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XDS/22 with special TMS9995, TMS7742, and TMS34010


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I've unpacked the XDS/22 system and photographed the cards inside.  

 

There are 4 slots on the "hybrid" backplane.  These have two card edge sockets.  The  socket on the right has fewer than 100 pins.  Those traces go into unpopulated, 2x50, T-bus headers of slots 5-7. 

 

  1. BTT - breakpoint/trace/timing module.
  2. Emulator - card with TMS34010 graphics chip.  
  3. (empty)
  4. Interface - supports up to 3 RS232 ports. 


The BTT card is cabled to a pod labeled "Logic Show" having 4x20 gold pins.

 

The Emulator card has a heavy shielded cable, ending in a probe to connect to your card's (empty) 34010 socket. 

It also has a cable with female DB9.  Maybe a serial port?

 

The interface card goes into the "hybrid" bus edge connector of slot 4. It has only a few chips, including one TMS9902, but has footprints for two more 9902s.  In fact the PCB is completely filled by unpopulated footprints.   The card has 3 top connectors, with cables to 3 of the RS232 DB-25 ports back side of the XDS/22.  I guess that my card operates port D, described as Host Computer. (Ports A, B, C were intended for another terminal, printer, PROM programmer, or another XDS/22.)   

 

Slots 5-7 were advertised as T-Bus (TM990 bus), but the 100-position edge connectors are not populated.  I see that the "hybrid" bus traces mostly go straight into this T-bus. The XDS/33 would have used the T-Bus slots for the XMPL package:

 

5. TM990/103 User interface.  (with a TMS99105 CPU.)

6. TM990/233 XMPL Program Memory

7. (empty)

 

Photos (Epson Flatbed Scanner 1200 dpi)

 

BTT (Breakpoint/Trace/Timing) Card

 

BTT_Front_Color_1200dpi.thumb.jpg.cbd52bf5c186360d753469d402ee2673.jpgBTT_Back_Color_1200dpi.thumb.jpg.dc6ad1a03fc6d5ffae37d20ed9d5e673.jpg

 

 

Interface Card

 

9902_Front_Color_1200dpi.thumb.jpg.24b307c285e2729af821bebbce143b71.jpg9902_Back_Color_1200dpi.thumb.jpg.13125166d1b6e61ad790babb8e1c91ca.jpg

34010 Emulator with SE9996 (TMS9995 in DIP64 with 16-bit data bus brought out)

Emulator_34010_Front_Color_1200dpi.thumb.jpg.1ecba281414cf94aebcac8af2cae169b.jpgEmulator_34010_Back_Color_1200dpi.thumb.jpg.0dab7754f8a7ffd00a7e4105679e1784.jpg

... more photos coming ...

 

 

References

 

Bitsavers SPND0001A Texas Instruments TMS7000 Family Data Manual 1983
 

Bitsavers SCJ1271 Texas Instruments XDS22 TMS320C2x Emulator Users Guide 1988.pdf

 

Edited by FarmerPotato
Added more photos
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6 hours ago, FarmerPotato said:

What is the name for this PCB process?  Someone described it in a recent Pandemic club zoom.  Was it resin-on-metal?  It looks great.  

 

image.png.562810b703456b036796ae13ed897014.png

Multiwire. The "traces" are stacked wires embedded in an insulating matrix. https://worldwide.espacenet.com/patent/search/family/027084609/publication/US4175816A?q=pn%3DUS4175816

 

Nice pics!

Edited by jbdigriz
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The above photos are JPG-- less contrast on the traces than the uncompressed TIFF. I'm labeling the traces on my TIFF. 
 

I've followed the 16-bit data bus from the two EPROMs to 9996. Identified /DBIN.  Infer that A0 on CPU goes into a PAL, outputs to EPROM A0.  So the 27C512 is banked. 
 

Starting to look like a 9995 die rotated  180 degrees. 

Metal traces use right angles. Traces fear and avoid being drilled at thru holes. 
 

I see tiny spurs branch off as  traces route around a thru hole. Or, I infer a  connection because otherwise pin is NC. 


 

 

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EPROMs dumped. They are two 27C512 64Kx8, supplying even byte and odd byte.  I combined them into one 128Kx8 file. Disassembly begins. 
 

From here on, I'll use byte offsets into the image.

 

There are four 32K banks in there. The first bank, 0000-7ffe (bytes), has some blank space at the end.  The second bank, 8000-FFFE (bytes), starts with 1K of zeroes. Lots  of string data in this bank. The string's full address (like ef7a) is given to XOP 1. I'm calling that PRINT. 
 

The string prompts indicate a full featured loader, debugger , and an assembler for 34010 code. 
 

