Jump to content
IGNORED

Restoring a crushed box


lazzeri
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

 

You all know that Brazilian Atari 2600 are not exactly valuable but *boxed* Brazilian games are hard to find even down here. And most of the time the boxes are in a really bad shape.

 

This is part of our gaming history. So... I decided to restore a beat-up "Jawbreaker" box from CCE. Box was crushed. It had no internal structure whatsoever - cart and manual were just floating inside a badly crushed box.

 

Restauro_01.JPG

 

Restauro_02.JPG

 

 

 

First step: Used cardboad to recreate the upper corner. See that there´s a little appendix for the flap - it was almost falling apart

 

Restauro_03.JPG

 

 

With a brush, I´ve applied a decent amount of glue on it. Then I put it in place.

 

Restauro_04.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Step two: Using glue I´ve fixed all the printed parts back to place. Some of them were detaching from the box.

 

Restauro_05.JPG

 

 

 

Step three: I made a crate out of styrofoam, so the cart is kept in place and this box will not be easily crushed again...

 

Restauro_06.JPG

 

 

Voilá! Everything in place!

 

Restauro_07.JPG

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So... What do you guys say? Is this a valid thing, or is this "cheating"?

 

Is this kind of restoration acceptable for the hardcore collectors? Or is this tampering?

 

I´m pretty discomfortable with reproductions that does not clear state they are not original. But what about restoration? Is it OK?

 

I would love to hear some thoughts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Museums do similar restorations sometimes, but if you care about your collection long term, it's important to use archival material and archival glue for repairs -- the same stuff used for conservation of old books and documents. It only costs about $15 to get a bottle of Jade 403 archival glue and some archival paperboard. I'd guess that styrofoam is probably pretty safe for conservation work, but I'm not totally sure.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very nice and that's a great idea with the Styrofoam!

 

Thanks! I got some 20mm thick styrofoam and it fitted just perfectly.

 

I´ll give it a try later on some INTV games that are obscenely crushed but I might need a thinner foam.

 

BTW what on earth people do with INVT boxed games, use them as stuffing for couches? Most of the INVT boxes I see around are crushed beyond hope. :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Museums do similar restorations sometimes, but if you care about your collection long term, it's important to use archival material and archival glue for repairs -- the same stuff used for conservation of old books and documents. It only costs about $15 to get a bottle of Jade 403 archival glue and some archival paperboard. I'd guess that styrofoam is probably pretty safe for conservation work, but I'm not totally sure.

 

Hmmm never heard of conservation glue. I´ll do some research. :)

 

Thank you for the tip!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Museums do similar restorations sometimes, but if you care about your collection long term, it's important to use archival material and archival glue for repairs -- the same stuff used for conservation of old books and documents. It only costs about $15 to get a bottle of Jade 403 archival glue and some archival paperboard. I'd guess that styrofoam is probably pretty safe for conservation work, but I'm not totally sure.

 

Sorry to bother: I found this one for sale in Brazil, it seems to be the same thing.

 

http://www.lineco.com/cart.php?m=product_list&c=1118

 

10 USD in USA, 25 USD in Brazil. This place is a nightmare.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Hmmm never heard of conservation glue. I´ll do some research. :)

 

Thank you for the tip!

 

I don't think it's common knowledge in the videogame collecting community, but as some of these things are approaching 40 years old, it's probably worth considering. I just know about it because I've worked in art conservation. There are actually a lot of different ways to approach it. I've used both archival glue and tape for repairing boxes.

 

Cheap glues will eventually yellow and become brittle, and cheap paperboard is likely to eventually decay and damage adjacent materials. But you have many years before this happens.

Edited by Paul Slocum
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most paper conservators use wheat starch paste on artworks.

You can easily and cheaply make this.

Get wheat starch from the baking aisle of your supermarket (or online from a conservation website)

in a heat proof glass or vessel combine 1 part of wheat starch to 6 parts water (filtered water if you are hardcore :))

I use one teaspoon of wheat starch to 6 teaspoons of water

Microwave for 30 seconds - then stir

microwave for 10 seconds - then stir

another 10 seconds and you're done.

 

leave to cool down for a few minutes.

 

then brush on very sparingly.

 

FYI (and this is probably not really an issue with glueing cartridge boxes together) PVA is water soluble when wet - but irreversable when dry and cured.

EVA on the other hand is water soluble even after drying, and hence a better option for art works where reversibility is required.

Edited by nofrills100
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most paper conservators use wheat starch paste on artworks.

You can easily and cheaply make this.

Get wheat starch from the baking aisle of your supermarket (or online from a conservation website)

in a heat proof glass or vessel combine 1 part of wheat starch to 6 parts water (filtered water if you are hardcore :))

I use one teaspoon of wheat starch to 6 teaspoons of water

Microwave for 30 seconds - then stir

microwave for 10 seconds - then stir

another 10 seconds and you're done.

 

leave to cool down for a few minutes.

 

then brush on very sparingly.

 

FYI (and this is probably not really an issue with glueing cartridge boxes together) PVA is water soluble when wet - but irreversable when dry and cured.

EVA on the other hand is water soluble even after drying, and hence a better option for art works where reversibility is required.

 

Excellent! Thank you for your tips!

 

Yesterday I´ve restored another box (Tax Avoiders, crushed upper lid). Did a similar job including Styrofoam. Box seems rectangular once again. :D

 

It´s been great fun and cheaper than a psychiatrist. ;)

 

I´ll try alternative gluing methods, especially this starch glue. And i´ll import the adhesive cited above.

 

Thank you all!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi all, I've found that to help keep the bottom of the boxes square and from getting crushed, just put a combat cart in the empty space to help keep the shape and it stabilizes the box for display as it is not top heavy anymore. I have tried it on mostly Atari but some other makers have the space in their boxes too. ;-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So... What do you guys say? Is this a valid thing, or is this "cheating"?

 

 

I think you did a great job. Nice thread...nice to hear the other suggestions. I never thought to try to restore a box, but now you have all given me hope that it can be done and can be therapeutic at the same time. :-D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most paper conservators use wheat starch paste on artworks....

 

...FYI (and this is probably not really an issue with glueing cartridge boxes together) PVA is water soluble when wet - but irreversable when dry and cured.

EVA on the other hand is water soluble even after drying, and hence a better option for art works where reversibility is required.

 

Great tips, the paper conservator who told me about archival PVAs also showed me how to make wheat paste, but non-reversible PVA is okay for most of the repairs I make (boxes, labels, etc.) I also sometimes have used gummed archival tape that is reversible with water.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I think you did a great job. Nice thread...nice to hear the other suggestions. I never thought to try to restore a box, but now you have all given me hope that it can be done and can be therapeutic at the same time. :-D

 

Thank you! :)

 

Here´s the Tax Avoiders box. The shape is just perfect now!

 

IMG_3689.JPG

 

And here´s the patch: A big chunk of cardboard on the back panel, extending to the side face and also to the top lid and flap. It seems pretty strong now. I guess I´m happy with that. :)

 

IMG_3690.JPG

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...