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THE 64 Computer


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For those of you who do not know, THE 64 computer is an upcoming computer that is a remake of the Commodore 64. THE 64 has a different cartridge slot, but an adapter is in the works to play original games. THE 64 will come preloaded with hundreds of classic games, but the new cartridge slot is made for NEW games. Here is the website link: http://the64.computer/.

 

For those of you who would like to make games for it (THE 64 team said that any "homebrew" for it is an actual release), I got a response back from THE 64 team:

 

Yes it will have both old and new games installed and also be open to games for the C64 to be added also!

Thanks for your interest!


> On 11 Oct 2016, at 01:46, Thomas <info@retrogames.biz> wrote:
>
> From: Thomas
> Subject: Games
>
> Message Body:
> Will THE 64 be treated as an actual game console, or a flashback? Meaning, will there be third party developers, and will the game console have a variety of new games?

 

If you would like to talk to THE 64 team about the new cartridge format, you can email at retrogameslimited@gmail.com .

Edited by GemWare Games
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Yes, but you cannot play the new games coming in specific format for THE 64. Also, emulating games is 100% illegal, no matter what anyone says. Also, me being me, I'd rather own the physical thing.

There are several systems supporting "new games". Exactly which system should I go with that isn't the original machine?

Oh right... everyone says their machine. Or I could just get new games for Android or the PC if we aren't going with the original hardware.

BTW, I notice you didn't say the real thing.

 

Also, I didn't KNOW that you KNOW, so don't get snappy. And it's not my fault that they don't have a domain. By the way, I looked up THE 64 in forums, and nothing pulled up.

 

 

Have a Snickers already

Edited by JamesD
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Also, I didn't KNOW that you KNOW, so don't get snappy. And it's not my fault that they don't have a domain. By the way, I looked up THE 64 in forums, and nothing pulled up.

 

Woah, there, Machete; there was no effort to kill the messenger, just pointing out that 1) there was a thread here (and yes, I know the search is not always great) in which many, many opinions had been expressed, and 2) the snide comment, again not directed toward you, was that one would think a genuine and valid business operation would secure its own domain for the appearance of legitimacy.

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Also, emulating games is 100% illegal

How so?

First, no one emulate games, it's the machine that get emulated.

Second, it depends on what your machine contain.

Machine made of off the shelves parts that are over 20 years old aren't covered anymore by patents. But design, name, brand are still protected.

A "The 64" branded machine might be subject to copyright infrigment, as the goal is clearly to connect to the Commodore 64.

 

If you mean that playing game ROM is 100% illegal then no.

Some games are free to download, available on the editor site for free (it's the case for the first GTA game on PC, for The Elder Scrolls Arena and Daggerfall), some editors have even dropped their games into the public domain (the Vectrex games). Some editors doesn't maintain their games on a site but have stated that people were free to download them from anywhere they would find them (Amsoft).

And of course most homebrew games are usually free to download and play.

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I must admit that the more I look at the official website, the less I understand what this product will do, or how it will differ from any Raspberry Pi built into a C64 shell with the suitable emulator installed.

 

The technical details are so scarce, scattered and ambiguous that one could claim they don't exist, or at least are not published yet. What about a custom cartridge port, isn't it far more logical to load additional software from industry standard memory cards? What about the spec, will it entirely emulate a C64 and nothing beyond that? For comparison, the C64DTV joystick had extended colour modes that made it a new development platform beyond just being able to run C64 software.

 

The choice of slogan "The 64 is dead, long live THE 64" is disrespectful to the entire C64 community, which thrives more than enough both in terms of new hardware (even a redesigned motherboard from Individual Computers!) and software en masse, mostly freeware but some commercial releases too. Actually Jens recently acquired some kind of rights to market his items with the Commodore brand, which is unique considering the previous brand name holders' appearance. Also regarding the portable device nicknamed "SX64", better check so that is not a trademarked designation as it very heavily alludes to the luggable Commodore SX-64. They could call the handheld device "THE 64P" or something to get around that.