Speculation:

Logical Address map:

0000-03fe is not paged. 
0400-7ffe might be paged. (EDIT: the PAL operates on the top 2 address bits, so a page is 8Kx16.  In bytes,  16K of the 64K address space.)
8000-bffe is the 16K static RAM. workspaces are here, around 8200.

c000-ffff Guess: RAM or memory mapped ports.

At reset , c000 is  checked for a magic word before jumping into an initialization routine.  Three cases branch out:

>dead zeroes a cru bit, then does init

>babe skips part of the initialization 

otherwise, init: zero some other bit and initialize stuff. 

 

Speculate that c000 is not RAM, perhaps it's a latch, or the 9650 dual port chips. 
 

I also see a 74ALS870 near the 34010. This is a dual port register file, 16x4 bits. Interesting. 
 


 

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On 3/5/2024 at 12:51 PM, Gary from OPA said:

looking forward to the photos and what you find out.

 

What are you going to use this wonderful piece of development history for?

 I'm not speaking for @FarmerPotato, but one possibility that can imagined is developing a  TIGA board for the Pbox. A DSP  board could also be done with one of the TMS320 series. I will post some pics of the 320C25 emulator board shortly.

 

A modern project might go with one of the later descendants like the MVP, OMAP, Sitara, etc. but the 34010 would be easier to interface and would be close enough to period correct to have been an actual Pbox card if the Home Computer line had continued. 

 

The 34010 was actually considered as the host CPU for the Geneve, according to PC, who also lobbied for using, or allowing the use, of the NMI  (on the 9995, or...) to enable preemptive multi-tasking, if I'm recalling a Delphi TI Forum discussion correctly.

 

These days the community has pretty much standardized on the F18A, but these are some interesting concepts in my view.

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On 3/7/2024 at 2:04 AM, FarmerPotato said:

EPROMs dumped. Disassembly begins. 
 

There are four 32K banks in there. The first bank has some blank space at the end.  The second bank starts with 1K of zeroes. Lots  of string data in this bank. The string's full address (like ef7a) is given to XOP 1. I'm calling that PRINT. 
 

The string prompts indicate a full featured loader, debugger , and an assembler for 34010 code. 
 

 

I have the 320C25 emulator board out and will shoot for those EPROM images as well.

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1 hour ago, jbdigriz said:

Shaky cell cam pics of the 320C25 emu board, pod, connector, and daughterboard

I know, my first ones were like that.  I like that the scanner flatbed can be used on objects that aren't quite flat.

 

Thanks for showing these!   I see more similarity on the 9996 side, EPROM/SRAM, and the Cypress fast SRAM too.  But the 320C25 support is specific to that.

Yours has another board full of termination resistors, between the PCB and the probe pod.

 

 

I would love to compare the EPROMS.  See what is reused--probably the XOPs.  So far, I've disassembled & commented some XOPs.  Separate thread. 

 

 

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I've traced out most of the 9996 pin connections.  A hypothesis --the die is rotated vs the 9995-- helped guess and prove MEMEN.  I've used this to narrow down where to look for other pins, but several like RESET, NMI, HOLD, READY are probably all wired to VCC without even a resistor.   Where the 9995 has pins INT1, INT4, I find the full set of 9900 signals.  The code uses interrupt levels 1, 2, and 5.  7-15 immediately RTWP. The others go to RESET.

 

 

SE9996 CPU at U60

1    MEMEN*
2    NMI or RESET?
3    same
4    
5    ?VCC, or READY?
6    
7    A15 (MSB. TI A0)
8    A14
9    A13
10    A12
11    A11
12    A10
13    A9
14    A8
15    A7
16    A6
17    A5
18    A4
19    GND
20    A3
21    A2
22    A1 (LSB. TI A14)
23    CRUOUT (maybe A15 if used)
24    XTAL
25    XTAL
26    unknown. CLKOUT?
27    
28    D0 (LSB. TI D15)
29    D1
30    D2
31    D3
32    D4
--
33    D5
34    D6
35    D7
36    D8
37    D9
38    D10
39    D11
40    D12
41    D13
42    D14
43    D15 (MSB. TI D0)
44    GND or ?
45    GND or ?
46    IC3 (from 9901)
47    IC2
48    IC1
49    IC0
50    INTREQ* (from 9901)
51    
52    
53    CRUCLK
54    
55    
56    to PAL
57    
58    to PAL
59    VCC or ?
60    
61    
62    RD*
63    VCC or guess HOLD
64    WE*

 

The PAL at U71 has:

 

1     ?
2     ?
3     MEMEN*
4     RD*
5    CPU 56
6    CPU 58
7    CRUCLK
8    CRUOUT/A0
9    CPU A15
10    GND
--
11    CPU A14
12    Enable U62,63
13    
14    EPROM A13    
15    
16    Enable RAM U69
17    Enable RAM U65
18    
19    
20    VCC

 

The story here is that the PAL is able to translate the top 2 address bits from the CPU.  It also produces two signals to enable the RAM upper/lower bits. 

