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Amiga boucing ball demo


hloberg
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I have seen a version of the Amiga bouncing ball demo done for just about every 8-bit and 16-bit computer (even saw a really pathetic one for the VIC-20). Did anyone ever attempt it for the TI-99? I have never seen one.

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I have seen a version of the Amiga bouncing ball demo done for just about every 8-bit and 16-bit computer (even saw a really pathetic one for the VIC-20). Did anyone ever attempt it for the TI-99? I have never seen one.

 

i don't think i ever saw one for the TI. I did see a TI vs C64 though. I don't remember exactly what it was doing though.

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There was always a bit of "controversy," if you want to call it that, about what was so special about that demo. The short, pretty much everything was done in hardware -- the motion, the shading, etc. -- without software support. RJ Michal and (the late) Dave Needle give good information on how much the hardware mattered during their presentation at Amiga 30 last year.

 

RJ mentions that his biggest regret was the attitude adopted after the Commodore buy-out of Amiga. The original demo had text in the background, something akin to "Amiga Computers," but when Commodore bought them he refused to put "Commodore Business Machines" in, instead. He said that it is easy to set up software algorithms to shade and color a grid, but to do that with text would have been much more impressive and really shown off the hardware.

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  • 8 months later...

At the time of this thread I did the bouncing ball with a width of 3 sprites (red parts) and the shadow (black) being the last sprite. The white part is made up in the background graphics. The Don't Mess Megademo does the ball with 4 sprites and has the shadow in the background graphics. Anyways, since I chose not to commit to the Megademo project, I waited around to see what effects the Megademo included. Here's my unfinished take on the Amiga bouncing ball. As usual it runs on the unexpanded console. I detoured after trying to go from full bitmap mode and only worrying about background patterns every second frame, to an ordinary graphics mode version with updates every frame. Effectively going to make it a 1979 demo instead of 1981 (tms9918 versus tms9918a). Well.

;)

bouncingball.gif

 

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It is nice, as well all other your little demos are... I am sure that if you had been in MegaDemo group you could add other goodies... when someone of the Desire group asked me about good names developers you were in my first three names listed :P

 

two of the others names are into it.

Edited by ti99iuc
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was there any practical use for the demo, or was it just a gimmick?

The Amiga could handle some 3D, so I'm assuming it was exciting at the time as it showcased the advancement over 8 bit

and flight sims took a step up on the ST/Amiga. I was too young being 5 at the time of the Amiga, I just wondered whether it was really impressive, like in the same way everyone gasped at Mario 64, the first time they saw it.

Edited by D.Daniels
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was there any practical use for the demo, or was it just a gimmick?

The Amiga could handle some 3D, so I'm assuming it was exciting at the time as it showcased the advancement over 8 bit

and flight sims took a step up on the ST/Amiga. I was too young being 5 at the time of the Amiga, I just wondered whether it was really impressive, like in the same way everyone gasped at Mario 64, the first time they saw it.

It was a bit of a gimmick really.

The shadow was related to bitplanes, the ball rotation is color cycling, and I think the ball is a "blob".

The sound is pretty cool.

Animating that large of an object like that and with stereo sound... very unusual for the time.

Better yet, you could pull down the window and have something else running without it slowing down.

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It was a bit of a gimmick really.

The shadow was related to bitplanes, the ball rotation is color cycling, and I think the ball is a "blob".

The sound is pretty cool.

Animating that large of an object like that and with stereo sound... very unusual for the time.

Better yet, you could pull down the window and have something else running without it slowing down.

 

thanks for reply, I guess that's still very cool as I didn't think it could run in the background, I thought multi tasking only came with later windows based computers in the 90's

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thanks for reply, I guess that's still very cool as I didn't think it could run in the background, I thought multi tasking only came with later windows based computers in the 90's

Multitasking started on personal computers in '79 with the release of OS-9 and MP/M... though MP/M was switching between tasks for different users with separate terminals.

 

 

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was there any practical use for the demo, or was it just a gimmick?

The Amiga could handle some 3D, so I'm assuming it was exciting at the time as it showcased the advancement over 8 bit

and flight sims took a step up on the ST/Amiga. I was too young being 5 at the time of the Amiga, I just wondered whether it was really impressive, like in the same way everyone gasped at Mario 64, the first time they saw it.

 

At the time, it was eye-catching and supposed to show off the Amiga's capabilities because we hadn't really seen anything like it on home computers before

 

But then in response Atari started showing off bouncing balls and, bouncing 3D spinning Fuji- symbols on ST and even the 8-bit, it kinda "deflated" the ball demo as being an impressive showcase for the hardware.

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At the time, it was eye-catching and supposed to show off the Amiga's capabilities because we hadn't really seen anything like it on home computers before

 

But then in response Atari started showing off bouncing balls and, bouncing 3D spinning Fuji- symbols on ST and even the 8-bit, it kinda "deflated" the ball demo as being an impressive showcase for the hardware.

 

Also, look up R.J. Michal's talk at Amiga 30. He details why this demo was so impressive at the time.

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Multitasking started on personal computers in '79 with the release of OS-9 and MP/M... though MP/M was switching between tasks for different users with separate terminals.

 

 

 

The amiga was the first computer with preemptive multitasking, in 1986 windows/mac didn't get it till the 90s

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exec_(Amiga)

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