 

No, I think this project alienates most of the remaining community. Of course a huge number of nostalgic people who are nowhere near the core community will be interested to buy, but it appears the most loyal fans will figure it is not for them.

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Strange to me that a relatively new member would create a topic about this thing, then defend it with a gusto. You on the team or have you just picked a weird hill to make a stand on?

 

Either way, I have no patience or interest in any more of these crowd-funded projects. Come to me with an actual product and I might plunk down some cash for it. I'm getting really tired of being asked for money when all a company has are some bloody 3D renders and a video of some board with tape on it running a few seconds of a game. I remember the days when, out of sheer novelty, we handed our money over and in return received an actual product.

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Yes, but you cannot play the new games coming in specific format for THE 64. Also, emulating games is 100% illegal, no matter what anyone says. Also, me being me, I'd rather own the physical thing.

 

The physical thing. The real thing. ..Can only be had from the likes of ebay or craigslist. Nobody is making new C64s today that I'm aware of.

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Either way, I have no patience or interest in any more of these crowd-funded projects. Come to me with an actual product and I might plunk down some cash for it. I'm getting really tired of being asked for money when all a company has are some bloody 3D renders and a video of some board with tape on it running a few seconds of a game. I remember the days when, out of sheer novelty, we handed our money over and in return received an actual product.

 

That's funny. Already this thread has Coleco Chameleon overtones and it isn't even a page long.

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A "The 64" branded machine might be subject to copyright infringement, as the goal is clearly to connect to the Commodore 64.

 

Actually, the intellectual property issue here would be a trademark infringement. In the United States, the trademark would probably be considered abandoned as it has not been used in commerce in more than 10 years.

 

Copyright certainly would still apply to thinks like the C-64 ROM; though who currently owns that copyright is an interesting question.

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Supposedly the intellectual properties to Commodore's own software has travelled with the trademark all along the way. Cloanto is licensed to sell products using the Commodore ROMs, which is the way this product will approach the issue, it seems. Now exactly how much software that involves is another question. Besides the built-in ROMs, Commodore did publish a few games, educational and productivity software on cartridge, disk and tape, but I'm not sure how much of that was software licensed to Commodore and what were their own properties. Generally it doesn't matter to most nostalgic users of today, since the vast amount of the most desired games and other software came from 3rd party publishers.

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Actually, the intellectual property issue here would be a trademark infringement. In the United States, the trademark would probably be considered abandoned as it has not been used in commerce in more than 10 years.

 

Copyright certainly would still apply to thinks like the C-64 ROM; though who currently owns that copyright is an interesting question.

The Commodore brand belongs to Tulip, which might be owned by somone else.

Commodore branded products have been released lately, some computers, MP3 players. The C64 DTV was also an official Commodore product.Tho all of those mgiht be mroe than 10 years old. Still there would be a serious argument that an item named "The 64 computer" explicitely aim al using the C64 popularity.

How exactly Tulip/Commodore could prove that it would be harmful to them is another question.

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Yes, but you cannot play the new games coming in specific format for THE 64. Also, emulating games is 100% illegal, no matter what anyone says. Also, me being me, I'd rather own the physical thing.

Maybe, but then again emulating 30 years old games that nobody cares about makes you incredibly cool, so it's well worth the risk ;)

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...

This thing flopped, didn't it?

 

They just posted an update with a lot of words, and a very meagre "phone footage" showing a bootup sequence, which smells very suspicious in an era of cheap video capture cards. Making an emulator console shouldn't be an alien autopsy... Edited by Newsdee
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And a lot of name dropping:

 

"Interestingly, it was recently revealed that Nintendo have used the same family of chip in the all new Xmas 2016 hit, the Nintendo NES Classic Mini retro gaming console."

 

..their bold emphasis, not mine! And FYI the NES-mini was a fail because of availability.

 

Anyways, on the positive side of things. It's fantastic to see emulation bringing the classics to the masses. Emulation is really the only cost-effective practical way to do it. Recreating real hardware in real custom chips is way too expensive, both in design and manufacturing. Recreation in FPGA is also too expensive, because of the needed hardware. And with FPGA you don't get the versatility of software-driven emulation.

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