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Strips, Reference Cards, Manuals, Labels and more! (HQ)


Omega-TI

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1 minute ago, Atari2600PAL said:

It's the editor/assembler one a few posts up that I wanted to edit the text on

I just tried that template in The GIMP, and the text areas are not editable.  I could probably whip it into an editable file, if you need.

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1 minute ago, OLD CS1 said:

I just tried that template in The GIMP, and the text areas are not editable.  I could probably whip it into an editable file, if you need.

Oh, thanks for checking. I'll see what I can do creating one for myself in affinity

 

Many thanks for the offer though

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  • 1 month later...
12 minutes ago, Atari2600PAL said:

I don't have an original strip for my TI-writer but I do have a dozen or so blank strips

 

So could anyone recommend what sort of pen is best for writing on them, so they won't smudge, please?

 

Many thanks

One way to keep them from smudging would be to write the text carefully so as not to smudge while writing, and then cover the top of the strip with a piece of invisible tape, trimming the excess off with an Xacto knife. Then the ink will be shielded from contact and shouldn't smudge at all. Generally, I just made myself new strips with the templates I put up in this thread a few years ago. I use paper with the printed matter on it, rubberized glue, some thin cardboard (hanging file folders are great for this), and some tape to protect the top surface. They work pretty good that way. I also tried getting some printed on vinyl label material, but those came out a bit too bright somehow.

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17 minutes ago, Ksarul said:

One way to keep them from smudging would be to write the text carefully so as not to smudge while writing, and then cover the top of the strip with a piece of invisible tape, trimming the excess off with an Xacto knife. Then the ink will be shielded from contact and shouldn't smudge at all.

Thanks, that will protect the writing from smudging

 

I'm not sure what type of pen to use though. A biro won't write on it properly and the only other thing I have to hand is a sharpie but even though it says it's fine it's way too thick for writing on the strips

 

I guess I need to find something similar to a sharpie but much finer. Wish I still had my draughting pens but they went a long time ago.

 

Will have a search on amazon

 

Many thanks

 

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The ultra fine sharpie was fine enough (and smudge proof) but I decided I didn’t like my writing!

 

In the end I printed the strips I currently wanted, from this thread thanks, onto glossy sticker paper, cut them out with a knife and stuck them onto spare strips

 

They look good and feel strong

 

Many thanks

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7 hours ago, Atari2600PAL said:

The ultra fine sharpie was fine enough (and smudge proof) but I decided I didn’t like my writing!

 

In the end I printed the strips I currently wanted, from this thread thanks, onto glossy sticker paper, cut them out with a knife and stuck them onto spare strips

 

They look good and feel strong

 

Many thanks

I'm glad you liked them!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Sorry to be a pain, but does anyone have a scan of the UCSD p-system binder spine they are willing to share please?

 

(Have got a spare TI binder and am intending to print out all the manuals, as I doubt I'll be able to find an original set)

 

Many thanks

 

EDIT: Can't believe I missed the scan I wanted on the previous page in this thread, sorry

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On 8/26/2023 at 3:26 PM, Atari2600PAL said:

Sorry to be a pain, but does anyone have a scan of the UCSD p-system binder spine they are willing to share please?

 

(Have got a spare TI binder and am intending to print out all the manuals, as I doubt I'll be able to find an original set)

 

Many thanks

Just realised there are 3 separate binders, so a scan wouldn't work for all manuals in a single binder

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On 8/28/2023 at 1:46 PM, Atari2600PAL said:

Just realised there are 3 separate binders, so a scan wouldn't work for all manuals in a single binder

There is actually only one binder--it comes with the card. The other manuals came shrink-wrapped with the disks and you just added the manuals to the binder. BITD, they were actually harder to find than the card was--nobody had them in stock. I actually ended up buying mine from a TI store in downtown Riyadh from the guy who was the importer for Saudi Arabia. He had the three disk packages--but none of the cards, so his disk set was pretty useless to him there. I bought them, which saved him from a loss--and got me the disks I couldn't find anywhere else.

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3 hours ago, Ksarul said:

There is actually only one binder--it comes with the card. The other manuals came shrink-wrapped with the disks and you just added the manuals to the binder. BITD, they were actually harder to find than the card was--nobody had them in stock. I actually ended up buying mine from a TI store in downtown Riyadh from the guy who was the importer for Saudi Arabia. He had the three disk packages--but none of the cards, so his disk set was pretty useless to him there. I bought them, which saved him from a loss--and got me the disks I couldn't find anywhere else.

this matches my experience and binder

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Thanks @ti99iuc

 

I have a spare genuine TI binder (got it from @arcadeshopper with EA in it, but in the end didn't need it as I got a free sealed copy of EA - long story) so will use that for my self printed UCSD manuals (if I don't find an original). I have a 750 sheet ream of US Letter paper on its way which will hopefully be enough if I print both sides. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 8/30/2023 at 10:08 AM, Atari2600PAL said:

Thanks @ti99iuc

 

I have a spare genuine TI binder (got it from @arcadeshopper with EA in it, but in the end didn't need it as I got a free sealed copy of EA - long story) so will use that for my self printed UCSD manuals (if I don't find an original). I have a 750 sheet ream of US Letter paper on its way which will hopefully be enough if I print both sides. 

Finally finished printing out all the UCSD manuals on US Letter paper to fit an original TI binder

 

Had to settle for paper rather than card section covers

 

Didn't realise just how much ink I'd get thru, but I definitely ordered too much paper (forgot I was printing double sided!)

