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I'm not entirely sure how to word this, especially on forums like this. So please forgive me as I fumble through this. If I offend anyone, please don't take anything personally. I'm not insulting how anyone else spends their time or money... just simply sharing my process over the last few years as I get older and the view of my hobby matures along with me. I keep telling everyone the Coleco thread is dead, so at the very least, here's something to read to get your minds out of the Mike Kennedy gutter. ;) :-D

 

 

 

A while ago, I decided to forgo modern consoles for the PC. I made a post about it somehwere in Classic Gaming subforums. The reasoning: Constant long updates, discs proving no reason other than to download a game to your hdd, paying for online, only one or two generations of consoles playable on one system, low graphic settings and few options for tweaks or mods, a SEVERE lack of exclusives on modern consoles, and games in general being more expensive than their PC counterparts. I just don't see the PS4 or Xbox One for anything more than they really are: locked-down, low-powered PCs.

 

It was a move I was looking forward to, and I can honestly say I've never been happier. Which has shocked me, honestly, as I've always been a console gamer starting with the NES as a kid. A simple HDMI cord (or using a streaming box) and my image is in the living room if need be. I bought a comfy office chair for longer play sessions (got a leather and metal chair that's more comfortable than our couch for 99 bucks at Staples), a new computer to replace my underpowered Thinkpad, and a realy nice Lenovo monitor (thanks to Best Buy for 100 dollars), and it's been perfect. It's been freeing and I've enjoyed every second.

 

 

 

That said, that's not what this is about. This is about consoles in general, now, as I continue further to question the countless boxes cluttering what little space I have throughout my house. And the Retro Freak console opened my eyes to this problem that's been bothering me for some time, in addition to a couple other issues. Resolution, and time.

 

The Retro Freak showed me I was actually happier playing my older console games at a higher resolution with an iBuffalo equivalent controller. I didn't need the real hardware to have fun, nor even a dirty cart to plug in, so long as the pad felt legitimate in my hand. That, and I had grown tired of having low resolution, degrading in quality, and tremendously heavy crtvs littered about my apartment. I have gone through 4 broadcast monitors, and two crt tvs and just got tired of trying to find one with decent quality. But even when I finally found one in mint condition, it would never look as good as a game emulated on a modern screen. Furthermore... and I don't know when this happened... but I've grown to absolutely despise scanlines. It's like they make me ill. Emulation helps rid them from the screen.

 

So with the exception of the odd ball systems I decided to keep that don't translate well on screen (I kept one virtual boy, one neo geo pocket color, ... systems like that), I've fully moved onto having one primary machine for everything. And that of course is my PC. And it's been great. Especially with the wealth of USB controllers out there that mimic the real pads, I'm extremely happy playing everything on the computer. Toss in added bonuses like arcade support, and even recent systems like the GameCube and Dreamcast, and it's quite literally the best way to go for me. Plus, there's an added benefit of not having to worry about old hardware and capacitors. Bad lasers, and bad disc trays. I have a hard drive, easily replicable, and that's it.

 

Collectability means nothing to me. Granted I always keep my things in mint condition, but I'm NOT going to spend 150 bucks on a game I'll play for an hour over the course of 3 months. Just because it's rare. (though ironically some of these rare games are the best selling, most common games on the market...) I think the market is essentially chasing out simple-gamers (not collectors) towards emulation, like myself... and you get the added benefits of higher resolutions, better frame rates, and save states, all on one single box. I like playing games. No, I LOVE playing games. But I don't love hosting a library for thousands of games I'll never play, just to preserve them, or something. The hoarder gene is lost to me, I guess.

 

I've bought these systems and games when they were new. Sometimes more than once, haha. The publishers and developers got my money. If bought over and over, the only person who wins is the guy on ebay who wants hundreds of dollars simply because demand dictates it. I just don't care for hunting down old hardware and software anymore when there's a better way... a way that looks better and honestly, takes up a LOT less clutter. Being in a one bedroom apartment, it's nearly impossible to have any decent collection anyway, and I always had to cycle things to keep myself interested in the hobby. Not anymore.

 

I'm sure this will piss off quite a bit of you. But at the end of the day, I enjoy the games. And that's it. And I don't feel there's anything wrong with that. Has anyone else here started towards this trend, or am I the lone duck. I want to spend time with my wife and my two cats. And I want to game when I have the time, and not have to mess with a lot of failing equipment displaying at 240x240 on a tv the size of my car. I just... I just can't anymore.

