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So, I want a Sixer, but I need some input on which one.


RamrodHare
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Ok, I have a Vader, a Jr. and a 7800. I use the Jr. 99% of the time and I'm really happy with the performance of it. I find the picture quality to be better on the Jr. than on the Vader. I'm considering selling the Vader and the 7800 and putting the money toward a decent sixer. Don't get me wrong, I really like the 7800, but don't play it very often. I only have 4 games for it and I just can't afford some of the games I'd be interested in having for it. I figure there's someone out there who could give it a better home and actually get some enjoyment out of it. ;-)

 

I've always like the look of the sixers, but when it comes to the difference between the light and the heavy, is it purely cosmetic or are there differences in the the actual electronics? :?

 

Is the Sears version any different/better than the Atari version or is it just a matter of looks? I can tell you I like the look of the wood grain on the Sears more than the Atari, but I'm on the fence about the silver around the switches, so it's 50/50 for me. I wouldn't mind hearing how many people prefer the look of the Sears and how many like the look of the Atari version and why. :?

 

I'm interested in hearing opinions on how people feel about the price difference between the light and the heavy. For someone on a tight budget, is it worth it to try and get a heavy or just be satisfied with the light sixer? :woozy:

 

I know the ones made in Sunnyvale are higher priced, for someone who just wants a nice looking sixer to play, is it worth the difference in price? :-o

 

Some of you know, I'm on a fixed income. So price plays a big factor in everything. The way I figure it, all I can spend is what I make from selling my Vader and 7800 and possibly some other stuff. I don't know if it will be enough to get a decent Heavy sixer or not, but that's my goal. :thumbsup:

 

I guess what I'm looking for is some reassurances that a light sixer is just as good, in case I can't raise enough money for a heavy. However, if you convince me that only a heavy sixer will do, then it might force me to dig up more stuff to sell, so I can get one. :grin:

 

(I've got another stone lodged in my kidney, so if my post is a little "weird", it's because I'm on some serious pain medications right now.) :P

 

 

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Ok, I have a Vader, a Jr. and a 7800. I use the Jr. 99% of the time and I'm really happy with the performance of it. I find the picture quality to be better on the Jr. than on the Vader. I'm considering selling the Vader and the 7800 and putting the money toward a decent sixer. Don't get me wrong, I really like the 7800, but don't play it very often. I only have 4 games for it and I just can't afford some of the games I'd be interested in having for it. I figure there's someone out there who could give it a better home and actually get some enjoyment out of it. ;-)

 

I've always like the look of the sixers, but when it comes to the difference between the light and the heavy, is it purely cosmetic or are there differences in the the actual electronics? :?

 

Is the Sears version any different/better than the Atari version or is it just a matter of looks? I can tell you I like the look of the wood grain on the Sears more than the Atari, but I'm on the fence about the silver around the switches, so it's 50/50 for me. I wouldn't mind hearing how many people prefer the look of the Sears and how many like the look of the Atari version and why. :?

 

I'm interested in hearing opinions on how people feel about the price difference between the light and the heavy. For someone on a tight budget, is it worth it to try and get a heavy or just be satisfied with the light sixer? :woozy:

 

I know the ones made in Sunnyvale are higher priced, for someone who just wants a nice looking sixer to play, is it worth the difference in price? :-o

 

Some of you know, I'm on a fixed income. So price plays a big factor in everything. The way I figure it, all I can spend is what I make from selling my Vader and 7800 and possibly some other stuff. I don't know if it will be enough to get a decent Heavy sixer or not, but that's my goal. :thumbsup:

 

I guess what I'm looking for is some reassurances that a light sixer is just as good, in case I can't raise enough money for a heavy. However, if you convince me that only a heavy sixer will do, then it might force me to dig up more stuff to sell, so I can get one. :grin:

 

(I've got another stone lodged in my kidney, so if my post is a little "weird", it's because I'm on some serious pain medications right now.) :P

 

 

 

Taking your questions in order:

 

1. There are some differences between Light and Heavy Sixers internally, but they are mostly things to improve reliability - a better, more traditional heat sink for the 7800, some changes to a few capacitor types and layout, a generally better/more reliable ribbon cable between the switch board and main board. Some say Heavies have better RF output than Light Sixers, but both my Heavy and my Light Sixer produce incredibly rich video so on the same TV, I don't see any real differences there.