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  • 7 months later...

I found this curiosity, a 2-pager on 'TMS-9900 ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE WITH TI EXTENDED BASIC'.

 

Did it come with the Extended BASIC cartridge?  Or maybe the p-Code peripheral?  It might have been internal to Texas Instruments.  It says TI-99/4 not 4A.

 

Assembly Language With TI Extended BASIC.txtAssembly Language With TI Extended BASIC.pdf

 

 

        TMS-9900 ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE WITH TI EXTENDED BASIC

        TI Extended BASIC has the capability, when used with the Memory
        Expansion accessory, to load and execute TMS-9900 Assembly 
        Language subprograms.  Assembly Language routines may be entered 
        and assembled using the TI-99/4 UCSD PASCAL(tm) Development
        System.  This document provides an overview of the capabilities, 
        how they are accessed from TI Extended BASIC, and how assembly
        routines may be developed.

        Assembly Language routines called from Extended BASIC may be
        used to make algorithms execute more rapidly, or to provide 
        complex control of the video screen or the sound chip.  Assembly 
        routines are normally loaded in a relocatable form into a
        dedicated 8K byte block of the Memory Expansion.  Using 
        relocatable code allows routines to be written and used
        independently of the actual loaded address in memory.  Also, 
        combinations of several routines may be used from one BASIC 
        program without concern for the load address.  Assembly routines
        are called from the BASIC program by name.  The actual address of 
        the routine is resolved during execution.  One or more entry 
        names for a routine are defined when the routine is written.

        The 8K byte reserved block of the Memory Expansion may be used
        by Assembly Language.  In addition, a portion of the other 24K 
        bytes in the Memory Expansion is available depending on the size 
        of the BASIC program being run.  An assembly routine may or may 
        not return control to BASIC.  It may actually take control of 
        the TI-99/4 and act as an entire application.  In this instance, 
        the entire memory resources of the TI-99/4 are available for use
        by the assembly subprogram.

        A set of utility routines is provided for Assembly Language 
        subprograms to easily access unique hardware resources such as 
        the Video Display Processor, and to pick up the values of 
        arguments or return values to the BASIC program.  A set of 
        subroutines may be linked with an assembly routine to provide 
        access to peripherals.  With these routines, an assembly 
        subprogram may easily execute I/O to a diskette, RS-232 or other 
        peripheral.

        Three statements in the Extended BASIC language (CALL INIT, CALL 
        LOAD, and CALL LINK) are provided to support the Assembly
        Language capability.


        The BASIC subprogram CALL INIT is used to intitialize the RAM
        Expansion for assembly subprograms.  This subprogram ensures
        that the Memory Expansion has been attached.  It then loads a
        set of utilities from ROM memory in the Extended BASIC command


        TMS-9900 Assembly Language                               Page 2
         with TI Extended BASIC


        module.  into the Memory Expansion.  CALL INIT also causes any pre- 
        viously loaded assembly routines to be undefined.  Any
        subsequently loaded routines will remain defined until another 
        CALL INIT is executed or the Memory Expansion is turned off.

        The BASIC subprogram CALL LOAD is used to load an Assembly
        object file into the Memory Expansion.  Alternatively, 
        direct data may be specified in the form of addresses and data
        in the CALL LOAD statement.  An object file may contain 
        relocatable or absolute address code.  Direct data may only be
        absolute.  Because of the difficulty in defining the entry point
        name from direct data, it is not recommended for general use in
        an entire program.  However, if this is necessary, we 
        can provide technical assistance to help accomplish this. 
        Examples of CALL LOAD statements follow:

                1.  CALL LOAD("CS1")

                2.  CALL LOAD("DSK1.MYOBJECT", "DSK1.OBJECT2")

                3.  CALL LOAD(12000,04,01,02,0,255,255)

        The first two are examples of loading from a file while the
        third uses direct data.

        The BASIC subprogram CALL LINK is used to link to an Assembly
        Language subprogram.  This statement specifies the routine to be 
        called and any arguments to that routine.  For example

                CALL LINK("NSORT",A(,))

        could be written to sort array elements in row A(2,n) so that 
        elements in row A(1l,n) are in ascending order.  In this example, 
        NSORT is the name of the routine.  One argument is passed as two 
        dimensional array A.  Values in this array are changed and 
        returned to the BASIC program.

        Development of Assembly Language programs to run under Extended 
        BASIC may be done on the PASCAL Development System.  This system 
        includes a powerful text editor, macroassembler, and link
        editor.  A set of macros is provided during assembly to 
        facilitate accessing specific TI-99/4 hardware features such as
        the Video Display Processor, or the sound chip.  An I/0 utility 
        is available which may be linked with an assembly routine to
        provide access to peripherals such as disk drive, RS-232, etc. 
        Although the disk format of the PASCAL system is different from
        that used by Extended BASIC, a utility is provided to convert a 
        PASCAL object file to the format required by Extended BASIC.

        **UCSD PASCAL is a trademark of the Regents of the University of 
          California.

 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Looking for unreleased game carts for tigervision's "Changes" and "Matterhorn". Anyone out there have working rom files? I know they were unreleased but so were some of the funware carts and they ended up on the internet regardless.

I also have some custom made art for them being that they were not released.

TigerVision_Changes.png

TigerVision_Matterhorn.png

TigerVision_Springer.png

Edited by kat71753
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