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When walls come tumbling down


Thomas Jentzsch

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Ok, it was "only" a big rack.

 

Yesterday morning, just a few minutes before I had to get up, I woke up by a loud crack noise followed by a big rumble right beside me.

 

When I switched on the light, I saw this. Sometimes collecting computer magazines can be dangerous... icon_ponder.gif

 

EDIT: New picture I made when I cleaned the room. Lock at the crack of the desk standing right besides my head! icon_surprised.gif

Shelf1a.jpg

Crack.JPG

Shelf2.jpg

SD531849a.jpg

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Oh, die Scheissdinger sind bei uns in der alten Wohnung auch aus der Wand gebrochen, auf der doppelten Breite allerdings, sah auch aus als hätte man eine Granate in den Raum geworfen :ponder:

 

Am besten auf richtige Regale umsteigen, die sind bei Ikea & co. im Endeffrekt nicht mal teurer :)

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Rawl bolts are your friend!

Oh, there where 2x4 big, original Fischer (the guy who invented this stuff, you know)-bolts used. And I tested the fixtures with my own weight on both sides.

 

But that was six years ago. I suppose the old, pre-war wall is still moving somehow and combined with the weight of 6 years of c't magazine, it was just too much.

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Oh, die Scheissdinger sind bei uns in der alten Wohnung auch aus der Wand gebrochen, auf der doppelten Breite allerdings, sah auch aus als hätte man eine Granate in den Raum geworfen :ponder:

Ich bin nur froh das ich nix abbekommen habe. Kaputt ist anscheinen auch kaum was.

 

Am besten auf richtige Regale umsteigen, die sind bei Ikea & co. im Endeffrekt nicht mal teurer :)

Dieses Regal habe ich seit Studentenzeiten gehabt. Ist seitdem 2x klaglos umgezogen.

 

Aber nächste Woche kommt Billy zu mir. ;)

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Ich bin nur froh das ich nix abbekommen habe. Kaputt ist anscheinen auch kaum was.

 

Gott sei Dank, ja! Wenn ichs mir vorstelle, ich habe auch jahrelang direkt unter so einer Todesfalle geschlafen :ponder:

 

Aber nächste Woche kommt Billy zu mir. ;)

 

Sieht um einiges stabiler aus. Ist definitv besser, wenn man in so einer Nachkriegswohnung haust. Bei uns ist ausser dem Regal auch mal ein kompletter Küchenschrank von der Wand gefallen, soviel Porzellan wurde nichtmal an unserem Polterabend zerdeppert :)

 

Seitdem gibts bei uns fast nur noch selbststehende Regale ;)

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Ne, Erdbebensicher sind wir da noch nicht. Wenn es verdächtig aussieht mache ich höchstens kleine Keile unter die Vorder-Füsse, damit der Schwerpunkt vom Regal Richtung Wand "fällt" :ponder:

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Ne, Erdbebensicher sind wir da noch nicht. Wenn es verdächtig aussieht mache ich höchstens kleine Keile unter die Vorder-Füsse, damit der Schwerpunkt vom Regal Richtung Wand "fällt" :ponder:

Es geht ja dabei auch mehr um Kinder, die daran hochklettern wollen.

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Some friends have the Billy bookcases from Ikea, they really like them. I got one of Ikea's modular systems for my TV room

http://spiceware.org/gallery/Misc/P1000010

 

Ikea doesn't sell it anymore and I don't recall the name. Thankfully I did a matching short shelf unit for next to the TV when I got it, it holds the AV equipment

http://spiceware.org/gallery/Misc/P1010083

Yes, I remember that system from the catalog. It sucks, when they stop selling just after you decided to buy it. I would be nice if they would produce a bit extra, so that you get a chance to buy them, after they got out of production.

 

I am going to buy some Billy shelfs. They are pretty cheap and its only for the sleeping room anyway.

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But that was six years ago. I suppose the old, pre-war wall is still moving somehow and combined with the weight of 6 years of c't magazine, it was just too much.

At least here, walls of that era are usually lath and plaster, and standard fasteners for drywall just don't work.

 

The only fasteners I've found that are reliable are toggle bolts:

toggle_bolt.jpg

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I used to actually have bookshelves directly over my bed when I was a kid. Not very bright in retrospect. Fortunately all I had on them were either plastic model kits or Atari 2600 games, which didn't weigh very much. :ponder: Since the Northridge earthquake though, I've been rather fanatical about over-attaching things to walls.

 

Now I always put the screws straight into the studs, even if I can't put the shelves exactly where I want them. If I have to, I'll use toggles like in batari's post, and a lot of them. But I always try to at least get some screws into the wall's structure.

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I happened upon the instructions for my Ikea shelving unit, it's the Journalist. Googling Ikea Journalist turns up people looking for parts.

 

Must be time for falling shelves - while not as dramatic as yours, it did startle me when it happened as I was putting a letter on the shelf.

P1010090.sized.jpg

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I used to actually have bookshelves directly over my bed when I was a kid. Not very bright in retrospect. Fortunately all I had on them were either plastic model kits or Atari 2600 games, which didn't weigh very much. :ponder: Since the Northridge earthquake though, I've been rather fanatical about over-attaching things to walls.

 

Now I always put the screws straight into the studs, even if I can't put the shelves exactly where I want them. If I have to, I'll use toggles like in batari's post, and a lot of them. But I always try to at least get some screws into the wall's structure.

The problem with studs in old houses is that stud finders don't work on lath and plaster. Also, with modern houses, you can often rely on studs to be spaced at 16" on center, but older houses usually aren't built like that, so finding one stud by accident doesn't help you.
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The problem with studs in old houses is that stud finders don't work on lath and plaster. Also, with modern houses, you can often rely on studs to be spaced at 16" on center, but older houses usually aren't built like that, so finding one stud by accident doesn't help you.

That's the advantage here. Our houses are build complete with concrete and massive stones, no fragile wooden walls.

 

Though, even that doesn't always help... :ponder:

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The problem with studs in old houses is that stud finders don't work on lath and plaster. Also, with modern houses, you can often rely on studs to be spaced at 16" on center, but older houses usually aren't built like that, so finding one stud by accident doesn't help you.

That's the advantage here. Our houses are build complete with concrete and massive stones, no fragile wooden walls.

 

Though, even that doesn't always help... :ponder:

At least on the west coast of the USA, the flexibility of wooden structures is actually an advantage as it leads to better earthquake resistance than stone, brick and (unreinforced) concrete.

 

As for attaching stuff to concrete/stone walls, I'd imagine your best options are drilling with a masonry bit, and attaching fasteners in epoxy?

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As for attaching stuff to concrete/stone walls, I'd imagine your best options are drilling with a masonry bit, and attaching fasteners in epoxy?

Masonry bits, yes. But epoxy, no.

 

We use Fischer Wall Plugs. pl1260ny.jpg

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As for attaching stuff to concrete/stone walls, I'd imagine your best options are drilling with a masonry bit, and attaching fasteners in epoxy?

Masonry bits, yes. But epoxy, no.

 

We use Fischer Wall Plugs. pl1260ny.jpg

I'd use Tapcon anchors or similar if you can find them. We use these all the time at work for tying into cinderblock and concrete. I've never had one fail yet.

sideview-screw.jpg

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