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Gaming LEGENDS at CGE


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CONFIRMED.

 

Jim Huether

 

Jim Huether's bibliography reads much like a classic gaming primer, as it contains a great number of "required" gaming experiences mixed with bunches of "staples" that any retro gamer worth his salt should have cut his or her teeth on.

 

In the late 1970's and early 80's, Jim designed a plethora of titles for various Atari systems, including some unreleased games that make for some interesting history. Among these, the Atari 2600 classics Flag Capture and Sky Diver. He designed Steeplechase, which became a Sears exclusive, and is also credited with the co-design of RealSports Volleyball and an unreleased football game. He's responsible for the sheer joy that is RealSports Football and Xevious on the Atari 5200 SuperSystem and even has an unreleased Atari 8-bit computer game called Micro Movie.

 

Jim has since been with other publishers, including Epyx and Sega. You'll find his name in the credits of such games as The Sporting News Baseball, California Games II, the StreetSports series, Cartoon Maker, Joe Montana Football, Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse - and many more - as a designer or producer of a vast library of games.

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Karl Anderson: Atari coin-op programmer on pre-Firefox laserdisc-based games like The Last Starfighter.  

 

Ok explain this one to me. From what I understand Firefox and TLSF were in development around the same time (late 83 through mid 84), so I don't think TLSF predates Firefox. Also IIRC TLSF was going to be a raster Star Wars type game and not a Laserdisc game.

 

Can you clear this up for me?

 

Tempest

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CONFIRMED.

 

Bob Polaro

 

bpolaro.jpgBob Polaro got his start in programming with Adam Systems, where he developed various accounting packages for the Data General Nova II computer in the 1970's. He then joined Commodore, where he created the programs Baseball, Stock Portfolio and Blackjack for the Commodore Pet computer.

 

Having an affinity for games, Polaro hooked up with Atari, where he was responsible for the 400/800 computer games Lemonade Stand, Hangman and Mugwump as well as reference titles such as States And Capitals and Biorhythm.

 

The fun really began, however, when he started working on Atari 2600 games. Defender is his most notable masterpiece, although others like RealSports Volleyball, Desert Falcon, SprintMaster and Road Runner were excellent titles in their own right. He briefly worked for Activision in the mid-1980's, where he developed the 2600 version of Rampage for the company.

 

Soon thereafter he founded BOBCO, where he programmed several geography software pieces for the Commodore 64 and Apple II computers. In the early 1990's he was back to working on videogames. While at T*HQ, he was the lead designer of Bass Masters Classic for the Super Nintendo and assisted in the Sega Genesis translation as well. He now designs Arcade Video redemption and online games for Arcade Planet (formerly Lazertron).

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CONFIRMED.

 

Matt Hubbard

 

Matt Hubbard started at Atari in 1980, where he wrote Submarine Commander for the Atari 2600, a game released as a Sears exclusive. He was beginning work on the Baseball game for the Atari 5200 when he left for Activision, where he wrote Dolphin for the 2600, Zenji for the Atari 800/400 and the unreleased Queen Bee for the Commodore 64.

 

Other work in the industry includes programming work for Electronic Arts' Road Rash II for the Sega Genesis and Lucasfilm Games' Defenders of Dynatron City for the NES. He returned to school in 1999 and finished his master's degree in mathematics at Cal State Hayward in 2001; he is currently enrolled at UC Davis, where he is studying for a doctorate in math.

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I really enjoy meeting the "new faces" at CGE - it always means new stories or at least connects older stories. At most it leads to the recovery of previously unreleased titles.

 

CONFIRMED.

 

David Stifel

 

David was an Intellivision programer at Mattel Electronics, where he programmed the 1983 Intellivision Demonstration Cartridge. His next assignment was Game Factory, on the ECS component, which he completed literally on the final day Mattel Electronics shut its dooors for good.

 

Today, David is a character actor in southern California and has appeared in such films as Minority Report and Gods and Generals.

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CONFIRMED.

 

Garth Clowes

 

Garth founded Entex Industries, Inc. in 1969. Entex became a leader in electronic products building up to worldwide sales of close to $100 million utilizing many of Clowes' inventions including the world's first true voice recognition products and the first multi-player electronic games. Entex is best known in videogame circles for it's incredible line of handheld games including the best-selling Space Invaders, as well as the highly sought after Adventurevision console.

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CONFIRMED.

 

Bill Wentworth

 

Although Bill doesn't like to brag about his skills, he is a true graphics genius. Bill has almost 20 years of experience in the graphic design field and has inked some of the best game covers around including numerous titles for Absolute Entertainment. He is currently the Vice President of Creative Development at Skyworks Technologies.

