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mizapf

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I'm in the southern western Arkansas 60 miles north east of Shreveport and we are so dry and need the rain so badly but I think it's going to just miss.

The 10-day weather report says 40% chance on Monday and everything else nothing

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29 minutes ago, GDMike said:

I'm in the southern western Arkansas 60 miles north east of Shreveport and we are so dry and need the rain so badly but I think it's going to just miss.

The 10-day weather report says 40% chance on Monday and everything else nothing

You can have some of my rain here in south east Georgia. I'm tryiong to remove and repair my wife's transmission and am almost to the point of getting it ready to drop when we get a downpour. Irritating to say the least.

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12 minutes ago, RickyDean said:

You can have some of my rain here in south east Georgia. I'm tryiong to remove and repair my wife's transmission and am almost to the point of getting it ready to drop when we get a downpour. Irritating to say the least.

OMG, I remember when I was a kid we lived in Warner Robins, Ga. I don't think the humidity dropped below 70% there. :) 

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Duh, East. Been to Brunswick several times.When I worked for IT for the American Heart Assoc. we had an office in Brunswick which was ran by a couple little old ladies who had a way of breaking PCs that was always, creative. 😁

Very nice area, though. I kinda remembered a city called Odum on the way, I usually drove from Atlanta via WR where I would see some old friends.

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3 minutes ago, hloberg said:

Sorta weather related, The Hurricane in Houston knocked out most of the internet in the San Antonio and surround areas today for about 1/2 day.

The hurricane leftovers are hitting us here in Toronto Canada in a few hours with lots of rain for the next 48 hours.

 

As for your power outages just check the burger app: https://www.fox26houston.com/news/whataburger-app-power-outage-tracker-houston

 

 

Edited by Gary from OPA
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27 minutes ago, Gary from OPA said:

The hurricane leftovers are hitting us here in Toronto Canada in a few hours with lots of rain for the next 48 hours.

 

As for your power outages just check the burger app: https://www.fox26houston.com/news/whataburger-app-power-outage-tracker-houston

 

 

Huh.  Rather ingenious.  I usually use PowerOutage.us, and it does report that the CPE outage management system is offline:

 

https://poweroutage.us/area/state/texas

Screenshot2024-07-09at22-23-02HarrisPowerOutages.thumb.png.154447195dfbfb7cf02f16b28eb4386b.png

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We are fortunate to have had our neighborhood’s power restored earlier today. The house temps had climbed to 86F by that point, with sunny skies, minimal wind, and outside temp of 92F with RH around 65%.  Yuck.
 

The damage done by wind and water is substantial.  The power companies are optimistic of 50% recovery by Wednesday but that still leaves a million or more to fix. The largest provider seems to have been improperly prepared, but it’s hard to know for certain given the current rhetoric.  
 

I listened to the news in disbelief as some people were complaining that government didn’t warn them to buy gasoline and supplies (there was plenty of warning).    Self accountability and awareness seem scarcer these days.  

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19 minutes ago, InsaneMultitasker said:

I listened to the news in disbelief as some people were complaining that government didn’t warn them to buy gasoline and supplies (there was plenty of warning).    Self accountability and awareness seem scarcer these days.

I heard this a few times when I worked with DEM.  Fuu..........

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12 hours ago, OLD CS1 said:

I heard this a few times when I worked with DEM.  Fuu..........

that is so ridiculous. Even with us living 2 hours inland we have a hurricane kit and plan. a little divergence and we could have been looking at a Cat 1 this last weekend. 

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8 hours ago, hloberg said:

that is so ridiculous. Even with us living 2 hours inland we have a hurricane kit and plan. a little divergence and we could have been looking at a Cat 1 this last weekend. 

I just have this to say, then I will shut up about it.  I know people who have lived in Florida for all their lives and may be unprepared for or complacent about hurricanes.  I know people who have lived in Florida for all their lives and take hurricanes more seriously, from moderately prepared to overly prepared.  But I have never known anyone who lived in Florida all their lives and demanded to know why someone else did not do something for them.

 

About 20 years ago I could say that the only people who ever complain about government not doing enough, or not telling them what to do -- there are plenty of outreach and preparedness campaigns out there -- were imports from states (or countries) who never experienced a hurricane.  But over the past 10 years I began hearing more people "when's FEMA going to get here?!" or "when is the state going to do x for us?!"  And I am not talking in devastated areas, like when Michael came through.

 

One of the things I did when I started working for emergency management was I bought a generator, I stock up and fuel and propane for the generator (and cars if I should need it,) I keep cash on-hand, water and a disaster food supply in addition to our regular stores, and supplies for self-protection in the absence of law enforcement.  I have been seriously asked why I feel I need to do all this.  Frankly, because of what I saw at DEM.

 

I do not mean that derogatorily.  I mean that as state and county emergency management agencies are busy putting things back together on a grand scale, mainly infrastructure, individually, we have a simple and usually easy role to play.  We are tasked with making sure that we can make it through the weeks it may take, or months in extreme cases like in the very rural counties demolished by Michael, while the state and counties put back together the roads, work with utilities to get power, water, and sanitation back up.  The very least we can do is be prepared to take care of our own survival in any situation.