 

There are two 27C512 EPROMs for total 128K ROM.  The lower 13 address bits A12:0 are driven by CPU A13:1, so the page size is 8Kx16. (4 pages fill a 64Kx8 address space.) The next EPROM bit A13 is driven by PAL U71-14. The A14 bit goes to a jumper.   There's A15 yet to be traced. The jumper goes between either VCC or something else (not GND.) So the EPROM may hold two jumper-selected variations of the software. 

 

There are two 6264 RAM making 8Kx16. The RAM have separate enable signals out of the PAL. I speculate that CPU 56 and 58 may indicate upper or lower byte access.

 

I know from disassembly:

 

0000-3FFE resident ROM
4000-7FFE mostly data
8000-     ? probably memory-mapped devices like the two TMS9650s (256x16 memory)
C000-Exxx must be RAM. 

There are several tables of address pointers that support this. 

 

I traced out two '138s decoding CRU access using A11:6.

 

A15-13 (MSB) are 000 for CRU, else the external instruction code 
A12 - have not traced
A11:6 are decoded in the 138s along with MEMEN
A5:1 go to CRU devices such as 9901
A0 - not part of CRU address, it's CRUOUT data.

I have not figured out CRUIN - doesn't seem to go directly from 9901 to the CPU.

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On 3/8/2024 at 9:31 AM, jbdigriz said:

 I'm not speaking for @FarmerPotato, but one possibility that can imagined is developing a  TIGA board for the Pbox. A DSP  board could also be done with one of the TMS320 series. I will post some pics of the 320C25 emulator board shortly.

 

A modern project might go with one of the later descendants like the MVP, OMAP, Sitara, etc. but the 34010 would be easier to interface and would be close enough to period correct to have been an actual Pbox card if the Home Computer line had continued. 

 

The 34010 was actually considered as the host CPU for the Geneve, according to PC, who also lobbied for using, or allowing the use, of the NMI  (on the 9995, or...) to enable preemptive multi-tasking, if I'm recalling a Delphi TI Forum discussion correctly.

 

These days the community has pretty much standardized on the F18A, but these are some interesting concepts in my view.

It's just too many ideas.  

 

I've been interested in the 340 since I came across its Font Library booklet.   Maybe by 2030 I could add it to Geneve 2020...

 

Incidentally, I was looking at the MVP a week ago. Pretty sure it is the upcoming chip Karl Guttag described in the 1992 Delphi transcript.  I read the Hot Chips presentation.  It is way, way overkill for retro.

https://old.hotchips.org/wp-content/uploads/hc_archives/hc05/3_Tue/HC05.S5/HC05.5.2-Guttag-TI-MVP.pdf

 

 

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Always with the negative waves, Moriarty 🙂 But it is true the pbox is perhaps not the best platform for the relabeled TMS320C80, or the 'C40, which some of the Transputer software,  including Helios, was ported to.

 

Thanks for the link!

Edited by jbdigriz
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2 hours ago, jbdigriz said:

Always with the negative waves, Moriarty 🙂 But it is true the pbox is perhaps not the best platform for the relabeled TMS320C80, or the 'C40, which some of the Transputer software,  including Helios, was ported to.

 

Thanks for the link!

Wait, what? The MVP is 320C80? Or the other way round? 
 

Another is the TVP4010 and up. These were in late 90s gaming 3D accelerator graphics cards. GLint accelerator. Seems Texas Instruments did make inroads in mainstream graphics cards. 

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Posted (edited)

Question about TM990/307 IO ports:

 

Since XDS/22 once had a 307, I want to know the 307's port addresses. 

(my XDS  in 1989 hasnt got a real 307, maybe a hybrid derivative).  


My guess is:

CRU

0000 port 1 9902 9903

0040 port 2 9902

0080 port 3 9903 9902

 

I had looked at the 990/5 machine but that had a different order. 
 

XDS labeled port #3 is the only one  fitted in mine.  So, it's the  user terminal, the host.  Host may be CRU 0000 port #1 internally but labeled port #3 externally. 

 

The disassembled PRTCHR XOP branches depending on port.     Some SBO/SBZ are definitely not for 9902. Guess 9903.

 

It seems to honor outgoing XON/XOFF only on one port. If sending a Ctrl-S (XOFF) it truly zeroes RTSON. Transmitter off. Maybe this is for huge file upload from host. Maybe printing...

 

Edited by FarmerPotato
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8 hours ago, FarmerPotato said:

Wait, what? The MVP is 320C80? Or the other way round? 
 

Another is the TVP4010 and up. These were in late 90s gaming 3D accelerator graphics cards. GLint accelerator. Seems Texas Instruments did make inroads in mainstream graphics cards. 

