Jump to content
IGNORED

LJN Video Art


Lendorien

Recommended Posts

Most people know LJN because of the pile of rather dubious games they released for the NES (some, imortalized in reviews by the Angry Video Game Nerd). This weekend, I discovered they made a console too.

 

I found one at a Goodwill for fairly cheap with three cartridges included. It wasn't working quite right when I got it, necessitating taking it apart to figure out the issue. Turned out it had carbon dot buttons, much like the Atari 5200. Some aluminum foil later and it works fine again... such as it is.

 

The LJN Video Art is a "edutainment" product released by LJN in 1987. Consisting of a console using interchangeable cartridges and a single specialized joystick, it can not exactly be classified as a game console, since its functionality is that of an electronic coloring book.

Cartridges contain uncolored line art images that are displayed on the television screen. The "player" then uses the specialized controller to move a cursor on the the screen to color in the images. Colors may be chosen using a slider on the top end of the controller. Buttons on the console itself allow the player to change the background color, change the cursor to an eraser and change the "page" to a new image.

The nine (or more) available cartridges came with a story book to use in conjunction with the Video Art console.

 

I'm going to hook it up for my Video game party this weekend, along side Pong. It'll be fun to see which one of my firends wastes much time on this... thing.

 

Does anyone have one of these? Thoughts? Memories? Head shakings?

 

post-22224-0-50514300-1386833078_thumb.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

All things considered, it's a terrible product. I mean, I tried coloring with it and it's not as easy as the commercial makes it seem. It likes to stick on lines and diagonals, making it hard to draw with... sort of like Etch a scetch a suppose. Seriously.

 

Why would anyone have wanted to pay 100 bucks for something that you could have done far better and more easily for a 50 cent coloring book and a similairly priced box of crayons?

 

I guess it went into that 1980/90's catagory of "If it's electronic, it must be better!"

 

I wonder if this thing had the electronic chops enough to actually play any real games. I'm guessing it didn't have much of a processor, if any, but there would be a fun project, if you were into such a thing. LJN Video Art homebrew!

 

As an aside, does anyone have one of these and a scanner? I'd love to see what one of the story books or the manual looks like. Plus, it's always nice to archive stuff like this.

Edited by Lendorien
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It might just be a coincidence, but the look kinda reminds me of a computer toy by Yeno, "Prof Saitou". And that computer toy really feels like it was based on Epoch 's Super Cassette Vision (1984), which was sold by Yeno in France (and maybe Germany too).

 

dscf2400g.jpg

 

 

102711.jpg

 

 

epoch.jpg

 

 

prof.JPG

 

http://www.ina.fr/video/PUB3784153144

 

Tho, it might just be because it's a "low" res 8 or 16 color chip used in all those systems .

 

But I wouldn't be surprised that after the SCV epic failure (the Famicom obliterated it) Epoch sold the "plaftorm" to anyone willing to have a "ready-to-use" video system.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

I feel bad my mom wasted money on this for me. This was while I still had a 2600 and no Nintendo yet somewhere around 1987 I guess...and I was getting tired of the 2600 with seeing all the Nintendo commercials.

This was a dud and they should have returned everyone's money. Couldn't draw a damn thing.

Most people know LJN because of the pile of rather dubious games they released for the NES (some, imortalized in reviews by the Angry Video Game Nerd). This weekend, I discovered they made a console too.

 

I found one at a Goodwill for fairly cheap with three cartridges included. It wasn't working quite right when I got it, necessitating taking it apart to figure out the issue. Turned out it had carbon dot buttons, much like the Atari 5200. Some aluminum foil later and it works fine again... such as it is.

 

The LJN Video Art is a "edutainment" product released by LJN in 1987. Consisting of a console using interchangeable cartridges and a single specialized joystick, it can not exactly be classified as a game console, since its functionality is that of an electronic coloring book.

Cartridges contain uncolored line art images that are displayed on the television screen. The "player" then uses the specialized controller to move a cursor on the the screen to color in the images. Colors may be chosen using a slider on the top end of the controller. Buttons on the console itself allow the player to change the background color, change the cursor to an eraser and change the "page" to a new image.

The nine (or more) available cartridges came with a story book to use in conjunction with the Video Art console.

 

I'm going to hook it up for my Video game party this weekend, along side Pong. It'll be fun to see which one of my firends wastes much time on this... thing.

 

Does anyone have one of these? Thoughts? Memories? Head shakings?

 

attachicon.gif$(KGrHqQOKpMFJWO(gBYrBS,sYYNI8!~~60_57.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

I watch the commercial and wonder if it was originally supposed to have the paint fill option and other features, but was rushed out the door in an alpha or beta state.But the commercial still represented the product as it was supposed to be, and not how it actually was.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I watch the commercial and wonder if it was originally supposed to have the paint fill option and other features, but was rushed out the door in an alpha or beta state.But the commercial still represented the product as it was supposed to be, and not how it actually was.

We can suppose that what people got was a "basic" version, and had the product sold well, LJN would have sold the "advanced" cartridge, along with other carts.

Pretty much how "my first computer" toys of hte ea were sold with a Starting cartridge (or sometime, none) but usually came later with more advanced cartridges.

 

Or hell, like the Speak'n'Spell did.

Edited by CatPix
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 years later...

I bought mine just recently along with mickey mouse as part of my game collection,

that console actually looks pretty cool, it makes the nes look like being old designwise,

now i really don’t know about it’s capabilities as i can’t find any spec’s about it but in theory homebrewers could make games for it despite that system was only made with drawing & coloring stuff in mind, now am curious if i could use that ljn controller on a atari 2600 system and vice versa or could i damage both the system and those controllers as well because of the different pin outs???

it would be otherwise cool to play atari 2600 games with that controller or draw stuff on that ljn console just for the damn sake🤣

 

Edited by johannesmutlu
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...