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I dropped out at $5000


towmater
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Dropping out at 5K? No big loss, it's missing parts on the motherboard anyways.. If some flunky wantsa buy it then it's their loss.

 

When deciding to bid on things like this I ask myself two simple questions. What will be the benefit to me directly? How will this improve my classic gaming and computing experiences?

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Ohh how cool. Another project..

 

I bet it'll be more versatile and reliable and have modern connectivity options for convenience and ease-of-use. I'd much rather have the remake than the original, even if there's a 1% loss in compatibility somehow.

I'd rather have a finished product than a prototype any day.

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I'll second that.

 

Protos are kinda "rare" and "cool" and "full of history" though they always lack some important feature. This even applies to first-runs of a new product line. And with computers, software is usually written for the machine that has most market penetration. And protos don't fall into that category.

 

I swear, theoretically, I could talk to 500 people and tell them I have a C65DX and none of them are going to know what it is. They're gonna frown when I say it's 40 year old computer, and go completely aghast when I tell them I spent $10,000 on something that's completely useless. They'll walk away from me when I tell them it's like a Commodore-64, but has missing parts and doesn't work.

 

They're going to view me as genuinely stupid, because that's money that could have been spent on useful things like furniture or lawn equipment or power tools.. Something that's useful and does something other than sit on a shelf rotting away.

 

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On the other hand.. I could talk to the same 500 people. Tell them that I spent $1000 and assembled my own "custom" computer that can play most every arcade game, computer game, and most every console game ever made. And still have $9,000 left over. They're going to be rather impressed and want to know more about it. I bet they'd even be interested in knowing there are new versions and spin-offs of the old C64.

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No, nobody will be interested that you assembled your own computer other than to say "oh, so you can fix my computer."

 

I get asked that frequently, still, in this day and age of disposable information appliances. I simply tell them that it would not be cost effective. All computers are disposable. And that's the truth.

 

Years ago I used to be the go-to IT guy in the area but I'm glad I got out of that. No time for tracking down obscure viruses and educating incompetent users that should not have a computer in the first place. Take a class at the community college - yup, they offer facebook, snapperchatter, and twittering social media courses. And learn the file system. If I can do it anybody can.

 

Still having trouble? Hire a personal IT assistant $150 per hour. That shuts 'em up pretty quick. And pisses them off, too. They stop asking me. I couldn't be happier.

 

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Sometimes they counter back, desperately, saying it's only a few clicks.. how long could it take? I tell them I don't know. Shit we knew last week is now different for no good reason and they'd have to pay me again to figure it all out.

 

Fuck I don't know. Call customer service. Gets rid of them even faster.

Edited by Keatah
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At least you tried. Most of us wouldn't have $5K to spend on a single vintage computer in the first place.

 

A friend of mine came across a Commodore 65 in the mid 90's when the stock was liquidated. A few years later he sold it with a small profit. Numerous times he has mentioned that in hindsight he should've kept it much longer until the bids started to go high. After all it was a rare prototype from the start so it had been worth taking a chance that it would be very desired in the future.

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For investments, I prefer shares. You don't have to lug crap around wherever you go and as spectacular as all the 'found it in a shed' type things are when sold, most of us aren't going to see that kind of return. And if it's a car, well, how much did you spend keeping it going, storing it etc? Computers and consoles I buy for fun. Sure they have gone up in value, but I probably won't part with any of it soon anyway. By the time I want to, maybe the values have gone down again...

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