 

And in the spirit of irony, one of the only "old" pieces of hardware left along with a collection of software is my older pc, that runs all my old boxed pc games from the 80s and 90s. Funny how that's what survived, simply because those games can't perfectly be emulated on a newer system.

 

I'll forever love those old consoles. Especially for all the memories they gave me with my dad. But it's time to move on from them.

 

Now to finish making my usb arcade joystick...

Edited by MotoRacer
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Guest LiqMat

I think the hunt is exciting for the collector and that has become more painful now that everyone just checks Ebay and then prices their copy at the highest bid that is on Ebay. Even garage sales have become few and far between that are reasonable on their prices.

 

I am with you on all that you said as I have always loved emu gaming on the PC and the only console I use anymore is the Retro Freak. I like clean, simple and most of all just plain fun. I still love finding an old console or computer and bringing it back to its best working and cosmetic condition if it is reasonably priced. My latest project is an Atari 800XL with a Lotharek SIO2SD drive.

 

One of my favorite emu packages out there is the Cloanto Amiga and C64 Forever compilations just because they are well put together and well supported. I even have fallen in love with one of their included Amiga games that I missed in my childhood called Traps 'n' Treasures.

 

I think with any of this it is the joy of discovery and rediscovery and however you keep that alive in your life more power to you.

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The lack of exclusives on today's consoles is something of a concern, but then i look back at the very people who used to make said exclusives:

 

Zipper Interactive, Psygnosis, Bizzare Creations, Lionhead etc etc.

 

Bungie are now multiplatform.

 

I know given the sheer cost involved in producing a game today means it has to be out on as many formats as possible, but.......i do miss the days of buying a second machine, just for it's exclusives.

 

Resolution hasn't been a factor for myself, as i'm not seeing (no pun intended) the leap forward i did when i went from the PS1 to the Dreamcast, then from SD to HD on PS3/360 (and SCART to HDMI).

 

Untill 4K gaming becomes the norm, i expect i won't.

 

:-) I wouldn't worry about 'pissing anyone off', we are all getting older, just game where you feel comfortable, life is far too short to worry about what you feel you ought to be gaming on.

 

If it works? invest the time and money in that platform, is my advice.

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PC gaming for the most part has been getting great exclusives since 2000, sad that the game boxes are no longer being sold for the most part with steam and other download sites.

For the most part Nintendo is really the only console makers getting exclusives that the PC can't play lately also

 

Still remember hits like Torment and Baldur Gate II,Deus Ex, Diablo II, MechWarrior 4, Icewind Dale, Red Alert 2, Icewind Dale,American McGee's Alice,Homeworld: Cataclysm coming out with in a 12 month timeframe

 

Personally i love emulation of my past systems especially since some like the CV are pretty hard to setup on modern TV's, and most systems up to SNES are very close in their emulation.

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I've been able to get Hyperspin going, and I have to say.... wow, if publishers/devs were able to pool together and work hand in hand to make something similar to host their games on (charge per game or maybe a monthly fee) I could see tons of people getting into it.

 

I really appreciate the support. I wasn't expecting it :). This is why I like this site, it's a more mature community, and you guys aren't so hung up in the drama of console vs console that you let it get in the way of the joy of gaming and those other fellow gamers.

 

Like I alluded to in my first post, my setup isn't quite done. That and we'll be moving to a new place (across the street, haha) in a few months, and I'm preparing for that. But I'll try to post some pictures in a few days, hopefully when the joystick is done and I can show that off.

 

I do agree btw, regardless of my feelings on the Wii U (and it's host of issues...), that Nintendo, to their credit, is making the only hardware really worth owning in regards to having a library that isn't nearly 100% accessible on the PC. Hopefully the NX will continue this trend while infusing some much needed 3rd party support into Nintendo's veins along the way.

 

 

So I have to ask, to what extent are you guys using emulation? I know Liqmat shared this, but how much is everyone else relying on emulation these days? And what specs are you rocking in your PC to accomplish the task? Has anyone been brave enough to venture into Naomi, GC, and DC emulation?

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Guest LiqMat

The lack of exclusives on today's consoles is something of a concern, but then i look back at the very people who used to make said exclusives:

 

Zipper Interactive, Psygnosis, Bizzare Creations, Lionhead etc etc.

 

Bungie are now multiplatform.

