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Raspberry pi Project for Atari?


Larry
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So thats a RPI running linux and then Respeqt .. so no reason why this could not be done with USB as well then.

 

James

 

 

That's what I use my RPi2 for; a bog-standard Raspian Linux install on which I've compiled RespeQt. The system's SD card has every single .ATR and .XEX file I possess stored on it. My SIO2USB device is plugged into it. A project for later in the year will be to connect and mount that RPi2 to a small touchscreen display and install that whole thing into the shell of a dead 1050 or 1010 that I have as a standalone "Atari" peripheral.

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That's what I use my RPi2 for; a bog-standard Raspian Linux install on which I've compiled RespeQt. The system's SD card has every single .ATR and .XEX file I possess stored on it. My SIO2USB device is plugged into it. A project for later in the year will be to connect and mount that RPi2 to a small touchscreen display and install that whole thing into the shell of a dead 1050 or 1010 that I have as a standalone "Atari" peripheral.

 

Very nice.. something I might look into myself. please keep us up with how your doing it.

 

James

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  • 4 weeks later...

Are there any Raspberry pi (or similar) projects that could be useful with an Atari that would make sense for a beginner? Kits would be ideal, I think.

 

-Larry

Hi, Larry!

 

I'm running SIO2BSD on a Raspberry Pi 1B with one of Sloopy's SIO2PC USBs.

 

The project would probably be easy for a linux guru but I'm more of a linux end user (if there is such a beast) so it was a bit of a challenge.

 

Would have been easier if I owned the typical minimums for a Rasberry Pi. All my SD cards are only 2GB, mainly have them for my SDrive (and also a uIEC). I also don't own any USB keyboards.

 

I found a distro that is 1GB in size, runs headless, has SSH enabled and wi-fi easily enabled. I just needed to get SIO2BSD compiled for it. I had to jump through some hoops but I finally got it done.

.

I'm currently wondering if I can use Dropbox to maintain files on it.

 

The distro I'm using is called Pi MusicBox. I got it to add functionality to my aging stereo but realized it might suit the bill for the Pi/Atari project as well.

 

-Steve Sheppard

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I did something similar.... I found some spare iPocket 232 serial<->ethernet interfaces in a drawer at work and set one up connected to my 850. Now my Atari can communicate on the network via Telnet or with some hackery even implement application-layer protocols (FTP, etc) on the Atari and let the iPocket do the TCP/IP heavy lifting. I can log in to my Mac via telnet (need to set up telnetd) and run Lynx, PINE, etc.

 

IMHO, the best use of a Raspberry Pi for an Atari project would be:

 

-cram it in a 600XL case

-wire up the keyboard as a USB keyboard (would take some effort)

-run USB to where the joystick ports were

-get some USB CX40 clones

-run Atari800 SDL emulator for Linux

 

Even the emulated Atari would kick a real Atari's ass, you'd get real HDMI output, configurable RAM and multiple OS slots, etc. And you could even play Quake 3 or run a modern browser when you got bored with Star Raiders.

 

Using a quad-core 32 or 64-bit 1GHz+ ARM RISC CPU w/ a 3D accelerator and HDMI out for a simple disk emulator seems to be a bit of a waste to me. The Raspberry Pi itself *IS* a modern answer to the "Home Computer".

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Using a quad-core 32 or 64-bit 1GHz+ ARM RISC CPU w/ a 3D accelerator and HDMI out for a simple disk emulator seems to be a bit of a waste to me. The Raspberry Pi itself *IS* a modern answer to the "Home Computer".

A very good point but I would argue that regardless of the ultimate capabilities it has a Raspberry Pi is cheap. $35 USD? $50 with a case? From a price point of view it compares favorable to all the SIO2xxx devices that have come along. Plus, the RPi can do other things while it is serving files to the Atari and the RPi can be repurposed any time one wishes.

