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Running NTSC gear in PAL country


ralphb
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I'd like to use my US TI 99 and other NTSC gear here in Germany, where PAL is standard.

 

My big CRT TV can run both PAL and NTSC, but my small Commodore CRT monitor cannot. So I'm looking for the best way to run NTSC on a CRT monitor with a composite signal. (The F18A is great, but I'm looking for something else here.)

 

1. NTSC-compatible PAL CRT monitor with composite

 

If there are any, I haven't found them.

 

2. composite NTSC-PAL converter

 

This was my second thought, but the only converter available simply doesn't work. (Tested with two models on TI 99 and Pyuuta.)

 

post-35214-0-43190700-1498046162.jpg

 

Do you know any working converters?

 

3. NTSC-VGA converter

 

VGA CRT monitors are readily available. Does somebody have experience with converting to VGA? How is the resulting picture on a CRT?

 

Finally, what are you using to view foreign sources?

 

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Maybe not quite what you want, but there's a PDF on whtech that is titled "TI994A NTSC to PAL Conversion":

 

ftp://whtech.com/datasheets%20and%20manuals/Datasheets%20-%20TI/TI%20NTSC%20to%20PAL%20Conversion.pdf

 

Unfortunately the site is inaccessible at the moment. I pulled some of the content of the document from Google's cache:

 

 

2 x 560 RESISTORS one-half watt.
1 x TMS9929 V.D.P.
1 x 6 PIN DIN SOCKET (CHASSIS MOUNT)
1 x PAL MODULATOR PHP2036
REMOVE 5 PIN DIN SOCKET J201 AND U100 TMS9918 VDP PROCESSOR
CHIP. REPLACE 6 PIN DIN PLUG AND TMS9929 VDP CHIP.
SOLDER 560 RESISTORS R210—R211 IN VACANT HOLES ABOVE AND
BELOW L101 (TOP LEFT CORNER)
UNSOLDER EARTH ENDS OF W201, 202, 203 204 JUMPERS US AND
RESOLDER TO VACANT ACTIVE HOLES LOCATED NEAR.
PLUG IN PAL MODULATOR TO COMPLETE CONVERSION.

 

Edit: Using Omega's document, I updated the quote above to fix scan errors by google.

Edited by chue
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Good point, but I only expect that the signal becomes somewhat jerky. I guess VGA is better, as it can keep the 60 Hz -- resizing, and thus reducing image quality, need to do both.

 

I was actually thinking of transplanting an NTSC unit to a PAL monitor, preferably from the same model, or alternatively transplanting a 220V power unit to an NTSC monitor. I have yet to talk to my analog electronics guru what he thinks about this.

 

I know some people use US consoles in Europe -- are you all using F18As?

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Oh i understand... i have a 22" samsung TV on my desk that i use only as a monitor. so i have an HDMI,VGA,DVI,SCART,COMPONENT,AudioIN,Composite... all in one Monitor :P i just have to change the origin with the remote

Edited by ti99iuc
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Very well, but the other requirement is that the monitor supports composite. :) That's for the Pyuuta and the Geneve. But I also prefer the "dirty but not too dirty" look for leisurely using the TI 99 as well. The F18A is only for development.

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Very well, but the other requirement is that the monitor supports composite. :) That's for the Pyuuta and the Geneve. But I also prefer the "dirty but not too dirty" look for leisurely using the TI 99 as well. The F18A is only for development.

 

Ah, for some reason I was thinking that you were married to your Commodore CRT on this. Well if you don't have a problem with a somewhat modern HDMI monitor, the following is exactly my setup today. I have an NTSC TI outputting composite, going into a converter (composite to HDMI). The converter was around US $15.

 

The picture isn't that bad actually. It is a little "dirty" as you say. The background is quite clear. Edges are not crisp. Lettering looks a little fuzzy, but not unreadable.

 

Example photos attached. They are original size photos, so quite large. I tried to resize them but the resizing caused artifacts.

post-47499-0-03189600-1498170574_thumb.jpg

post-47499-0-27723300-1498170595_thumb.jpg

Edited by chue
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I was afraid of that. OK, I will leave you alone :)

 

Haha, no, thanks for your creativity! I'm sorry if I'm just too weird and insist on a retro look for my picture. ;) I'll test the VGA converter, and if that doesn't work, I'll look for an NTSC monitor (but importing from US will be precarious). :thumbsup:

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  • 2 weeks later...

Look in the charity shops for a PAL tv with CRT and with an analog composite input (SCART cables can support analog composite too) and give it a go- usually found for under twenty quid. Ignore anything with a digital tuner built in though- they deliberately broke support for analog. Try "British Heart Foundation" larger shops. Later crt tv sets became fairly friendly to NTSC signals. My current crt tv set is nominally PAL, my TI is PAL- but I can watch NTSC videotapes and DVDs without any problem. Sets varied depending on the chipset used. Worth mentioning that the UK TI console external modulator was not UK PAL, it was European pal, which differed just enough to cause tuning problems (the sound channel was a little farther from the video channel). I can even watch the ancient SECAM tv signals on my "PAL" tv set- but without the colour!

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Thanks for the tipp! I already have a 28" CRT television that does NTSC and SECAM, but I'm looking for a computer monitor I can put on my desk (and sit quite closely in front of). ;)

 

My guru said that some (later) converters in monitors were prepared for both NTSC and PAL with one possible IC, but a PAL IC was put in. If so, I need to check some schematics to find a good monitor that I can commutate.

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It can be a little hit and miss with 14" CRT TVs and monitors accepting NTSC composite video. In our computer club we have two Sony monitors that happily accept NTSC composite as well as RGB with great sharpness, but those are not very common. If you can obtain an inexpensive small LCD TV, those tend to be more forgiving (newer) when it comes to NTSC signals.

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Those are coax connectors. Actually the Sony monitors I referred to have a single coax for composite video, but there are inexpensive adapters to connect RCA style cables too. The inputs on the image look like component inputs, which may or may not work with the TI-99 natively without going through composite but that would be the advanced course.

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