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CONFIRMED.

 

Garry Kitchen

 

gkitchen.jpgWith over 18 years of experience in interactive electronics, Garry Kitchen has been in multimedia entertainment since the beginning. His innovative hand-held electronic game Bank Shot, marketed by Parker Brothers in 1980, was named one of the 10 best toys of the year by Omni Magazine. In 1982, Kitchen designed and programmed Coleco's smash hit Atari version of the Donkey Kong arcade game, a video game cartridge whose sales eclipsed $100 million dollars. Moving onto Activision, Kitchen's 1982 release Keystone Kapers received critical acclaim and achieved worldwide sales of over 750,000 units. Space Jockey and Pressure Cooker, also for the Atari VCS, were highly regarded as well. Garry Kitchen's Gamemaker, a top-selling Activision title for the Commodore 64, earned Kitchen the title of Video Game Designer of the Year in 1985.

 

In 1986, Kitchen founded Absolute Entertainment, Inc., building it into one of the leading video game developers in North America. Under his leadership, Absolute created over 120 software titles while working with such leading entertainment companies as Nintendo, Sega, Sony, 3DO, Paramount Pictures, MCA, 20th Century Fox, Acclaim, and Electronic Arts. Kitchen's 1991 release, The Simpsons: Bart vs. the Space Mutants, published by Acclaim Entertainment, was praised by Variety Magazine as a breakthrough in the video game licensing of television properties. The "Bart vs...." line of Simpsons games went on to sell over 2 million units, establishing Bart and family as a mainstay property in entertainment software. Kitchen's 1992 release, Super Battletank, was named Best Simulation Game by Game Informer Magazine.

 

Kitchen has received numerous awards for his work, including a Lifetime Achievement Award in Video Games. His knowledge and experience in interactive entertainment is well respected, with numerous television appearances including CNBC, ABC Eyewitness News and CNN as well as interviews in various consumer and trade publications.

 

By treating the Internet as the latest in a series of video game platforms, Kitchen brings this unique blend of talents to the Internet. He is co-founder and President/Chief Executive of Skyworks Technologies, Inc., a privately held multimedia developer specializing in interactive marketing and high-end game development. In addition, Skyworks is an authorized developer for the Sony Playstation video game platform. Skyworks' clients include the LifeSavers Company, the Nabisco Biscuit Company, the Sega Channel, Micronet Co. Ltd., Scientific American and others.

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CONFIRMED.

 

David Crane

 

dcrane.jpgDavid Crane is one of the most successful designers of entertainment software in the world. His award winning video games, led by Pitfall!, Ghostbusters, A Boy and His Blob, and Amazing Tennis are acknowledged as some of the most innovative and popular in the interactive entertainment industry. Crane, a founder of Activision in 1979, has consistently produced superb products, as evidenced by his worldwide sales of over 10 million games and wholesale revenues near 200 million dollars. Prior to his days at Activision, Crane was employed at Atari, where he wrote such hits as Outlaw, Slot Machine and Canyon Bomber. He was also instrumental in the design of the Atari 800 computer's operating system.

 

Crane's industry awards continue to mount with each new product. Pitfall! maintained the top slot on the Billboard charts for 64 weeks and was named video game of the year in 1982. Besides selling millions of copies worldwide, it spawned a Saturday morning television cartoon and numerous other spinoffs. Pitfall II: Lost Caverns was also the number one rated game in the country for over six months and won the 1984 Golden Floppy award for best game and the Video Adventure Game of the Year award for 1984 from Electronic Games. The Activision Decathlon was in the top 20 video games for more than one year and won several sports game awards. Reviewers Katz & Kunkel called Decathlon a "masterwork and a true classic." Other Activision hits written by Crane include Dragster, Fishing Derby, Laser Blast, Freeway, Grand Prix, Skateboardin' and Super Skateboardin' (the last one was for the Atari 7800).

 

Ghostbusters, Crane's 9th release for Activision was lauded by Ahoy! magazine's publisher who said that he had "never so thoroughly enjoyed playing or even watching a game as entertaining as this one. Activision may even accomplish what few if any have been able to do: successfully release a video/computer game derived from a major motion picture." As predicted, Ghostbusters achieved unprecedented sales in the United States, throughout Europe, and Japan. Crane's Little Computer People was awarded the 1985 award for the most innovative program of the year by the Computer Entertainer. A Boy and His Blob received the best of show award at its introduction and was the video game of the year for 1989. Further, the Parents' Choice Foundation awarded A Boy and His Blob the 1990 Parents' Choice Award for portraying "Positive human values", "High quality software", "Intelligent design", and the "Ability to hold the player's interest." Crane was named designer of the year in 1983 and 1984 by Video Game Update, Video Review and Computer Entertainer. His works have been called "beyond belief" and "offering the most remarkable breadth of any videogame(s) yet produced" by Electronic Games Magazine.