 

I just have a couple of RPi 1 Bs here, single core version. Looking for ideas on how to use them. Haven't had much luck building SDL yet. I would like to run some emulators.

 

I just learned of the Pine A64, a $15 SBC, 64 bit, 1.2 Ghz ARM based. There's also the CHIP computer, "the world's first $5 computer."

 

-Steve Sheppard

Edited by a8isa1
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I just have a couple of RPi 1 Bs here, single core version. Looking for ideas on how to use them. Haven't had much luck building SDL yet. I would like to run some emulators.

 

Have you looked into RetroPie? I know there are (or were) images available for the RP1 ... It typically includes versions of Atari800, Stella and ProSystem to run A8, 2600 and 7800 games, plus an emulator for Lynx, plus some optimized versions of MAME, NES emulators, etc. I don't know how much oomph the RP1 has to run Genesis, SNES or other 16-bit system emulators, but the RP3 runs them with ease.

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Have you looked into RetroPie? I know there are (or were) images available for the RP1 ... It typically includes versions of Atari800, Stella and ProSystem to run A8, 2600 and 7800 games, plus an emulator for Lynx, plus some optimized versions of MAME, NES emulators, etc. I don't know how much oomph the RP1 has to run Genesis, SNES or other 16-bit system emulators, but the RP3 runs them with ease.

I looked at RetroPie but I don't have big enough SD cards. All of mine are for SDrive and uIEC and thus only 2GB

 

I tried the tips for booting from the SD card with the root file system on a USB stick but no luck yet.

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I looked at RetroPie but I don't have big enough SD cards. All of mine are for SDrive and uIEC and thus only 2GB

 

I tried the tips for booting from the SD card with the root file system on a USB stick but no luck yet.

 

You can get an 8GB SD card for like $6 now. Hell, you can get a 128GB card for around $25. I wouldn't even bother with the USB sticks for anything but sneakernet use.

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I got my last PI3 on ebay...

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Raspberry-Pi-3-Model-B-Starter-Media-Center-Bluetooth-Premium-Kit-BLK-CLR-/231873270988?var=&hash=item35fcb954cc:m:mgqVQLZqe-16l9gZGEHOmVQ

 

Great bundle prices with flexible accessory options. I think this is an interesting project...

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVh67wMe0P0

 

but, so far, I have not gotten things working on a PI3 (in large part because it is summer).

 

@kogden, be careful of big, inexpensive SD cards as there are reports of counterfeit cards. Regardless, here is a link to a list of cards tested with the RPI...

 

http://elinux.org/RPi_SD_cards

 

@a8isa1 I am using this $18.40 64GB microsd for my RetroPIe project...

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B010Q588D4/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o08_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

I am hoping to have a retro game cabinet with pro controls in my game room.

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I am hoping to have a retro game cabinet with pro controls in my game room.

 

That could be fun. The only arcade cabs I'd be real interested in would be the vector games though. Space War!, BattleZone, Tempest, Armor Attack, Cosmic Chasm, Solar Quest, Star Castle, etc. Rigging up a vector display to a modern machine gets expensive and an LCD just isn't the same. Though I'm sure a vector display interface could be built for the RasPi pretty easily with all the extra I/O pins.

 

A Pi3 could probably even do a damn good job emulating an ST or any of the 16-bit consoles as well. The Atari 8-bit should be no problem.

Edited by kogden
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A very good point but I would argue that regardless of the ultimate capabilities it has a Raspberry Pi is cheap. $35 USD? $50 with a case? From a price point of view it compares favorable to all the SIO2xxx devices that have come along. Plus, the RPi can do other things while it is serving files to the Atari and the RPi can be repurposed any time one wishes.

 

I just have a couple of RPi 1 Bs here, single core version. Looking for ideas on how to use them. Haven't had much luck building SDL yet. I would like to run some emulators.