 

I know given the sheer cost involved in producing a game today means it has to be out on as many formats as possible, but.......i do miss the days of buying a second machine, just for it's exclusives.

 

Resolution hasn't been a factor for myself, as i'm not seeing (no pun intended) the leap forward i did when i went from the PS1 to the Dreamcast, then from SD to HD on PS3/360 (and SCART to HDMI).

 

Untill 4K gaming becomes the norm, i expect i won't.

 

:-) I wouldn't worry about 'pissing anyone off', we are all getting older, just game where you feel comfortable, life is far too short to worry about what you feel you ought to be gaming on.

 

If it works? invest the time and money in that platform, is my advice.

 

I always loved Psygnosis releases. They were always original and imaginative.

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I always loved Psygnosis releases. They were always original and imaginative.

 

Likewise. One of my top five devs of all time. In fact, it was Sony killing them off that made me sell my PS4 back when. One of the main reasons I ever bought Sony hardware was for Wipeout (well, since they've been only regulated to making Wipeout games for whatever reason...). It wasn't Psygnosis' fault the freakin Vita was a poorly marketed system. But Sony took it out on them for not carrying the system with their last game.

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Guest LiqMat

 

Likewise. One of my top five devs of all time. In fact, it was Sony killing them off that made me sell my PS4 back when. One of the main reasons I ever bought Sony hardware was for Wipeout (well, since they've been only regulated to making Wipeout games for whatever reason...). It wasn't Psygnosis' fault the freakin Vita was a poorly marketed system. But Sony took it out on them for not carrying the system with their last game.

 

I loved their Amiga and Atari ST releases back in the 80s.

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I think emulation is the only way to truly appreciate arcade games, unless you have an infinite garage. My porta Pi Raspberry Pi bartop arcade is my baby. So glad I invested in that piece of kit. Thing is it's got to feel like an arcade cab. I've no love for sitting at the desktop with a USB controller. The desktop computer is for work and fractal rendering...

 

I do have too many consoles and piles of carts as it is, though there's something about playing on original hardware. If I ever need to prune down my collection, I'll get rid of some of the glut of carts I've accumulated and focus on homebrew. For commercial releases, having a fully loaded Everdrive for each console will cover the bases.

 

And yes, I keep an 1080p PC monitor positioned above my CRT. Game Cube and back plugs into the CRT. HD consoles plug into the monitor, with audio bypassed to some nice stereo speakers. I got an HDMI switch box and a composite switch box. what else do you need?

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Emulation for the win. Emulation is elegant & sophisticated, timeless & magnificent. It is practical and convenient while being consistent and reliable.

 

But beware! Emulation will also bite you in the ass with a lot of wasted time and frustration if you don't fully understand how to work with and configure the beast. Thankfully it gets easier with experience.

 

 

TLDNR

 

 

Less is indeed more. Emulation for the win. I got into emulation just as it was getting going, this means struggling with the first emulators on my old 486 DX2-50 back in the early 1990's. The days when MAME would emulate 10 games and everything had to be called from the command line. I chose this mode of gaming partly out of necessity and partly out of recognizing the potential it would eventually live up to.

 

Fast forward to now. I have my original Apple II paraphernalia, the wife has her TRS-80 Model II. And it's all sentimental to us. It sees occasional usage.

 

My stash:

1 486 DX2/50 + 3x tubs of support gear
TRS-80 Pocket Computer model 1,2, and 4 Complete MIB NIB CIB (2x tubs)
TI-59 Complete MIB NIB CIB (2x tubs)

90% of all my original Apple II paraphernalia

 

Wife:

TRS-80 Model II

 

In my space cruiser chillout lounge:

1 emulation and space & flight simulation computer

Other AV gear and displays

 

Of course we have other misc modern computer stuff, but that's not the topic here.

 

I typically emulate everything from the 1970's through the 1990's. Altair and CP/M machines up through and including around the N64-PS1-3DO-DC machines. After that emulation gets a little flaky and the material seems less enjoyable anyways. Eventually it'll get up to speed.

 

Time, space, neatness, convenience, reliability, and versatility.. All huge pluses for emulators. I no longer have to mess around with recalcitrant and delicate hardware. I don't have to keep track of thousands of disks and carts, cables and controllers, and those bothersome power bricks. Not to mention RF connections you always have to fiddle with. No more! No more hooking and unhooking systems. No more digging through boxes or scanning shelves for that one specific game I want to play right now. I don't even have to search through piles of manuals either; because when one builds a digital collection one tends to accumulate magazines and manuals and other digitally stored reference material. It's all right here!