 

While often overshadowed in the public eye by his software products, Crane's hardware accomplishments are equally impressive. In addition to a variety of custom development systems, Crane has designed two integrated circuits for video game use - The Display Processor Chip or DPC, which was awarded a patent for its unique video memory system, and a chip which offered the most innovative method of bank selecting in the industry. Wherever there is new technology or new entertainment opportunities, Crane can be found at the forefront.

 

By treating the Internet as the latest in a series of video game platforms, Crane brings this unique blend of talents to the Internet. He is co-founder and Chief Technology Officer of Skyworks Technologies, Inc., a privately held multimedia developer specializing in interactive marketing and high-end game development. In addition, Skyworks is an authorized developer for the Sony Playstation video game platform. Skyworks' clients include the LifeSavers Company, the Nabisco Biscuit Company, the Sega Channel, Micronet Co. Ltd., Scientific American and others.

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CONFIRMED.

 

Mark Richards

 

Mark Richards was the original host of "Starcade," cable television's first original TV game show featuring arcade games. Alex Trebek hosted the original pilot and Mark hosted the first 26 weeks of the series that aired on Ted Turner's WTBS from December 1982 through June 1983.

 

I'm presently working with Mr. Richards to host a LIVE Starcade at CGE. Think about it - we've got everything we need right there. Arcade machines for the competitions, monitors for the "name the game" challenge, trivia questions for the contestants to buzz in with... and the real capper, G4 TV's camera crew. G4 presently reruns Starcade.

 

To be continued!

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I think once a year is more than enough to revisit the Vectex machine. Really' date=' classic game does have a cool nostalgic factor involved' date=' but you really can't count on anything different to be revealed at this or next or any years show. Isn't this show really just a meeting place for an inner circle of cellar dewellers to come outta their dungeons once a year to congregate, share body odor and where their cool sci-fi shirts?[/quote'']

 

 

whoa - that's not nice

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Well, I can't find this quote anyplace on their site, but let's take it bit by bit, shall we?

 

I think once a year is more than enough to revisit the Vectex machine.  
"Vectrex," Gomer. It's called a "Vectrrrrrrrrrrex."
Really, classic game does have a cool nostalgic factor involved, but you really can't count on anything different to be revealed at this or next or any years show.
I think the homebrewers here and there would have something to say about that. I also believe the protos that are mass-produced for the masses also shoot holes in that comment. Hell, AA has a strong store base of releasing new stuff for classic systems.
Isn't this show really just a meeting place for an inner circle of cellar dewellers to come outta their dungeons once a year to congregate, share body odor and where their cool sci-fi shirts?
First off, it's "wear," Gomer. "Wear." Second of all, you're thinking of GenCon with that statement. Third of all, this is the kind of person that Game Jam now hopes to attract. xBoX RuLeZ! :roll:
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Well, I can't find this quote anyplace on their site, but let's take it bit by bit, shall we?

 

I think once a year is more than enough to revisit the Vectex machine.  
"Vectrex," Gomer. It's called a "Vectrrrrrrrrrrex."
Really, classic game does have a cool nostalgic factor involved, but you really can't count on anything different to be revealed at this or next or any years show.
I think the homebrewers here and there would have something to say about that. I also believe the protos that are mass-produced for the masses also shoot holes in that comment. Hell, AA has a strong store base of releasing new stuff for classic systems.
Isn't this show really just a meeting place for an inner circle of cellar dewellers to come outta their dungeons once a year to congregate, share body odor and where their cool sci-fi shirts?
First off, it's "wear," Gomer. "Wear." Second of all, you're thinking of GenCon with that statement. Third of all, this is the kind of person that Game Jam now hopes to attract. xBoX RuLeZ! :roll:

 

 

Sir, it was right here all along - right under our noses:

http://www.actiontrip.com/rei/comments_new...tml?id=062303_4

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I'd go in there and start kickin' asses, but I don't want to get my new white sneakers dirty. :D

 

Let's get back to the subject at hand. MARK RICHARDS OF STARCADE. Jumpin' Christmas. And it appears that a Starcade Live event WILL happen. How cool izzat?

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