Jump to content
IGNORED

laserdisk for computers?


Recommended Posts

There were interfaces, but the only dedicated computer-specific laserdisc-based system (complete with actual laserdisc player) I can think of is the Palcom MSX Laserdisc series. I've toyed with adding one to my collection over the years, but they're understandably expensive.

 

I do have a LaserActive, but obviously that's a modular console system, not a computer system.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There were all kinds of magneto-optical drives for mass storage before CDs and DVDs took over as standard, but they were expensive and not really for consumers.

 

I wouldn't have wanted to bother with the early days of laserdisc, personally. Not enough software for it. I'm a game-playing ape!

 

http://www.computerhistory.org/timeline/memory-storage/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since many laserdisc players had RS-232 interfaces built in, there was no need to make models specifically for computers.

We had such a beast hooked up to an Amiga at the store I worked at.

It used a genlock to combine the computer and laser disk output.

We were running an actual Commodore demo on the system and it was really impressive.

But any system with an RS-232 port could control the laserdisk.

The TI 9918 VDP has some sort of support for video overlay, so machines based on that could do the same thing if they supported the feature.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The TI 9918 VDP has some sort of support for video overlay, so machines based on that could do the same thing if they supported the feature.

 

Yeah, that was really the whole impetus behind Coleco planning something similar for the ColecoVision. I saved a whole $80 as a kid towards Coleco's planned solution, which, of course, never materialized.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did any companies ever make laserdisk drives for computers ?

 

Maybe this info would be useful for you: http://www.msxcomputermagazine.nl/mccw/93/msxlaserdisc/en.html

 

I actually played Badlands in the eighties, here is the laserdisc in full:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NXy0UJMI9i0

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Besides the msx were there laserdisc games avaliable for other computers ?

There were VHD games that were on discs that were similar to RCA CED discs. JVC made a series of computers that were MSX based that could play these games including things like Cobra Command. There were also a series of PAL laserdisc games for the Amiga by a company called Software Corner. They released Dragon's Lair, Space Ace and Thayer's Quest and you just needed a connection cable from the Amiga to the laserdisc player and a boot disc that ran off the floppy drive.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Were these the full (i.e. arcade) versions of the game?

Yes. The licensing is a little murky. I've seen posts by one of the guys that did the coding claiming that they were fully licensed, but I'm a little skeptical. I have two of the three discs and they pop up occasionally on Ebay.UK and Ebay.DE.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

There were Laserdisc drives especially for computer systems.

Very robust and in grey color.

The company were I work used them on computer systems for training purposes back in the 90s.

 

The Ebay link doesn't work from the US. You must go directly to Ebay Germany:

 

http://www.ebay.de/itm/Pioneer-CLD-V2300D-Laserdiscplayer-neu-/391791198102?hash=item5b38933f96:g:ICgAAOSwONBZBaFI

post-30718-0-67570500-1495438314_thumb.jpg

Edited by Intymike
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

There were Laserdisc drives especially for computer systems.

Very robust and in grey color.

The company were I work used them on computer systems for training purposes back in the 90s.

 

The Ebay link doesn't work from the US. You must go directly to Ebay Germany:

...

That looks like the same model that was hooked to the Amiga except it was black.

 

*edit*

There are quite a few used Pioneer laser disks on ebay that have a serial port.

CLD-V2200, CLD-V2300, CLD-V2400, CLD-V2600, CLD-V2800, CLD-V5000, etc...

 

The CLD models seem to be for industrial or classroom use.

Many lack things like S-Video or digital audio out that you might find in home units. They might even be single sided, requiring you to flip the disk if you are watching a movie.

 

This looks like a good resource:

http://www.dragons-lair-project.com/tech/ldguide/pioneer.asp

Edited by JamesD
Link to comment
Share on other sites

THe professionnal models are sturdy and made for professionnal, school and training uses yeah.

And Indeed, being designed to be robust, they doesn't come with fancy functions.

This very one (I have the same) come with PAL/NTSC compatibility, output PAL or NTSC (regardless of the disc you shove in (tho if I recall, NTSC discs will be output as PAL-60, not PAL 50htz - not sure about PAL discs in NTSC, I dunno why I would try that XD)) read analog audio, digital audio, have a connection for a barcode reader, computer, and an excellent composite video out.

Interestingly, it's compatible with a subtitle standard set for LD, but you need an external decoder to display them (I assume that it make the subtible decoder cheaper to have the process into the player rather than inside the box)

 

But indeed, no Dolby Stereo or double sided reading, tho, from what I know, dual-sided or rotating head readers (at least in Europe) were very rare and are usually (IMO) too expensive to justify the cost of one (I got that Pioneer CLD for 35E, any double sided player will cost between 250 and 300E!)

Edited by CatPix
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And as I seen in the photos of the back in the auction, no ports for the remote plugs.

But thats the way to use game laserdiscs like the Dragons Lair that I own.

A connection between the serial bus of the Computer (C64, Amiga) and the port of the remote on a standard LD player.

post-30718-0-13175400-1495470377_thumb.jpg

post-30718-0-71482600-1495470389.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And as I seen in the photos of the back in the auction, no ports for the remote plugs.

But thats the way to use game laserdiscs like the Dragons Lair that I own.

A connection between the serial bus of the Computer (C64, Amiga) and the port of the remote on a standard LD player.

On the machine in the auction, the connector isn't a standard RS-232, it has fewer pins.

It's along the top left of the machine next to the dip switches.

There also seems to be another connector below that.

Edited by JamesD
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And as I seen in the photos of the back in the auction, no ports for the remote plugs.

But thats the way to use game laserdiscs like the Dragons Lair that I own.

A connection between the serial bus of the Computer (C64, Amiga) and the port of the remote on a standard LD player.

 

are you using a laserdisc that is for the arcade ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

are you using a laserdisc that is for the arcade ?

 

There was in Germany a company that sold LDGs with home computer interfaces (Amiga, C64...). The Laserdiscs are specially produced but are based on the original arcade LDs.

They are single sided CAV discs, so you can head for every single frame on the disc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...