Jump to content
IGNORED

"The Internet for Commodore Users" still available


RobertB
 Share

Recommended Posts

Back in the day, I bought the spiral-bound book, "The Internet for Commodore Users" by Gaelyne Gasson. It was the third, and little did I know at the time, it was the final edition. Every once in awhile, C= users ask about getting their machines on-line, and I refer them to TIFCU if it answers their questions. (TIFCU was written before C= wi-fi modems and other newer means of connecting.)
All these years I had thought that the book would never be seen again. I was wrong! In September I met with Gaelyne in Adelaide, South Australia, and she informed me that C= users can still access the book by downloading the .PDF. I was gladly surprised.
If you want your own copy of TIFCU, read the description at

http://market.vcsweb.net/about-tifcu-the-internet-for-commodore-users/

and click on the button at the bottom for purchasing information. If you just want to directly purchase TIFCU, go to

http://market.vcsweb.net/product/tifcu-the-internet-for-commodore-c64-128-users/

Writing from Roseburg, Oregon,
Robert Bernardo
Fresno Commodore User Group
http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I remember my grandmother telling me about "Q-Link" for the Commodore 64. She described it as "America Online" (vomit) for the Commodore 64. As I did more research on it, it seemed more like a BBS, though it was described as an "Online Service."

 

But I'm not familiar with the book,

Edited by Captain Kiwi
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I remember my grandmother telling me about "Q-Link" for the Commodore 64. She described it as "America Online" (vomit) for the Commodore 64. As I did more research on it, it seemed more like a BBS, though it was described as an "Online Service."

 

But I'm not familiar with the book,

Are you suggesting that BBS aren't "Online"?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you suggesting that BBS aren't "Online"?

 

I think what he meant was that BBS are more community run and are different from commercial "Online Services." Back in the day we made a distinction between Q-Link, CompuServe, and other so-called "Online Services," and the local BBS, often ran by some dude in his bedroom.

 

-dZ.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I think what he meant was that BBS are more community run and are different from commercial "Online Services." Back in the day we made a distinction between Q-Link, CompuServe, and other so-called "Online Services," and the local BBS, often ran by some dude in his bedroom.

 

-dZ.

 

Exactly what I was aiming for. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

I remember my grandmother telling me about "Q-Link" for the Commodore 64. She described it as "America Online" (vomit) for the Commodore 64. As I did more research on it, it seemed more like a BBS, though it was described as an "Online Service."

 

But I'm not familiar with the book,

You are making me feel old :) But, your grandmother was right, Q-Link actually became AOL. Q-Link disks seemed to come with everything (C64C's, disk drives, in the mail, etc) very much like you would see AOL CD-ROMs all over the place in the mid-late 90's. I was a member of Q-Link for a very long time and I thought it was great. Mainly the chat room feature which was something that was fun back in those days. Between that and D-Dial (diversi dial) I conducted sales, trades and met some really cool people that I still talk to and hang out with today.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried to sign up with Q-Link at the very end, but the system was so broken at that time that it was not accepting any more subscriptions. I even called the company to ask what could be done, but they didn't know how to fix it. However, I was a Delphi and GENie user for several years until they folded, too.

 

Never signed up for Compuserve,

Robert Bernardo

Fresno Commodore User Group

http://www.dickestel.com/fcug.htm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Q-Link even had a deal that let Commodore User Groups get online either really cheap or free (can't remember which), but since I was the Newsletter Editor back then for our group, I logged on throught that account to get the latest "news". I remember how fast my new 2400 baud modem was back then.

All in all, I think we were more productive through our local BBS, and Fido Net. It wasn't as much fun as Q-Link though.

Edited by motrucker
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember how fast my new 2400 baud modem was back then.

I first started with a 300 baud modem on my Commodore, and I could type faster than what was appearing on the screen. :) When I graduated to a 1200 baud Commodore 1670 modem, it was wonderful! Not long after that, I upgraded to a 2400 baud Aprotek Minimodem 24. I thought I was blazing through the Lynx browser then. Finally, I ended up with an external 56K modem hooked up to my Commodore through a Turbo-232 adapter. Downloads were so fast now (though the 56K modem would max out at 40K to 28K depending on which telephone lines I was using in various parts of California).

 

Truly,

Robert Bernardo

June 10-11 Pacific Commodore Expo NW -

http://www.portcommodore.com/pacommex

July 29-30 Commodore Vegas Expo v13 -

http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I first started with a 300 baud modem on my Commodore, and I could type faster than what was appearing on the screen. :) When I graduated to a 1200 baud Commodore 1670 modem, it was wonderful! Not long after that, I upgraded to a 2400 baud Aprotek Minimodem 24. I thought I was blazing through the Lynx browser then. Finally, I ended up with an external 56K modem hooked up to my Commodore through a Turbo-232 adapter. Downloads were so fast now (though the 56K modem would max out at 40K to 28K depending on which telephone lines I was using in various parts of California).

 

Sounds like the same progression I went through. I also had the Aprotek 2400 baud modem. I remember the live chats in Q-Link, and how backed up they would get, which was one reason I used the Local BBS more than Q-Link. By the time I went to 56K I was using an Amiga more than my C-128D. I remember that Gaelyne Gasson wrote a column back then, but I can't remember which magazine (I must be getting old). I had her book, which was interesting reading back then. I was a bit surprised to see she is still asking $10 for a PDF copy.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Q-Link became AOL in later time.

 

No, AOL existed in parallel and was marketing hard to Q-Link users to make the transition before the Q-Link shutdown date. IIRC, it was November 4, 1994, but I cannot remember exactly other than I was hanging out in Bonnie's Bar when the final shutdown message was displayed -- no fanfare, no thanks, just the standard "The System Has Shutdown."

 

There are plenty of break-downs and accounts of the Q-Link downward spiral detailing lost functionality, broken services, lost uploads, crashing areas of the system, and so on. I have read some conjecture that AOL had considered continuing running Q-Link, but differing reasons prevented it (again, what I have read or heard in passing, so do not take any of this as gospel): the server on which it ran had suffered too many failures to make any use other than ingesting into the AOL system a fool's errand, AOL management demanded that it be integrated into AOL's system to accommodate massive user surge, and whatever else I cannot recall.

 

Was anyone else there the night that Q-Link and AOL rooms spilled over into each other? That was fun and confusing stuff, and it gave birth to a number of conspiracy theories about what AOL was doing to kill Q-Link, how Q-Link really was AOL with a Commodore front-end, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

motrucker wrote:

 

> I remember that Gaelyne Gasson wrote a column back then, but I can't remember which magazine (I must be getting old).

 

It was Commodore World magazine, which came from Creative Micro Designs.

 

> I had her book, which was interesting reading back then. I was a bit surprised to see she is still asking $10 for a PDF copy.

 

I should buy the .PDF and give it as a gift to one of our Fresno Commodore User Group members.

 

Truly,

Robert Bernardo

June 10-11 Pacific Commodore Expo NW -

http://www.portcommodore.com/pacommex

July 29-30 Commodore Vegas Expo v13 -

http://www.portcommodore.com/commvex

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...