Yes, some of the documentation still on the TI website references both designations, eg. https://www.ti.com/lit/ug/spru109a/spru109a.pdf. I think "MVP" is a more marketing derived label.

 

Right on the TVP4010 aka Permedia, iirc. Not of as much interest to me, though.

Edited by jbdigriz
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On 3/5/2024 at 12:41 PM, FarmerPotato said:

New TMS7000 additions to bitsavers today, including the generic http://bitsavers.org/components/ti/TMS7000/xds22/SPDU017_XDS_22_Installation_And_Operation_Guide_198310.pdf, which tells us that slot 3 is for "emulator board #2". Not sure if that is for a 2-board set, multiples of a target, or for two different targets. Wonder if it was ever used? Also specifically lists slots 5-7 as TM990.

 

Also, http://bitsavers.org/components/ti/TMS7000/xds22/SPDU019_XDS_Breakpoint_Trace_Installation_And_Operation_Guide_198310.pdf,

http://bitsavers.org/components/ti/TMS7000/xds22/SPDU020_XDS_TMS7000_Emulator_Hardware_198403.pdf,

board photos, rom images, and schematics  for the TMS7000 EVM, and a number of TMS7000 series datasheets and manuals, in http://bitsavers.org/components/ti/TMS7000 directory and the evm subdirectory there.

 

Looks to be  the material Fred J Kraan mentioned archiving, over on the vcfed forums. You can also find it on his site at https://electrickery.nl/comp/tms7k/doc/. Thanks, Fred! Thanks also, Jaak Bartok, the generous lender of the materials (see https://hackaday.io/project/19276-multi-t for a project they were used for.)  And thanks once again, bitsavers!

Edited by jbdigriz
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Accoding to this brochure in the tranche of documents above, http://bitsavers.org/components/ti/TMS7000/brochure/MPL_54_TMS7K_Brochure_1983.pdf, p. 14, the XDS/44 is/would be a "Standalone emulator. All features of XDS-33 plus bulk memory storage capability with additional board (to be announced)." TM990/303, maybe? Bubble memory? Not sure if this XDS was ever in production, but should be possible to replicate the hardware at least. 

 

Edited by jbdigriz
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By the time the TMS7000 evolved into or was replaced by the TMS370 series the standalone XDS was still in use, but it appears to me that TI  decided to host the debugger on a PC, or other computer, rather than onboard the XDS. So there may not have been a production XDS/44, nor possibly even an XDS/33, or if there were, it was only briefly. Just guessing, though.

 

Like to know for sure, but seems possible, if not likely. By that time the PC add-in emulators and SDKs were available, so most of the software tools as well as the debugger could be hosted on a PC.

 

Reference: https://www.ti.com/lit/ug/spnu127a/spnu127a.pdf, Section 17.

Edited by jbdigriz
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Posted (edited)
On 3/24/2024 at 5:14 PM, jbdigriz said:

TI  decided to host the debugger on a PC,

 My XDS/22 (1988) supports TMS34010 emulator.

 

 

I heard back from the engineer, Douglas Deao, (patents link) that the 34020 was supported in one new system,  XDS500, an ISA card with PC hosted software.   XDS500 drivers were unique in supporting the 34020 chip's MTAP boundary scan protocol.*   The next tool, XDS510, was produced by Spectrum Digital for Texas Instruments. It has drivers for  TMS320C2x and C3x DSPs, but not the TMS34020 graphics processor.  It's too bad, because the MTAP protocol is used in both 34020 and 320C25 which likely share the same 14-pin header.  And the XDS510s are abundant (if not cheap when complete.) 

 

Texas Instruments still uses the "XDS" trademark for debuggers/emulators. 
 

* MTAP links to follow

 

 

Edited by FarmerPotato
Rewrote
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  • 3 weeks later...

I've not really been part of the TI community since 1998 when I left TI. 
When TI left Bedford in 1995, although I was working on teletext design, I was also supporting the TMS9900 series of CPUs and associated equipment (such as TM990 cards and the old TM990/4 mini-computer).  When I asked what I was to do with the equipment and devices I was told "you can either scrap them or buy them". I bought them (apart from the 990/4).  

So now 30 years later I have a lot of stuff that was old 30 years ago and have decided that it needs to go. I looked around the web for someone who might be interested and found Stuart.
Stuart has agreed to take the 990 stuff and I have agreed to let him deal with it as he feels fit. He has already posted a list of most of what I have and I will do what I can to put this on a web page, so if you want any of it, please negotiate with Stuart (Stuart@blunham.com)
In addition to that list I have a TMS9995 XDS for sale (see Stuart). 
I also have quite a lot of TMS9995-4 at £10 a pair if anyone is interested -for contact see the bottom of my Texas page:
https://blunham.com/Misc/Texas

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