 

Just this past month I revamped and updated and built new configurations for several virtual Amiga rigs via emulation and finally got some enjoyment out of that system. I played Jupiter Lander on a virtual Vic-20 for the first time in 35 years, loads of fun!

 

Next week I'm sure I'll be re-discovering something with the TRS-80 CoCo or TI-99/4. Or maybe tomorrow I might play arcade Liberator. That ability to segue between systems instantly is a huge advantage. And there's no worry about anything breaking down or accumulating wear and tear. Managing, curating, or hunting & buying & selling hardware is a thing of the past.

 

I think the people that emulation pisses off are the purists, collectors and the old guard. Emulation at its core is really quite different from the original equipment. And sometimes people are afraid of what they don't understand. Or they tend to pooh-pooh it into insignificance.

 

It scares collectors because their shelves of carts and consoles suddenly become cumbersome when it comes time to actually play the games.

 

Emulation sets up a cognitive dissonance of the 1st degree and one has to overcome it and understand it in order to accept it. On one hand you're seeing a near perfect replica of game-x, while on the other hand this game-x is being synthesized in a completely alien way.

 

I repeatedly hear over and over and over again that it isn't the real thing. Yes. But it's better than the real thing. The tide is changing as convenience and reliability take center stage. Emulation is gaining popularity and is here to stay.

 

Regarding image quality and displays.

I'm in strong favor of LCD because of consistency and color saturation. Once you got your emulator set up it doesn't need to change. The image is rock steady and consistent day to day, year to year. No degrading quality. And most emulators now support CRT effects so you can get a soft fuzzy vintage look if you so desire. Or razor sharp. Or someplace in between. Whatever you want.

 

I also do not like intense scanlines, it looks stupid. I prefer a subtle effect where they're barely visible. Especially when virtualizing the older consoles like the VCS or Intellivision or Astrocade, even the Colecovision. Typically a default setting might be 50% - 100% scanlines for any given emulator. I turn it down to 5% or 10%. Just barely there if you look and pay attention.

 

Switching between consoles and computers no longer means adjusting and tweaking dials on bulky monitors. You set your LCD for normal tv or game viewing, whatever is default or standard works pretty good. You do that only once. Then you make all the adjustments in the emulator when you set it up. You also do one it time only, too. The only display setting I repeatedly toggle is windowed or full-screen depending what I'm working on.

 

As a result, Star Raiders and BallBlazer and 5,000 other games look great and will look just as good 10 years from now. Maybe even better as emulation and display technology evolve. But never worse. Never degrading.

 

Apple //e 80 column mode is looking great on the same monitor that will, in 5 seconds, be displaying the VIC-20's unusual 22-character by 23-lines default text mode. Without any adjustments! Funky overscan mode on an Atari 400/800 game? No problemo..

 

 

 

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Do you think you'll ever go back? In other words, is this a one way street, or just a phase you're going through?

 

I like laying hands on old style controllers, especially in arcade machines, but they're so difficult to find in my area. When I do find them, they're usually poorly maintained, with screen burn-in and/or sticky controls. That reminds me of how old these electronics are, and what a pain it is to store and keep them in good shape. In the meantime, modern stuff gets less expensive and more powerful, widening the gap between the old and new even farther. Pretty much every console and arcade game I ever liked (and even some I haven't discovered yet) can run well enough for me on a $100 tablet.

 

So there's no going back for me. For me, new is better than old, especially when the new includes the cumulative sum of all the old.

 

Side note: when I saw your subject line "less is more," I thought you might mean fewer games to focus on, which is a whole other discussion. We didn't have hundreds of cartridges way back when, for example. I always like the launch of a new console because there are generally some new, unique things coming out for it, and the library is small enough you know exactly what's on it. I guess that's diminishing these days, especially with PlayStation and Xbox largely extending the existing libraries and genres in their "low power locked down PC" state of being!

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I can chime in my experience with a bit of a reverse path. Since the beginning in the 90s I was a big emulation fan (and still am) and I've greatly enjoyed the advances that gradually happened. I avoided original hardware except handhelds and transferred all my media to hard drives (including PC floppies) both to save space but also convenience. I kept my Apple II and my original consoles but would use a PC instead of them.

