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Color Bar Generator for Atari 8-Bit Computers


ballyalley
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Is there any software for the Atari 8-bit home computers that creates color bars and other test patterns? I'm looking for software that can create at least an image that looks like (or is at least similar to) this pattern:

 

post-4925-0-29157100-1511713076.gif

 

Any other test patterns (like various crosshatches) would be a great bonus. There is software on the Atari 2600 that does this already; it's called Color Bar Generator:

 

http://atariage.com/software_page.php?SoftwareLabelID=93

 

I plan to use the software with my Atari 130XE to test the following:

 

1) RF to TV

2) Composite to TV

3) S-video to TV

4) RF to demodulator to composite TV

 

Any help finding software like this for my Atari is appreciated. Thanks!

 

Adam

 

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Is there any software for the Atari 8-bit home computers that creates color bars and other test patterns? I'm looking for software that can create at least an image that looks like (or is at least similar to) this pattern:

 

attachicon.gifsmpte2.gif

 

Any other test patterns (like various crosshatches) would be a great bonus. There is software on the Atari 2600 that does this already; it's called Color Bar Generator:

 

http://atariage.com/software_page.php?SoftwareLabelID=93

 

I plan to use the software with my Atari 130XE to test the following:

 

1) RF to TV

2) Composite to TV

3) S-video to TV

4) RF to demodulator to composite TV

 

Any help finding software like this for my Atari is appreciated. Thanks!

 

Adam

 

Hi there,

 

I found this one. Hope its some use.

 

http://gury.atari8.info/software/1678.php

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Thanks for the help finding some programs. I ended up using Color Bars from the Bellcom disk collection. I'll probably try the other programs at another time.

 

I was able to get the colors adjusted to my satisfaction. I've been using this Toshiba 14" TV for years now. I never realized just how off that they were until today. I took four screenshots of how the TV looks with the corrected (at least to my eyes) settings. I should have taken some "before" pictures, but I didn't think to do that. There is an amazing amount of difference that you can see between the various connections: composite, s-video, RF and composite (via RF an Ambery RFDM2 to demodulator). These screenshots, taken with my Canon Powershot SX60 HS give an idea of the picture quality difference, but they don't really do the s-video output of the 130XE justice (that just looks beautiful in person!):

 

Here is the Atari 130XE hooked up via composite:

 

post-4925-0-76388000-1511725458_thumb.jpg

 

Even though s-video looks much better, I normally use composite video, as it allows for video artifacting. If I play any games that use artifacting to get more colors, then these games are B&W when using s-video output. Here is my system displaying via s-video:

 

post-4925-0-77349800-1511725605_thumb.jpg

 

Here is the Atari 130XE hooked up via RF:

 

post-4925-0-25678100-1511725696_thumb.jpg

 

Here is the composite output of my Atari hooked up using my Ambery RFDM2. The route the video takes is RF out of the Atari into the demodulator and then composite out of the demodulator into the TV:

 

post-4925-0-79601200-1511725793_thumb.jpg

 

Thanks pointing me to this very useful color bar utility!

 

Adam

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Thanks for the help finding some programs. I ended up using Color Bars from the Bellcom disk collection. I'll probably try the other programs at another time.

 

I was able to get the colors adjusted to my satisfaction. I've been using this Toshiba 14" TV for years now. I never realized just how off that they were until today. I took four screenshots of how the TV looks with the corrected (at least to my eyes) settings. I should have taken some "before" pictures, but I didn't think to do that. There is an amazing amount of difference that you can see between the various connections: composite, s-video, RF and composite (via RF an Ambery RFDM2 to demodulator). These screenshots, taken with my Canon Powershot SX60 HS give an idea of the picture quality difference, but they don't really do the s-video output of the 130XE justice (that just looks beautiful in person!):

 

Here is the Atari 130XE hooked up via composite:

 

attachicon.gifAtari_130XE_NTSC_Color_Bars_Composite_01.jpg

 

Even though s-video looks much better, I normally use composite video, as it allows for video artifacting. If I play any games that use artifacting to get more colors, then these games are B&W when using s-video output. Here is my system displaying via s-video:

 

attachicon.gifAtari_130XE_NTSC_Color_Bars_S-Video_03.jpg

 

Here is the Atari 130XE hooked up via RF:

 

attachicon.gifAtari_130XE_NTSC_Color_Bars_RF_01.jpg

 

Here is the composite output of my Atari hooked up using my Ambery RFDM2. The route the video takes is RF out of the Atari into the demodulator and then composite out of the demodulator into the TV:

 

attachicon.gifAtari_130XE_NTSC_Color_Bars_RF_to_Demodulator_to_Composite_01.jpg

 

Thanks pointing me to this very useful color bar utility!

 

Adam

 

Yes indeed. I think its between composite and s-video. Good test.

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