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Fix a shorting out s-video port on a tv?


GradualGames
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I've got a Sony Trinitron which is just a gorgeous piece of retro gaming hardware. Playing systems with s-video on it is to die for. sadly however, the s-video port on it appears to be shorting out plugged in to my rgb modded nes (it has an s-video port as well). I made sure to test the same modded nes on the s-video port on my framemeister, no issue, same cable. So I'm fairly certain at this point the s-video port on this television is faulty.

 

I'm planning to finally learn to solder so I'm wondering if I were to open up this TV if:

 

-I will die from discharge of large capacitors

-How could I troubleshoot any issues with the s-video port

-Is this even worth bothering with or should I sell this TV as-is with s-video flaw and buy a refurbished one

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shorting out is a often misused term, loosing connection is most likely the issue vs something so darn loose its flopping around and touching ground

 

if you are planning to finally to learn to solder, dont do it on this, go grab a crap radio or a dvd player from the thrift store and murder that, once the killing dies down then think about working on the tv

 

I will die from discharge of large capacitors?

 

if its unplugged you might just piss your pants (unless you have a heart condition, and never ever mess with a crt with it plugged in unless you know what you are doing!), let it sit in a dark closet unplugged for a few days (the crt can charge itself if exposed to light, the rest should bleed off and balance out), avoid anything large, has a heat sink, or is isolated with a slot cut into the PCB

 

How could I troubleshoot any issues with the s-video port

 

I would bet that its simply a broken solder connection and that soldering the pins again with a little bit of fresh solder

 

Is this even worth bothering with or should I sell this TV as-is with s-video flaw and buy a refurbished one

 

Sure its worth a look, what is it, like 6 screws, dont touch anything that looks nasty (trust me you can tell) touch up some solder points, then ask that question again

 

I again am willing to bet if you lay the thing tube face down and take off the back you can have easy access to at least visual the Svideo port without even touching anything inside

Edited by Osgeld
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Well.. I've not actually gotten into the back of a CRT but I've worked on a few arcade cabs and recapped a few monitors. So to answer your question, you need to be very careful regarding the area around the large caps near the power supply section of the TV and filter caps on the CRT chassis driver board in addition to the CRT itself. STAY away from the suction cup like thing on the tube. It is actually an anode wire, but supplies the high voltage to the CRT from the flyback transformer it is attached to.

 

My guess is that the s-video jack on the TV has some loose solder joints and you might be able to get at that by taking the back off the TV, then carefully lay it on its side to see if you can then access the underside of the main board the AV out connections are on.

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  • 2 weeks later...

 

Why did you change your original quoted answer? In any event, if you have it powered on or not, stay away from the anode wire going into the tube.

I think that Osgeld was going for a laugh - I chuckled at any rate. He's a jokester at times. Full of info at other times.

 

Thank you for a detailed walkthrough - I myself have an Commodore 1804 and am wondering about the inevitable same thing. We're all getting older and so are our machines. The good news is that we're getting sillier. At least I hope that's good news....

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My friend was working on an old arcade cab and accidentally brushed against that suction cup dealio and it flung him into a wall!

 

 

while there is quite the blast of energy, espeically in larger tubes, every time I have gotten whacked by one (while not powered) its been more of a reaction than the discharge itself

 

for instance I gave myself a rather nasty small burn touching the wrong end of a hot air gun that was set to full freaking blast with the back of my pinky finger (protip dont put your hot air station in front of a plug strip, then go and try to plug something in), darn near 600f, it hurt, it still hurts like a bugger, but not as much as the gash on my index finger when I jerked my hand back and whacked the underside of a sheet metal shelf

 

:-)

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I think the worst shock I ever got it you want to call it through..didn't actually shock me at all. But it burned a nice cauterized pinhole in my thumb. It was while I was changing out some CCFL tubes in an old point of sale screen. I only had one tube of the two connected and wasn't paying attention when I turned it on. Pretty soon I could smell something and when I looked down (As I could then feel the burning at this point). I saw a lovely little purple arc of plasma shooting off one of the CCFL connector ends that I had forgotten to connect to the bottom tube, just discharging straight into my thumb. It was quite surreal to me because it didn't hurt that much and I was surprised to see what looked like a 1/16" arc of purple electricity just going into my thumb. High voltage inverters don't carry a ton of current, but they have a heck of a lot of voltage in them!?

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