 

I just learned of the Pine A64, a $15 SBC, 64 bit, 1.2 Ghz ARM based. There's also the CHIP computer, "the world's first $5 computer."

 

-Steve Sheppard

 

RespeQt works just fine on a Pine64. No changes to the source code required. Haven't tried SIO2BT yet.

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A very good point but I would argue that regardless of the ultimate capabilities it has a Raspberry Pi is cheap. $35 USD? $50 with a case? From a price point of view it compares favorable to all the SIO2xxx devices that have come along. Plus, the RPi can do other things while it is serving files to the Atari and the RPi can be repurposed any time one wishes.

 

Just received $12 clone: http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Orange-Pi-Lite-Support-ubuntu-linux-and-android-mini-PC-Beyond-and-Compatible-with-Raspberry/32662738571.html?spm=2114.13010608.0.56.UA2RhP

So far so good. Will check RespeQt in a while, but you just can't easily beat this price point.

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RespeQt works just fine on a Pine64. No changes to the source code required. Haven't tried SIO2BT yet.

So, since this post I tried Remix 2.0 and got *nowhere* with it. I also reimaged a micro SD card to take a bare bones install of Android and made more progress. It seems to be much happier communicating to Google's servers over Wi-Fi to set my account, download and update apps, compared to the really low download speeds I was getting with wired Ethernet out if the same router.

 

Anyway, I downloaded SIO2BT, did the bluetooth handshake in the settings app, opened the SIO2BT app and it accepted the connection. As with my SIO2PC tests

I booted a stock XE with a souped up SIO2SD connector that also allows a Serial port connection and SIO traffic to pass through. That second connector is where I successfully placed the SIO to BT module. As with my first test, I had the basic system boot from a disk image with one program on it, while data for that program was delivered from the Pine64, a little distance away.

 

Now I will not say these tests are conclusive, they are, actually, just a start. But the XE was able to read, edit and play back a song from a data file delivered over Bluetooth. The loading times were pretty high, which means I have 8quite a bit of investigating to do to fine tune the complete process.

 

So for those keeping score:

Pine64 with Ubuntu and Serial to USB adapter was a complete success.

Pine64 running Android 5.1.1 and SIO2BT was successful, if laggy.

Remix OS - no definitive answer.

Other OS'es?

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I booted a stock XE with a souped up SIO2SD connector that also allows a Serial port connection and SIO traffic to pass through. That second connector is where I successfully placed the SIO to BT module. As with my first test, I had the basic system boot from a disk image with one program on it, while data for that program was delivered from the Pine64, a little distance away.

 

Now I will not say these tests are conclusive, they are, actually, just a start. But the XE was able to read, edit and play back a song from a data file delivered over Bluetooth. The loading times were pretty high, which means I have 8quite a bit of investigating to do to fine tune the complete process.

 

This can't work reliable with a stock machine.

You need a software loader (which copies the OS ROM to RAM and apply a patch to the OS):

 

Please download:

http://abbuc.de/~montezuma/SIO2BT.zip

The loaders are located in the ATR folder.

 

You may also try a SYSCHECK (used as external OS switch) or MyIDE II with new firmware supporting SIO2BT (BETA#17) .

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  • 2 years later...

Here's a new question for an older thread...

 

Is there anything for our Atari like the "Keyrah" adapter that is used for C64 etc. as shown in this video?

 

 

C64 or no, this is neat, I think. But there are other hardware adaptations that do similar things (and a lot more).

 

-Larry

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Here's a new question for an older thread...

 

Is there anything for our Atari like the "Keyrah" adapter that is used for C64 etc. as shown in this video?

 

 

C64 or no, this is neat, I think. But there are other hardware adaptations that do similar things (and a lot more).

 

-Larry

 

 

I did those 3D printed parts for this conversion, and also made parts for a 130XE conversion. The 130XE conversion parts are free on Thingiverse too.

 

More here: http://atariage.com/forums/topic/277531-rpi-conversions/

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