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A guy on Reddit posted them a few years ago, then reposted recently. The pics are in his Imgur album. Here's his original comment:

 

"Long story short my step dads father worked as a developer at Milton Bradley and moved to Mattel shortly after. While digging through some of his stuff a couple years ago I found these development/prototype cartridges. I didn't give them much thought until recently and am now trying to seek some answers. I do not have the carts in hand as they are at my dads house. I asked him to take a couple pictures this morning and send them to me. I can always ask for more or more detailed images if need be."

Edited by JasonlikesINTV
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From Keith Robinson:

 

These appear to simply be early hand-wired prototypes of T-cards. Early 8K T-cards held four 8-bit EPROMS holding the LSB (2 least significant bits) and MSB (8 most significant bits) of the 10-bit ROM code. There additionally were extra chips for latching and addressing. The chips seen here correspond to the same chips on a T-card. I’ll show it to a couple of people who worked in the hardware (Design & Development) department for their take, but I’m going to say they are early handmade T-cards.

Keith
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From Keith Robinson:

 

These appear to simply be early hand-wired prototypes of T-cards. Early 8K T-cards held four 8-bit EPROMS holding the LSB (2 least significant bits) and MSB (8 most significant bits) of the 10-bit ROM code. There additionally were extra chips for latching and addressing. The chips seen here correspond to the same chips on a T-card. I’ll show it to a couple of people who worked in the hardware (Design & Development) department for their take, but I’m going to say they are early handmade T-cards.

Keith

 

 

Wow -- a prototype of the prototype!

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The man who had these cards did a game for the TI-99-4a called Zero Zap while with Milton Bradley. Looks a little like BLIX. I've sent the info that I have to Keith as well. I have a copy of the full definition photos and I forwarded them to Keith as well.

 

While at Milton Bradley he worked on the Microvision Handheld as well and was working on Football for it when he left.

 

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The man who had these cards did a game for the TI-99-4a called Zero Zap while with Milton Bradley. Looks a little like BLIX. I've sent the info that I have to Keith as well. I have a copy of the full definition photos and I forwarded them to Keith as well.

 

While at Milton Bradley he worked on the Microvision Handheld as well and was working on Football for it when he left.

 

 

According to this web site ( http://www.videogamehouse.net/zerozapgv.html), Zero Zap was programmed by Herb Schmitz and released 3Q/1979. MicroVision games were released from 1979 to 1982. Couldn't find any other programming credits for this programmer.

 

The other interesting I found out at that site was that Milton Bradley was developing a game system based on a TI 16-bit processor. Milton Bradley lost the rights to the system to Texas Instruments who released the MB system as the TI-99/4.

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The other interesting I found out at that site was that Milton Bradley was developing a game system based on a TI 16-bit processor. Milton Bradley lost the rights to the system to Texas Instruments who released the MB system as the TI-99/4.

Wow, I'd never heard that! Very interesting.

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I could find no other credits for Herbert (Herb) Schmitz either. I did forward that name to Keith to see if any more light can be put on these objects. Andrew, who's grandfather was Herb will try to get them on his next visit.

 

I do find the "Feet" to be long. I only have an Intellivision II out right now and those are about 1/2 inch off the table to the cart slot. These legs look taller than that. I'll have to measure the height of the Intellivision slot.

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It would be great to get a hardware guy to accept and interview on the Intellivisionaries Podcast, get their understanding about why certain things were done, maybe even how.

 

 

 

From Keith Robinson:

 

These appear to simply be early hand-wired prototypes of T-cards. Early 8K T-cards held four 8-bit EPROMS holding the LSB (2 least significant bits) and MSB (8 most significant bits) of the 10-bit ROM code. There additionally were extra chips for latching and addressing. The chips seen here correspond to the same chips on a T-card. I’ll show it to a couple of people who worked in the hardware (Design & Development) department for their take, but I’m going to say they are early handmade T-cards.

Keith

 

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