 

Private industry is a big part of recovery, and it works hand-in-hand with public sector when necessary.  Gas stations need gas: Florida has transportation contracts above and beyond private contracts to get fuel where it is needed.  Same with food and water.  Utilities need to fix infrastructure: while most utilities have mutual aid agreements with other utilities (we had linemen from various states, as far as Illinois,) the state and counties will waive permitting to get things back up.  Same with communications.  Some industries may need additional man-power, and the county and then the state will assist with what they cannot organize themselves.

 

But these people think FEMA or the FDEM are going to ride in on a white horse, lift them up, dust them off, and give them a cozy pat on the ass.  While there are some extreme cases where that is necessary, such as when all your preparations are just not enough and the world falls out from under you, the general case should not be this way, and it is those general cases who tend to bitch and whinge the most about it.

 

While I was not an active part of FDEM, I saw and supported during blue and grey skies.  While there are exceptions in which we have seen the failures of emergency management for various reasons, the rule is these people work their asses off at all times.  So then for people who are capable of preparing and should know to be prepared, it is frustrating to listen to the cries of dependence on someone else to do very basic things.

 

We also seem to have lost the idea of what real community is.  These days, far too many people use community as shield, a talking point, or a way to describe a group a think-tank of people.  Whereas, communities are built from people willing to sacrifice their time, their labor, offering up their blood, sweat, and tears to help their neighbors in real and tangible ways.  Look at Joplin after the tornadoes, as one of many, many grand-scale examples.

 

Anyway.  I no longer work for FDEM, nor do I presume to speak for the division or the people who work there.

 

Done.

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we had FEMA here in New Braunfels helping people from the Hurricane. Not sure what they were doing for them this far inland. looked like they had a generator truck. maybe getting ready to setup temp housing if need be?

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8 minutes ago, OLD CS1 said:

I just have this to say, then I will shut up about it.  I know people who have lived in Florida for all their lives and may be unprepared for or complacent about hurricanes.  I know people who have lived in Florida for all their lives and take hurricanes more seriously, from moderately prepared to overly prepared.  But I have never known anyone who lived in Florida all their lives and demanded to know why someone else did not do something for them.

 

About 20 years ago I could say that the only people who ever complain about government not doing enough, or not telling them what to do -- there are plenty of outreach and preparedness campaigns out there -- were imports from states (or countries) who never experienced a hurricane.  But over the past 10 years I began hearing more people "when's FEMA going to get here?!" or "when is the state going to do x for us?!"  And I am not talking in devastated areas, like when Michael came through.

 

One of the things I did when I started working for emergency management was I bought a generator, I stock up and fuel and propane for the generator (and cars if I should need it,) I keep cash on-hand, water and a disaster food supply in addition to our regular stores, and supplies for self-protection in the absence of law enforcement.  I have been seriously asked why I feel I need to do all this.  Frankly, because of what I saw at DEM.

 

I do not mean that derogatorily.  I mean that as state and county emergency management agencies are busy putting things back together on a grand scale, mainly infrastructure, individually, we have a simple and usually easy role to play.  We are tasked with making sure that we can make it through the weeks it may take, or months in extreme cases like in the very rural counties demolished by Michael, while the state and counties put back together the roads, work with utilities to get power, water, and sanitation back up.  The very least we can do is be prepared to take care of our own survival in any situation.

 

Private industry is a big part of recovery, and it works hand-in-hand with public sector when necessary.  Gas stations need gas: Florida has transportation contracts above and beyond private contracts to get fuel where it is needed.  Same with food and water.  Utilities need to fix infrastructure: while most utilities have mutual aid agreements with other utilities (we had linemen from various states, as far as Illinois,) the state and counties will waive permitting to get things back up.  Same with communications.  Some industries may need additional man-power, and the county and then the state will assist with what they cannot organize themselves.

 

But these people think FEMA or the FDEM are going to ride in on a white horse, lift them up, dust them off, and give them a cozy pat on the ass.  While there are some extreme cases where that is necessary, such as when all your preparations are just not enough and the world falls out from under you, the general case should not be this way, and it is those general cases who tend to bitch and whinge the most about it.

 

While I was not an active part of FDEM, I saw and supported during blue and grey skies.  While there are exceptions in which we have seen the failures of emergency management for various reasons, the rule is these people work their asses off at all times.  So then for people who are capable of preparing and should know to be prepared, it is frustrating to listen to the cries of independence on someone else to do very basic things.

 

We also seem to have lost the idea of what real community is.  These days, far too many people use community as shield, a talking point, or a way to describe a group a think-tank of people.  Whereas, communities are built from people willing to sacrifice their time, their labor, offering up their blood, sweat, and tears to help their neighbors in real and tangible ways.  Look at Joplin after the tornadoes, as one of many, many grand-scale examples.

 

Anyway.  I no longer work for FDEM, nor do I presume to speak for the division or the people who work there.

 

Done.

one thing always got me is when people build in obvious flood zones then complain when their house is constantly being flooded. One guy locally who had a farm in a flood zone had his house on a slab raised 20 ft on pillars, slab and all, after the umpteenth flood.

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