff was left behind when he moved out of his parents home, and he lost everything. I wish I'd gotten a working copy at the time! He had drawn up some pretty good graphics. Sadly he had also become a creepy weird fellow who likely has an FBI file given the nature of his political rants...

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In 1990, I met Quinton Tormanen at the TI Faire in Portland Oregon...

 

If << THIS LINK >> can be trusted, he still lives in Battle Ground, WA. Did anyone know him well enough to want to contact him? Who knows, he may be old enough now to have developed a little "TI nostalgia". If you know his email address, one could always 'chum the waters' by sending him a copy of Tursi's Classic 99 and a link to our little corner of Atari Age. If he's interested, a guy with his talent might spice things up here even more.

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If << THIS LINK >> can be trusted, he still lives in Battle Ground, WA. Did anyone know him well enough to want to contact him? Who knows, he may be old enough now to have developed a little "TI nostalgia". If you know his email address, one could always 'chum the waters' by sending him a copy of Tursi's Classic 99 and a link to our little corner of Atari Age. If he's interested, a guy with his talent might spice things up here even more.

Oh yeah, I got his email!

 

He was amazed that his old software was still out there and being enjoyed; he hadn't done anything with it in years. I pointed him to this forum and several other TI resources if he wanted to get back into things. I also offered to help with any disk software he may be able to find that needs transferring. I haven't heard much from him since but trust me, he knowas we're here. :)

Edited by adamantyr
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Oh yeah, I got his email!

 

He was amazed that his old software was still out there and being enjoyed; he hadn't done anything with it in years. I pointed him to this forum and several other TI resources if he wanted to get back into things. I also offered to help with any disk software he may be able to find that needs transferring. I haven't heard much from him since but trust me, he knowas we're here. :)

 

Sweet! That is good know! I ran into Quinton a few times at the N.O.V.A. user group I belonged to. I even bought one of his game programs, I think it was called The Living Tomb or something like that. Hopefully he'll find time to come back into the fold within the next few years.

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I had written a very nice (and big) extended basic game, kept copies of it on two separate tapes. Then I had to disassemble the tape recorder because something had broke. When I reassembled it, a latch was not properly put back and the tape recorder >always< recorded when you pressed play....... The horror. In retrospect, I am glad that I only ruined that game and its backup, before I realized what I had done. I could have mangle my entire tape collection.

 

But it made me so depressed that I stopped programming for the ti, moved on to the pc for real. And, yes, 25 years later I take backups very seriously.....

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  • 2 weeks later...

When I think what I had and should have saved. But I never thought that way, back in the day.

I had a few UK cassettes , a couple of them have resurfaced thank's to Ciro Biralles' efforts with the Apex and Intrigue games. I had a couple of others, Dodger, Alpine Quest, all of which I would have somehow gotten a digital image of.

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I backed up all my CoCo disks on new 5 1/4" and 3.5" disks a few years ago and I transferred a lot of it to the PC.
There were a few things that weren't recoverable but I managed to recover just about everything I thought was important.
Fire wiped it all out. The only data that survived was stored on USB drives or backed up on Dropbox.
But almost none of that was related to classic computers.


I suggest getting a small fire safe and back everything up to USB drives and dropbox or a similar service.

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A small fire safe? You are talking to fanatical computer hobbyists, right? I'd have to build a fireproof room. . .which is not a bad idea, actually.

Don't forget the Halon.

 

Yeah, it hurts to lose years of collecting and I lost some nice/rare systems. I'm basically done collecting now and the only new machine I might acquire is an MC-10 since I've written quite a bit of code for that.

 

This conversation prompted me to run another backup of my projects folder to a USB drive.

 

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The hidden shitkicker with backups is that when you conduct them on a consistent schedule you may never ever need them. That can make one become complacent.

 

I've been doing my sister's iTunes and photo library since 2006. And never needed them once. This makes it look like I'm wasting time and all that. Until they are needed.. Which hasn't happened yet. But I still sneak them in at least once a year.

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I think that's why you use some sort of backup utility. Just set the schedule and forget about it.
I used to use a Western Digital USB hard drive that had buttons so you could launch a backup or schedule one or something. It's been a while.
That was the most convenient setup I've owned for nightly backups.

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We had a USB drive that would do scheduled backupa from the main computer at the retail/rental store I managed in Denver. On Monday, the system would not even boot up until you removed the stick and replaced it with another. Each week we would pull the stick and put it in the safe. We had 53 sticks, so we always had a year of back up on our records.

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