 

2. Sears-branded Telegames machines - from Heavy Sixers to 4-Switch Woodies - are exactly the same as the Atari-branded machines. They were made on the same assembly lines by the same people, using the same internal parts as Atari-branded machines. The only differences are the upper and lower case plastics, and the boxes and printed manuals, etc. Personally, I love my Sears Heavy and think it's just about the best-looking classic 8-bit console ever made. :)

 

3. The pricing differences between Heavy and Light Sixers are probably "worth it" if you consider rarity - there are a good number of Heavy Sixers mader from '77 through '78, but there were a LOT more Light Sixers made from '78 through '80 or so. But the Light Sixer was what I had as a kid, so when I started seeking another VCS several years ago, I bought a Light Sixer. I've since compared video of my Sears Heavy with the Sixer and they're basically equal on the same TV. So unless you just want to throw money at a hobby, or just HAVE to have a Heavy to scratch an itch, I'd say get a Light Sixer. But that's just me.

 

4. A small number of Light Sixers were made in Sunnyvale but most were made in Taiwan, while most Heavies were made in Sunnyvale but evidently a very, very small number were made in Taiwan (my guess is to train factory workers when Atari was about to move most Light Sixer production overseas). And there are even pictures of 4-Switch Woodies made in Sunnyvale - my theory there is they were pilot production machines to test assembly and QC procedures before sending production to Taiwan. So ... if you get a Heavy, it'll almost certainly be a Sunnyvale machine. If you get a Light, it'll probably be a Taiwan machine.

 

Personally, all things considered and in your circumstances, I'd suggest getting a nice, clean Light Sixer and playing the crap out of it. :)

 

Hope this helps.

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DrVenkman,

Thanks for the answers. That cleared up most of the things I was wondering about. Now I have a good enough understanding of the differences to help me make a better decision. It sound like the hardware improvements on the Light Sixer might be enough to push me toward getting it instead of a heavy.

 

As far as looks go, I'm not sure I would really notice enough difference in the shell of a Light and a Heavy. I'm still on the fence between the Sears and the Atari. That Sears woodgrain is just SO much better looking. I just don't know how I feel about the silver around the switches though.. In a perfect world, I'd throw together a Sears Heavy, with an Atari switchplate and light sixer guts. I think I need to just look at more pictures of the consoles and try to decide between the Sears and Atari.

 

I'm not interested in how rare it is, since I will be buying it to play, not to sell. So I'm not really concerned if it's a Sunnyvale or not.

 

Darryl,

Thanks for the reply. It's looking like a Light Sixer is the way I'll go. As far as soldering, I'm good enough to to replace the capacitors and stuff. Desoldering things like joystick ports is where my skills need more work. I figure it's due to a lack of proper desoldering equipment. With help from members here, I could do the necessary troubleshooting and repairs, but I'd feel better just buying a working/refurbished console. Since I'm almost 100% sure I'm going to go with a light sixer, I'm not as concerned with not being able to afford it. I'm sure my Vader and 7800 will bring enough money to pay for a nice console. I already have the carts, joysticks and paddles.

 

Now I just need to decide, Sears or Atari and get to work selling stuff. :-D

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Well, my plans to get a sixer may have just been ruined. I was on my way home from my father's house tonight and my headlights went out and so did my heater. I checked online and it turns out that Ford, it their infinite wisdom, linked the climate control module to the automatic headlights. In the process of doing so, they introduced a bug into the system that causes different electronics to just shut down. It can be the power windows, the headlights, the heater/ac, the radio, the advanced traction system, or any number of other important things. That means I HAVE to get it fixed. I can buy a working used unit for around $50, but there's no guarantee on it. I can send mine off to have it rebuilt (meaning I have no vehicle for a couple of weeks) but I get a 90 day warranty for $150, or I can order a new module for around $400 that may be a permanent fix or it may fail after 90 days, just like the rebuild. So I'll definitely be selling stuff now. :(

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I've had both. The difference is very noticeable, in both feel and look.

I've never had either of them, so I don't know that I would notice the difference. I meant to look at some photos of the two side by side to see if that difference was enough for me to want one or the other more. I just haven't gotten around to it. I think having all 6 switches on the front is really what I'm missing when I look at my Vader.

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I've never had either of them, so I don't know that I would notice the difference. I meant to look at some photos of the two side by side to see if that difference was enough for me to want one or the other more. I just haven't gotten around to it. I think having all 6 switches on the front is really what I'm missing when I look at my Vader.

 

Not only are there six switches, but the ports on the back are lower as a consequence of having two boards.

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The vader, for better or worse, likes or dislikes, is a cost-cut version of the light-sixer, which is again a cost-cut version of the heavy sixer. Those switches on the back are simply bastardized.

 

While I prefer the looks of the light sixer better (more angular front), I prefer the better engineering and materials in the heavy sixer. The H6 is also what I had as a kid in 1977.

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