 

This trend changed 2-3 years ago when I started to get more original hardware. In part I got the bug due to lucky finds and inherited machines, and also getting a taste of hardware with FPGAs (curiosity to compare). I went into both 1) get good video out of them and 2) neatly have everything as much ready for use as possible without using too much space.

 

The video part is kind of silly because at best you'll get the same as an emulator, but somehow you get gradually carried on to try stuff to improve. The other is an interesting challenge and I now have about 8 machines connected via switches to an XRGB-Mini upscaling to HDMI. So its very easy to plop in a cart or CD and play.

 

I mostly run hardware for 2D games though. Anything 3D I reserve to my PC where I run much higher resolutions than the originals. Works well enough for PS2.

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I should add that I try to get SD card adapters for all of my machines. I consider tapes or floppies obsolete and just have 2/3 around for decoration. :)

 

Carts are a bit different but I try to only get what I really want to own (and play) avoiding boxed sets. I want to be able to give kids (young or old :) ) a box of carts to choose from and play without worrying about getting a scratch on a mint cart...

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I still love carts and discs as much as ever, but I admit that I've started to dial way back on my ambitions for collecting systems. I used to want to keep every system I owned hooked up at once, but as time goes on, I've become happier with only keeping the best of the best hooked up, and everything else in the attic (still easy to get to, but out of the way otherwise). I've also put a lot of thought into condensing boxes and simplifying the setup, occasionally considering dumping entire systems that I just don't play often.

 

I can definitely see a point in the future when I use an emulation box for a lot of my playing. We're not there yet, but the RetroFreak and IndieGo are very tempting.

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Psygnosis were simply a fantastic publisher/developer:

Wipeout:2097,Pulse, Pure and HD.
Overboard, G-Police 1 and 2. Colony Wars 1-3, Armour-Geddon, Walker, Shadow Master, The Killing Game Show etc.
I believe they were working on a PS4 Wipeout when they were closed?.
How this was let go, yet likes of Knack were deemed worthy of heading up the launch of a flagship console, is beyond me.
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Do you think you'll ever go back? In other words, is this a one way street, or just a phase you're going through?

 

 

I have been asking myself this question. Emulation satisfies 100% of my needs again and I have considered selling off the hardware, but I'm worried that this is a cycle and I don't want to get rid of stuff only to want it again in a few years.

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Guest LiqMat

Glad you found what fits you...and glad there's one less person for me to have to compete with for carts and hueys. :grin:

 

That's funny.

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Guest LiqMat

I can chime in my experience with a bit of a reverse path. Since the beginning in the 90s I was a big emulation fan (and still am) and I've greatly enjoyed the advances that gradually happened. I avoided original hardware except handhelds and transferred all my media to hard drives (including PC floppies) both to save space but also convenience. I kept my Apple II and my original consoles but would use a PC instead of them.

 

This trend changed 2-3 years ago when I started to get more original hardware. In part I got the bug due to lucky finds and inherited machines, and also getting a taste of hardware with FPGAs (curiosity to compare). I went into both 1) get good video out of them and 2) neatly have everything as much ready for use as possible without using too much space.

 

The video part is kind of silly because at best you'll get the same as an emulator, but somehow you get gradually carried on to try stuff to improve. The other is an interesting challenge and I now have about 8 machines connected via switches to an XRGB-Mini upscaling to HDMI. So its very easy to plop in a cart or CD and play.

 

I mostly run hardware for 2D games though. Anything 3D I reserve to my PC where I run much higher resolutions than the originals. Works well enough for PS2.

 

I will admit there is one piece of hardware I don't think I can let go of and that is the almost retro beast called Steel Battalion. I have three sets currently one being NIB. The other two for playing. I just absolutely love that game with that beast controller and there is nothing like it. No amount of emulation can simulate that "diesel and cigarettes for breakfast" experience.

Edited by LiqMat
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I have been asking myself this question. Emulation satisfies 100% of my needs again and I have considered selling off the hardware, but I'm worried that this is a cycle and I don't want to get rid of stuff only to want it again in a few years.

Always and forever a vicious cycle but I don't believe emulation fits the bill for a lot of things, which is why I'm usually always having hardware around. It's hard to replace the real deal. Emulation still has a lot of kinks or quirks that seem to pop up from time to time and then there's just the really rare stuff that doesn't emulate well. I think the key is having a few of your favorite hardware bits and flashing the daylights out of carts to play the unlimited amount of games, but that's just me. I have to have the best of both worlds (old and new) so having a modern PC isn't the issue to run these sort of things at all, but still, original hardware trumps. Just something about having a console hooked up to the TV and playing with the family is hard to replace, even if it is a rare occurrence.

