Jump to content
IGNORED

Monday Quick Contest #2: the constitutional quiz


davidcalgary29

Recommended Posts

The first person to answer the following question correctly, in this thread, will win:

 

Ms. Pac-Man, Atlantis, and Pole Position (on cart) for the Atari XL/XE.

 

Q. Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin decides that he's had enough of mad-cow border closures and software lumber disputes, and unilaterally decides that he's going to sue the United States to get Canada admitted as the 51st state. He doesn't know much about the American constitution, but recalls that, at one time, the United States invited Canada to join the United States as a state.

 

Paul Martin is currently preparing his legal brief to present to the US Supreme Court in his suit to sue to join the US. Where would he find some legal ammo to support his position? Would he win?

 

Note: you can assume that Martin can unilaterally take this action for the purpose of this question.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd probably reference the 1868 Supreme Court decision that let Texas stay a US State (defined states as having common interests):

 

Texas v. White, 74 U.S. 700 (1868) (USSC+)

 

and this piece of the Constitution lets you do it as well though Congress:

 

Article IV, Section 3 of the United States Constitution states "New states may be admitted by the Congress into this union; but no new states shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other state....without the consent of the legislature of the states concerned as well as Congress".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd probably reference the 1868 Supreme Court decision that let Texas stay a US State (defined states as having common interests):

 

Texas v. White, 74 U.S. 700 (1868) (USSC+)

 

and this piece of the Constitution lets you do it as well though Congress:

 

Article IV, Section 3 of the United States Constitution states "New states may be admitted by the Congress into this union; but no new states shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other state....without the consent of the legislature of the states concerned as well as Congress".

 

Wow! That's certainly more impressive than my question! But that's not it. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Articles of Confederation:

 

11: "Canada acceding to this confederation, and adjoining in the measures of the United States, shall be admitted into, and entitled to all the advantages of this Union; but no other colony shall be admitted into the same, unless such admission be agreed to by nine States."

 

 

The offer was never officially rescinded. Canada meets all other requirements for statehood. So I imagine Canada would be granted statehood if it really wanted to.

 

Oddly enough, there are apparently, according to the US Expansionist Party, poliitcal groups in several providences that DO want to become US States.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most constitutional experts believe that the offer extended to Canada expired when the Constitution came into effect, but I'm not a constitutional expert, and that's good enough for me. Well done!

 

Tony, if you'll PM me with your address, I'll send you those carts, as well as an odd boxed SMS game that I picked up over the weekend. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...