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Would you back a second RVGS crowdfunding campaign?


Amstari
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Would you back a second RVGS crowdfunding campaign?  

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  1. 1. Would you back a second RVGS crowdfunding campaign?



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I chose "Waiting for more details", as I won't buy anything Mike is in charge of. If they bring in someone else to run the business and they have a decent product, I don't have an issue giving them my money.

 

Regardless, they still won't be successful with a new campaign if they continue to expect $2M+ in sales..

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If they bring in someone else to run the business and they have a decent product, I don't have an issue giving them my money.

 

Mike = RVGS

RVGS = Mike

 

It was his gig from the get-go. If he isn't running the campaign, who else would?

And by the time a real RVGS is ready to ship at the post office I'm likely to have found other interests.

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I would consider the console in some form once it is complete, funded, in some peoples hands for review and I find it suits me. Possibly this would bar any chance of me getting one but I just would be to nervous backing anything developed by MIKE and his "team". I hope they do release something someday and all the best of luck but after the last train wreck I need to be sure before buying into it.

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wtf another thread about this thing....

 

With all due respect to him I simply won't support anything until after it's funded and released. After the somewhat botched magazine (IMO) and the console I can't trust him to deliver something I would want. He tries to deliver stuff that everyone wants (I know most of us do) but they fall short of expectations. If he would be more frank like Kevtris and drop the salesman\marketing antics I would be more willing to lend my support ($$$).

 

So be up front with me and honest otherwise I can't do it buddy sorry.

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I think I'm happy leaving the past in the past. There are other, more creative ways to achieve the goal of "retro style" gameplay that don't require the inherent limitations of expensive rom cartridges and exclusive, locked-out platforms.

 

I was fascinated to see the hamfisted attempts at PR damage control in the first RVGS campaign, and I suspect we haven't seen the last of that. I will continue to watch this with detached interst, but RVGS will likely see the same amount of my money as they ever did (none).

 

In the meantime, I was reminded how good things are in the present day. Just today I found a pleasant little pixelated shootemup called Starseed that plays like a combination of Galaga, Sinistar, and The Dreadnaught Factor. Two dollars. And Steve Jackson's Sorcery 3, a fun "game book" style dice and text adventure game. One dollar. Both on my iPhone which is always in my pocket.

 

Anyone who tells you games were better in the 1980s is selling something, and that something is likely to not be a very good deal for you.

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For me, no. The way they treated the community was simply reprehensible and I won't be willing to give them a second chance. The original idea had my interest barely piqued as it was, and I still feel the same way about playing games I can mostly already get elsewhere at a lesser cost.

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After the clusterf*ck that was the RVGS, I don't think I can ever support him with anything again... :roll:

 

Don't get me wrong, I love the concept of a new physical games system, and believe that carts may someday make a comeback much like vinyl records have. However, Mike is NOT the guy who will do it.

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Comparing the vinyl comeback to carts is just ridiculous. High res downloads don't provide anything more than vinyl does; in fact you get less. Whereas with modern games you get updates, DLC, online play, leaderboards, etc. And this doesn't even take into account paying $50 for a cart version of a title with less features than a $10 download.

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I think I'm happy leaving the past in the past. There are other, more creative ways to achieve the goal of "retro style" gameplay that don't require the inherent limitations of expensive rom cartridges and exclusive, locked-out platforms.

 

[..]

 

In the meantime, I was reminded how good things are in the present day. Just today I found a pleasant little pixelated shootemup called Starseed that plays like a combination of Galaga, Sinistar, and The Dreadnaught Factor. Two dollars. And Steve Jackson's Sorcery 3, a fun "game book" style dice and text adventure game. One dollar. Both on my iPhone which is always in my pocket.

 

Creative and versatile and better ways indeed. There has to be at least 10 ways of doing the original classics through emulation, original hardware, and ports.. All the way to restyled remakes on present day platforms, both of hobbyist origin and professional/commercial efforts from the big boys. Do we need yet another platform?

 

 

Anyone who tells you games were better in the 1980s is selling something, and that something is likely to not be a very good deal for you.

 

Are you speaking of the the actual game content or the delivery and presentation method? Because I personally find many of today's games to be too skinner box like. Too much churn and repetition.

 

 

Don't get me wrong, I love the concept of a new physical games system, and believe that carts may someday make a comeback much like vinyl records have. However, Mike is NOT the guy who will do it.

 

I don't believe that there will be a significant cartridge comeback. Maybe among collectors and hoarders, sure. But that's a limited niche within a niche scenario.

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If they (whoever they is) form a new team they need to keep their salespeople away from any engineering work. In my own projects (not videogame related at all) I do this and it works it real nice. I have an intermediary buffer between the two departments. There's just too much ridiculous antics and noise generated by marketing. None of it is conducive to clear-headed engineering.

 

And if they do start up again. They better not be asking for us to fund their company. That alone is enough to turn me away. Kickstarter wasn't meant for that now was it?

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The real poll question should be: Do you think the Retro VGS will be back? 1) Maybe. 2) No. 3) Hell no.

 

Alternatively: What will happen to the Atari Jaguar tooling? 1) Reused as a new console 2) Used to make new custom Jaguar shells 3) Sold to a another party 4) Melted to make Valyrian steel swords for his heirs.

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After looking around the web, it seems to be that overall people don't want cartridges. If it's indie they want Android or PC. Most cited reasons why - no physical hassle and you get updates.

And your device/game is bricked/lost when the cloud server goes offline. Vinyl records account for like 16% of music sales and is growing. Not saying it will overtake CD's but there is a current backlash against shitty mp3s and digital downloads.

 

With gaming, you have carts, discs, and the digital download. Nintendo NX will not have a CD drive, and Sony/MS will likely enforce download only. Hell they already have mandatory installs, day one updates, and only use the disc to verify ownership.

 

Carts are the gaming analog to vinyl, and maybe floppy disk to the cassette. Whatever. There will be backlash during the ninth generation when the big three gaming companies finally eliminate the disc drive. Gamestop will go bankrupt or at least undergo a massive downsize and probably evolve to cater to the collectible market rather than gamers. Hipsters are already going crazy over retro games, and indies are capitalizing on that nostalgia, creating games inspired by pixel art.

 

Someone is going to fill the void with a cartridge based system that plays new games, but it ain't gonna be the RetroVGS. It will be small, kind of underground much like vinyl is now, but sustainable. The fundamental difference between the music analogue to games is propriety. Games are proprietary to a specific system, whereas music/video can easily be converted to new mediums. So you can take a Lady Gaga or Katy Perry album and put it on vinyl, but you can't simply port a modern franchise like Halo over to 2600.

 

Oh wait, yes you can! :grin:

large_998_2600_Halo_2.jpg

Edited by stardust4ever
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