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The best solution for many folks seems to be some original hardware and using emulation to try new things and fill in the blanks. I personally focus on collecting for 1 system/ecosphere and use emulation to pick up the rest.

 

Others like multicarts. This way they only have to collect the consoles and some accessories. The multicart is a good substitute for walls and rubbermaid tubs packed with cartridges. Additionally, you can collect documentation and manuals that way - they'll never tear, yellow, get lost, or degrade. And you can find them instantly!

 

Using modern tech to supplement old-school collecting is really neat if you can decide on the right balance.

Edited by Keatah
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You can buy a raspi with all accessories for some 70 Dollars and a couple Controllers for 30 Dollars each and Play good Videogames for the rest of your life. But then no one will make Money ouf of that. And we know the only Thing that matters is Money. So there you go. Emulators are bad. You Need to buy the "real deal" or be a pariah. Emulation is like the grow your own crops kinda stuff. No one is interested in promoting that.

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That was my first foray into this, the multicart. But all that did was make me question why on earth I needed the real hardware. Again, with USB controllers that feel like the original, and emulation producing better picture and sound than original hardware ever could, I started not seeing the point.

As far as going back or not, I won't be going back. This has been a process I've been going through for years now. Multicarts, systems like retrofreak, HDMI and component mod's...it's all led to this.

And when hyperspin came around, a really nice graphical gui for everything...all in one, that was when I decided I had had enough.

As far as problems with emulation, unless you're doing something like sega model 3 hardware, you're not going to really encounter a lot of issues, especially in pre n64 hardware. All 8, 16, and 32 bit is pretty perfect. Honestly, if your PC wasn't up to snuff, I guess I could see some people having issues with 64 and 128 bit hardware, but I see no point in ever owning arcade hardware, nes, snes, Genesis, 32x, Sega cd, Neo geo...anything, any portable, ps1, etc ever again. I have USB controllers for all of it, including arcade joysticks, emulation is perfect, and it looks cleaner. It's also all in one spot.

For me, n64, Naomi, dreamcast, and Sega model 2 emulation finally got to a point where today's best hardware does a great job with it. I think that was definitely a tipping point for me. Because for the longest time, Sega Model 2 (which I love dearly) played like absolutely rubbish on the PC.

It's like the indiego box solution that's been shared in this site, but the PC is actually powerful enough to do the emulation right.

No need for multiple emulators. No mess. Hyperspin is loaded, I mess with control options per system, and I'm done. It knows where my roms are, and I'm set. It's quite elegant and I could totally see people making badass arcade cabinets with this stuff. A 5tb hdd was enough for me to fit everything Naomi/dc and back, full rom sets. Includes GC.

It's a pain, but so is collecting for years and years. Once this is set up, you're done. You can just play.

Again, not for everyone. And my collection that I sold off paid for my computer, monitor, chair, with a couple grand to spare. I thought I'd miss it, honestly. There IS a nostalgia factor to the old hardware. But I haven't. Maybe I got tired of the clutter. Maybe it was the resolution. Or maybe it was keeping it all hooked up and dust free.

Either way, I'm out of the rat race and just want to have fun. I hope my collection made someone happy. Actually, I know it did. Haha. Hopefully, for the rest of you guys, prices start to plateau. It's getting nuts out there to just collect what you owned as a kid. The thousands I earned was honestly only from a handful of systems, some rare and a few dozen games. Nothing like what a lot of you guys have. Not in the slightest!

To my credit I really tried not going the emulation route. All my friends would tell me it wasn't the same. I found every way possible to try to at least use old hardware. But this just seems like the best way for me. Especially with PC engine and Sega hardware showing their age. Sigh, no more damned capacitors and crappy backlit screens to fix. I mean, I guess the way I saw it, is a Nomad really a Nomad anymore, when you have a new LCD screen installed, new caps, and a SD card reader cart shoved in the back? It's so modded to cope with its inadequacy, just go the extra inch and just use the computer. A computer that... ironically enough, is probably only worth double the cost you paid for that fancy modded Nomad... which you still can't get decent battery life for, haha. There's nothing like trying to fix a broken 3DO... half way through a HDD mod to replace the bad laser, and asking yourself what in god's name you're doing with your time and money :P.

Edited by MotoRacer
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